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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 38

post #556 of 6077
I get stopped by cops maybe twice a week. I don't really care anymore. Glad I am young and appear dangerous.
post #557 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hombre Secreto View Post

I get stopped by cops maybe twice a week. I don't really care anymore. Glad I am young and appear dangerous.

Seriously you get stopped twice a week? What is the bullshit excuse why?
post #558 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hombre Secreto View Post

I get stopped by cops maybe twice a week. I don't really care anymore. Glad I am young and appear dangerous.

Why? Driving While Black?
post #559 of 6077
Criminal Justice Related...

Lawyer says client took cyanide pill in court to commit suicide after guilty verdict
Quote:
Convicted of four felony counts concerning the sexual abuse of a 12-year-old girl, a 52-year-old man took a pill as the jury was being polled and collapsed within half an hour, his lawyer says.

Attorney Salvatore Piemonte said his client, Jon K. Massey, collapsed as he was being led out of the Watertown courtroom approximately half an hour after the Feb. 28 verdict. Massey told deputies he had taken a cyanide pill, reports the Post-Standard. He died two days later at a local hospital.

In a press release provided to the Watertown Daily Times, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department confirmed the comment but did not identify the substance Massey said he had taken:

“While a deputy and a New York state court officer escorted Massey from the court complex, he began to show signs of sickness and anxiety. Massey stated he had taken an undetermined substance directly after the verdict,” the release states.

A subsequent Watertown Daily Times story says unidentified sources confirmed Massey's cyanide comment, although the official cause of death isn't yet known. It also says courtroom security video appears to show him taking the pill.

"There were serious concerns that this situation could occur, but I had addressed them as best as I thought I could,” Piemonte told the Times, explaining that he had tried to take reasonable measures to prevent a possible suicide.

He also said he had not personally seen Massey take the pill and was unaware of any problem until he was called by a news reporter after his client's collapse.

Although cyanide can kill almost instantaneously if it is inhaled, ingesting it in tablet form slows the process of death and makes treatment possible.

Massey was expected to get prison time, although he had not yet been sentenced in the Watertown case.
post #560 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hombre Secreto View Post

I get stopped by cops maybe twice a week. I don't really care anymore. Glad I am young and appear dangerous.

Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Seriously you get stopped twice a week? What is the bullshit excuse why?

Quote:
Originally Posted by taxgenius View Post

Why? Driving While Black?

After the first few times, it becomes a game. Back in the day when I was a teenager... ordered out of the car at gun point multiple times. You keep it clean in the car and get dirty dirty elsewhere so that when they searchin the car and don't find anything, they have to let you walk. Nothing burns like not making the pinch and letting someone walk.
post #561 of 6077

This whole thread is very depressing, I once wanted to be a policeman mostly to help people.

Most of the cops here are cowards and sadists.

post #562 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by wojt View Post

This whole thread is very depressing, I once wanted to be a policeman mostly to help people.
Most of the cops here are cowards and sadists.

Went through the academy, went and got me a fancy cop degree, had interviews.... and walked away from it. One of the smarter things I did in my life.


post #563 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by zarathustra View Post



After the first few times, it becomes a game. Back in the day when I was a teenager... ordered out of the car at gun point multiple times. You keep it clean in the car and get dirty dirty elsewhere so that when they searchin the car and don't find anything, they have to let you walk. Nothing burns like not making the pinch and letting someone walk.

I've never understood potheads who drive around with their stuff in the car. Like, getting from point A to B and you get unlucky, ok, whatever, but some of these guys just store it there. Some of 'em even like smoking in the car. You're just asking for trouble.
post #564 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by zarathustra View Post


Went through the academy, went and got me a fancy cop degree, had interviews.... and walked away from it. One of the smarter things I did in my life.


 

nice bass in this song, wasn't expecting that!

 

why did you walk away?

post #565 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by wojt View Post

nice bass in this song, wasn't expecting that!

why did you walk away?

Every single cop I knew, met or instructed me was broken (and their families were as well) in some manner. When you deal with the shit of society (including other cops) every day you tend to become what you are around. How many times are you going to hold back when you walk in on a guy beating the shit out of his wife and kids? Or the guy who brutally raped and assaulted a young girl?

What used to be clearly delineated lines became blurry. What was wrong before could be justified.

Also, before there were any real studies into this stuff, it was clear that cops had higher instances of suicides, coronary issues, high blood pressure, substance abuse issues, spousal/partner abuse issues, and could not maintain sold personal relationships with anyone. Their badges are the only thing that saved a lot of them from jail time. At that point, I was young and naïve and thought that some of this was simply unique to being a cop. I did not want to turn into those men.... I thought I could be better than that.

As it turns out, being a small business owner has many of the same issues and no early retirement nor a fat pension. ffffuuuu.gif


Quote:
Policing is dangerous work, and the danger lurks not on the streets alone.

The pressures of law enforcement put officers at risk for high blood pressure, insomnia, increased levels of destructive stress hormones, heart problems, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and suicide, University at Buffalo researchers have found through a decade of studies of police officers.

UB researchers now are carrying out one of the first large-scale investigations on how the stress of police work affects an officer's physical and mental health, funded by a $1.75 million grant from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

The National Institute of Justice added $750,000 to the study to measure police officer fatigue and the impact of shift work on health and performance.

John M. Violanti, Ph.D., research associate professor in UB's Department of Social and Preventive Medicine in the School of Public Health and Health Professions, is principal researcher of the study, called the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Occupational Police Stress (BCOPS) study.

More than 400 police officers have participated in the study to date, with the researchers aiming for 500. The clinical examination involves questionnaires on lifestyle and psychological factors such as depression and PTSD, in addition to measures of bone density and body composition, ultrasounds of brachial and carotid arteries, salivary cortisol samples and blood samples. The officers also wear a small electronic device to measure the quantity and quality of sleep throughout a typical police shift cycle.

Results from Violanti's pilot studies have shown, among other findings, that officers over age 40 had a higher 10-year risk of a coronary event compared to average national standards; 72 percent of female officers and 43 percent of male officers, had higher-than-recommended cholesterol levels; and police officers as a group had higher-than-average pulse rates and diastolic blood pressure.

"Policing is a psychologically stressful work environment filled with danger, high demands, ambiguity in work encounters, human misery and exposure to death," said Violanti, a 23-year veteran of the New York State Police. "We anticipate that data from this research will lead to police-department-centered interventions to reduce the risk of disease in this stressful occupation."

Violanti and colleagues are using measures of cortisol, known as the "stress hormone," to determine if stress is associated with physiological risk factors that can lead to serious health problems such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

"When cortisol becomes dysregulated due to chronic stress, it opens a person to disease," said Violanti. "The body becomes physiologically unbalanced, organs are attacked, and the immune system is compromised as well. It's unfortunate, but that's what stress does to us."

The investigation's two most recent studies report on the effect of shift work on stress and suicide risk in police officers, and on male/female differences in stress and possible signs of cardiovascular disease.

Results of the shift work pilot study, involving 115 randomly selected officers, showed that suicidal thoughts were higher in women working the day shift, and in men working the afternoon/night shifts. The findings appear online in the October issue of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.

Data showed that 23 percent of male and 25 percent of female officers reported more suicidal thoughts than the general population (13.5 percent). In a previous study, suicide rates were three times higher in police than in other municipal workers, Violanti found.

The findings, that in women officers working day shifts were more likely to be related to depression and suicide ideation, while in men working the afternoon or night shift was related to PTSD and depression, were surprising, said Violanti. "We thought both men and women officers would be negatively affected by midnight shifts."

"It's possible women may feel more uneasy and stressed in a daytime shift, where there can be more opportunity for conflict and a negative environment," he said. "On the other hand, higher suicide ideation reported by males on the midnight shift may be accounted for in part by a stronger need to be part of the social cohesiveness associated with peers in the police organization. Working alone at night without the support of immediate backup can be stressful," he said.

"There also is the problem of physiological disruption of circadian rhythms. Being awake all night while one should be sleeping can affect judgment and decision making. The combination of these two has a double-barreled stress effect."

Violanti is planning to conduct a longitudinal study of the effects of shift work on officers, and has received additional funds from NIOSH to study the effects of shift work on cancer risk.

The stress and blood vessel reactivity research found that females had higher cortisol levels upon awakening, and that levels remained high throughout the day. Normally, cortisol is highest in the morning and decreases to a low point in the evening. These constantly high cortisol levels were associated with less arterial elasticity, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study is in press in Psychiatry Research.

Violanti said these findings, once again, reflect the impact of police work on women officers. "Women police officers are probably under more stress than male officers. It's still basically a male occupation, and women can feel socially isolated on the job. Also, most women have more home responsibilities to worry about – family, child care."

Publishing papers and conducting studies about stress may not change police departments overnight, Violanti admits, but it is one way of getting the message out that the negative effects of stress must be acknowledged, de-stigmatized and treated.

"Intervention is necessary to help officers deal with this difficult and stressful occupation," he said. "We want to educate them on how to survive 25 years of police work. They need to learn how to relax, how to think differently about things they experience as a cop. There is such a thing as post-traumatic growth. People can grow in a positive way and be better cops and persons after they survive the trauma of police work. That is an important message."
post #566 of 6077

thanks for the anwser

post #567 of 6077
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Seriously you get stopped twice a week? What is the bullshit excuse why?

It's profiling. They say I look like a suspect, and ask if I am on parole. Or they say there has been some burglaries in the neighborhood, and are just checking people who they have not seen there before. This happens when I visit the whiter areas of Los Angeles. LAPD has not stopped me in a while. The cities with funding for their police department are the ones who usually stop me. For example Burbank.

I just stay calm, and after they check with their computer it's over. Takes like 5 minutes. Do not ask why they stopped me, and don't care. Not going to argue with those people. I know they are scared and the last thing I want is to make them feel even more nervous and have to take them on. I am in a pretty much no win situation.

If you guys get stopped just stay calm. Most of the time is not a big deal, and it isn't worth stressing about. If your home gets raided... that's another story.
post #568 of 6077
post #569 of 6077
WARNING GRAPHIC: Brazilian woman dragged behind police SUV



Quote:
A Brazilian woman shot and then dragged behind a cop car has led to three cops in handcuffs and the president of the country saying she is “shocked” at the horror.

Mother-of-four Claudia Ferreira da Silva, 38, was caught in a shootout involving police Sunday morning in the slums of Rio de Janeiro, BBC News reported.

Cops threw her in the trunk of their SUV bound for a nearby hospital. Her body fell out as the police peeled off and was dragged for more than 1,000 feet.

Another driver captured the horrifying sight on cellphone video — including when the cops got out and tossed her body back into their ride.

She was dead upon arrival at the hospital.

The cops were arrested for “disciplinary transgression” and may face more charges, according to Rio de Janeiro authorities.

“Claudia’s death shocked the country,” Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff tweeted Tuesday. “(She) had four children, had been married 20 years and woke up in early in the morning to go work at a hospital in Rio.

“At this time of sadness and pain, I stand with Claudia’s family and friends,” Rousseff added.

Da Silva’s family was outraged, and protests rocked her neighborhood of Congonha.

"They thought she was a criminal and that is why they took her away. It wasn't to save her life," her daughter, Tais Lima, said according to BBC News.

"They grabbed my mother by the legs and dumped her in the boot like an animal. They didn't even bother to check if the boot was properly closed. That is not the attitude of someone who is trying to help.”
post #570 of 6077
Best and Brightest.
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