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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 16

post #226 of 6093
Police sergeants arrested after allegedly robbing men in Detroit

Quote:
DETROIT (WJBK) -
A Good Samaritan snapped photos of what appeared to be two men impersonating police officers involved in a pistol-whipping and robbery outside a Citgo gas station on Detroit's east side on July 21.

Once Fox 2 aired those photos, an even more disturbing picture developed.

"Several unidentified police officers were working this particular robbery case, recognized one of the suspects in the photographs as being a member of the Detroit Police Department," Chief James Craig said Monday.

Now under arrest are two police sergeants, a 47-year-old officer and 20-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department and his 42-year-old buddy from the police academy, who is a former DPD cop and 17-year veteran of the St. Clair Shores Police Department. The later recently received a distinguished service award.

"In fact, they were police officers, just not working on-duty at the time," Craig said.

One of the alleged victims identified the St. Clair Shores sergeant from a photo lineup.

It is alleged the two sergeants pulled up in a black pickup, got out of the truck with their guns drawn and their badges around their necks, detained two young men in their early twenties, searched them and pistol-whipped one of them, stealing his wallet and cell phone. The other alleged victim told police they also stole his money.

"At this time, there is no evidence to support that both sergeants were involved in any other police impersonation cases that have been reported in recent weeks," Craig said. "Know that if we have officers engaging in criminal misconduct that we will investigate. We will always be transparent about this business and making sure that our community is aware of how we're conducting our investigations."

The Detroit police sergeant was arrested at work at the 12th Precinct on Saturday. The St. Clair Shores sergeant was picked up at his home.

While a warrant has been submitted to the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office, no charges have yet been authorized.

Meanwhile, the attorney for the St. Clair Shores sergeant said this case is not at all what it seems and that the alleged victims are far from innocent.

"I think there is going to be a totally different story to this case. These are two highly decorated police officers. They're not rogue cops. They're not cops out on the street trying to take down innocent people," said Todd Flood.

Sources said the teenage daughter of the St. Clair Shores sergeant was recently robbed of her cell phone and that the two officers were tracking down the people responsible. Flood would not confirm or deny that.

"This is a situation where there's more to it than what meets the eye or what's being reported," he said.



Read more: http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/22949343/breaking-news-police#ixzz2aUncqtky
post #227 of 6093
I just read about that. I would say it's unbelievable but it is Detroit.
post #228 of 6093
Here's one you'll love from the Great White North, Harvey. Teenager exposes himself on public transit, pulls out a small knife, everyone leaves the streetcar, then cops shoot him nine times and throw in a Tasering after for good measure:
post #229 of 6093
Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Bardamu View Post

Here's one you'll love from the Great White North, Harvey. Teenager exposes himself on public transit, pulls out a small knife, everyone leaves the streetcar, then cops shoot him nine times and throw in a Tasering after for good measure:

The full story has yet to come out but this is really not going over well. Toronto's police chief took the very unusual step of speaking publicly about this tragedy despite the fact that an internal investigation was immediately launched. He seems to have realized that the usual stonewall approach wouldn't work this time since he acknowledged that the public had justifiable concerns.
post #230 of 6093
^That was a legit shoot for the first 3 rounds, or as long as the guy was still standing.
post #231 of 6093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duff_Man View Post

^That was a legit shoot for the first 3 rounds, or as long as the guy was still standing.

Wrong, that was not a justified shooting. The kid was on the bus by himself and it appeared he did not advance on the cops at all. In any case, even if one could make a self defense claim that went to hell in a hand basket when the cop opened fire again. The cop who did this is a POS and they should hang the bastard.
post #232 of 6093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

it appeared he did not advance on the cops at all.

That's the sticking point.
post #233 of 6093
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

I just read about that. I would say it's unbelievable but it is Detroit.

+1
post #234 of 6093
I guess Austin PD now has their own Minority Report PreCrime unit too:


Quote:
Man Who Austin Cop Chased, Shot, Killed Not Suspected of Any Particular Crime But May Have Been Up to No Good

Another harrowing adventure in modern policing, where every encounter can turn suddenly, inexplicably, pointlessly fatal--for the person the cop encounters.

At a press conference Monday afternoon,Austin Police Assistant Chief Brian Manleyacknowledged that the fatal shooting Friday of Larry Eugene Jackson, Jr. by an APD detective was more complicated than initially described....

Manley said police are "confident" that Jackson – shot and killed by APD Detective Charles Kleinert on Friday afternoon – had come to the Benchmark Bank where the detective was investigating an earlier (unrelated) robbery to "commit a fraud" and was not there to conduct any legitimate business.

Jackson misidentified himself when he was questioned by the bank manager that afternoon outside the bank on West 35th Street. Jackson had previously tried to enter the bank, police said, but the door was locked because of the ongoing robbery investigation. Jackson briefly left, police say, then returned and tried again to enter the bank before he was confronted by the manager, who in turn told Kleinert, who was inside the bank conducting a follow-up investigation of the morning robbery, about the exchange. Kleinert went outside to talk with Jackson and after a two- or three-minute conversation – captured by surveillance cameras – Jackson fled, police say.

Although police say they've ruled out any connection between Jackson and the robber who struck the facility that morning....Manley told reporters at a Monday press briefing that they are nonetheless certain that Jackson was up to no good.

So, then Kleinert commandeered a citizen's car to drive after Jackson--the motorist in question found Kleinert's behavior bizarre and disturbing and "out of control"--and when he drove around and saw Jackson walking on a sidewalk, he:

followed Jackson under the bridge near the Shoal Creek Trail and there a scuffle ensued; Jackson was shot once, in the back of the neck. He died just before 4:30 pm, police said. Manley said police are still trying to determine what happened during the altercation and whether Kleinert's gun was fired "intentionally or accidentally."

Police couldn't really explain exactly how or why they thought the dead man was going to "commit a fraud" on the bank.

And what is APD policy on such chasing of people suspected of being suspicious?.

"flight by a subject who is not suspected of criminal activity shall not serve as the sole justification for engaging in a foot pursuit without the development of reasonable suspicion regarding the individual's involvement in criminal activity," reads APD's policy on foot pursuit.


http://reason.com/blog/2013/07/30/man-who-austin-cop-chased-shot-killed-no
post #235 of 6093
"Although police say they've ruled out any connection between Jackson and the robber who struck the facility that morning....Manley told reporters at a Monday press briefing that they are nonetheless certain that Jackson was up to no good".

Certainly enough reason to kill a man. If they just "thought" he was up to no good and were not "certain" then he should have been accorded the courtesy of a warning shot to his knee or something.
post #236 of 6093
And on the other, more encouraging end of the spectrum:

Quote:
Rialto, CA Police Made to Wear Cameras, Use of Force Drops by Over Two-Thirds

When cops in a Rialto, California were forced to wear cameras, their use of force dropped by over two-thirds. Additionally, the officers who were not made to wear the cameras used force twice as much as those who did. This strongly suggests the majority of the time police use force is unnecessary. In other words, the majority of the time these officers used force they were simply committing acts of violence which they don't feel comfortable committing if it's captured on film.

From The New York Times:

HERE'S a fraught encounter: one police officer, one civilian and anger felt by one or both. Afterward, it may be hard to sort out who did what to whom.

Now, some police departments are using miniaturized video cameras and their microphones to capture, in full detail, officers' interactions with civilians. The cameras are so small that they can be attached to a collar, a cap or even to the side of an officer's sunglasses. High-capacity battery packs can last for an extended shift. And all of the videos are uploaded automatically to a central server that serves as a kind of digital evidence locker.

William A. Farrar, the police chief in Rialto, Calif., has been investigating whether officers' use of video cameras can bring measurable benefits to relations between the police and civilians. Officers in Rialto, which has a population of about 100,000, already carry Taser weapons equipped with small video cameras that activate when the weapon is armed, and the officers have long worn digital audio recorders.

But when Mr. Farrar told his uniformed patrol officers of his plans to introduce the new, wearable video cameras, "it wasn't the easiest sell," he said, especially to some older officers who initially were "questioning why 'big brother' should see everything they do."

He said he reminded them that civilians could use their cellphones to record interactions, "so instead of relying on somebody else's partial picture of what occurred, why not have your own?" he asked. "In this way, you have the real one."

Last year, Mr. Farrar used the new wearable video cameras to conduct a continuing experiment in his department, in collaboration with Barak Ariel, a visiting fellow at the Institute of Criminology at the University of Cambridge and an assistant professor at Hebrew University.

Half of Rialto's uniformed patrol officers on each week's schedule have been randomly assigned the cameras, also made by Taser International. Whenever officers wear the cameras, they are expected to activate them when they leave the patrol car to speak with a civilian.

A convenient feature of the camera is its "pre-event video buffer," which continuously records and holds the most recent 30 seconds of video when the camera is off. In this way, the initial activity that prompts the officer to turn on the camera is more likely to be captured automatically, too.

THE Rialto study began in February 2012 and will run until this July. The results from the first 12 months are striking. Even with only half of the 54 uniformed patrol officers wearing cameras at any given time, the department over all had an 88 percent decline in the number of complaints filed against officers, compared with the 12 months before the study, to 3 from 24.

Rialto's police officers also used force nearly 60 percent less often -- in 25 instances, compared with 61. When force was used, it was twice as likely to have been applied by the officers who weren't wearing cameras during that shift, the study found. And, lest skeptics think that the officers with cameras are selective about which encounters they record, Mr. Farrar noted that those officers who apply force while wearing a camera have always captured the incident on video.

As small as the cameras are, they seem to be noticeable to civilians, he said. "When you look at an officer," he said, "it kind of sticks out." Citizens have sometimes asked officers, "Hey, are you wearing a camera?" and the officers say they are, he reported.

But what about the privacy implications? Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst at the American Civil Liberties Union, says: "We don't like the networks of police-run video cameras that are being set up in an increasing number of cities. We don't think the government should be watching over the population en masse." But requiring police officers to wear video cameras is different, he says: "When it comes to the citizenry watching the government, we like that."

Mr. Stanley says that all parties stand to benefit -- the public is protected from police misconduct, and officers are protected from bogus complaints. "There are many police officers who've had a cloud fall over them because of an unfounded accusation of abuse," he said. "Now police officers won't have to worry so much about that kind of thing."
post #237 of 6093
Quote:
Originally Posted by burningbright View Post

And on the other, more encouraging end of the spectrum:

Soon there will be people complaining the cops are recording them without consent with these cameras.
post #238 of 6093
Rialto is a shithole of a city. A friend of mine is a firefighter there. I don't know how he does it. Luckily he said they stopped getting calls from one house where the resident was so fat that his unit would have to go to the house, and move the guy from the bathroom to his bed when he'd get stuck in the door, or not have enough energy to pick himself up off the floor.
post #239 of 6093
Quote:
But when Mr. Farrar told his uniformed patrol officers of his plans to introduce the new, wearable video cameras, "it wasn't the easiest sell," he said, especially to some older officers who initially were "questioning why 'big brother' should see everything they do."

Lololololol, "Big Brother to Bigger Brother, why you spying on me when I'm trying to spy on our Little Brother?"
post #240 of 6093
Yeah that line made me wince. If there is anyone whose actions ARE a matter of public interest, it's an on-duty police officer.
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