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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 15

post #211 of 6071
Quote:
When you're a police officer searching for a suspect who you believe has taken shelter at an apartment complex, of course you politely knock on the doors of the residents, most or all of whom must be innocent, and politely show them a photo— Oh, who am I kidding? Polite cops are so old fashioned. Of course you put together a massive tactical team, point guns in kitchen windows, brutalize the inhabitants, and then take offense when somebody has the nerve to call a reporter.

From the Sarasota Herald-Tribune:

After leaving her operating room scrub nurse duties at Sarasota's Doctors Hospital on Wednesday, Louise Goldsberry went to her Hidden Lake Village apartment.

Her boyfriend came over, and after dinner — about 8 p.m. — Goldsberry went to her kitchen sink to wash some dishes.

That's when her boyfriend, Craig Dorris — a manager for a security alarm company — heard her scream and saw her drop to the floor.

Goldsberry, 59, said she had looked up from the sink to see a man “wearing a hunting vest.”

He was aiming a gun at her face, with a red light pinpointing her.

“I screamed and screamed,” she said.

But she also scrambled across the floor to her bedroom and grabbed her gun, a five-shot .38-caliber revolver. Goldsberry has a concealed weapons permit and says the gun has made her feel safer living alone. But she felt anything but safe when she heard a man yelling to open the door.

He was claiming to be a police officer, but the man she had seen looked to her more like an armed thug. Her boyfriend, Dorris, was calmer, and yelled back that he wanted to see some ID.

Note that the officer at the door, Matt Wiggins of the US Marshal's fugitive division, responded to the request that he prove his claim to be a police officer by cursing and threatening to shoot the frightened couple.

Dorris ultimately took the plunge and emerged to establish the raiders' identity. He found 30 or so marshals and Sarasota cops who handcuffed him, ransacked the apartment once Goldsberry emerged (she was also cuffed), showed the photo of the suspected child-rapist they actually wanted, and then left.

The journalist Goldsberry called, Tom Lyons, seems to have a refreshingly skeptical attitude toward law enforcement behavior for a modern newspaper reporter.

The tip was never about Goldsberry's apartment, specifically, Wiggins acknowledged. It was about the complex.

But when the people in Goldsberry's apartment didn't open up, that told Wiggins he had probably found the right door. No one at other units had reacted that way, he said.

Maybe none of them had a gun pointed at them through the kitchen window, I suggested. But Wiggins didn't think that was much excuse for the woman's behavior. He said he acted with restraint and didn't like having that gun aimed at him.

“I went above and beyond,” Wiggins said. “I have to go home at night.”

Goldsberry was at home, I said. She had a gun pointed at her, too, and she wasn't wearing body armor and behind a shield. She had no reason to expect police or think police would ever aim into her kitchen and cuss at her through her door to get in. It seemed crazy. She was panicked.

“We were clearly the police,” Wiggins insisted. “She can't say she didn't know.”

She does say so, actually.

Ultimately, Marshal Wiggins is upset that he has to answer a reporter's questions about his conduct while conducting a sweep through an apartment complex in a peaceful Florida city.

Goldsberry wasn't arrested or shot despite pointing a gun at a cop, so Wiggins said, “She sure shouldn't be going to the press.”

Let's hope Wiggins and his hopped-up gang don't decide to shoot first, in the future, just to avoid dealing with unpleasant reports in the press.
Quote:
“I feel bad for her,” Wiggins conceded, finally. “But at the same time, I had to reasonably believe the bad guy was in her house based on what they were doing.”

Yes, when cops show up without a warrant in full military assault gear and demand entrance to your home and you balk at that command it is reasonable to assume you're doing something wrong.
post #212 of 6071
How can they get a warrant to search an entire apartment complex? Other than a terroristic threat that seems ridiculous to me.
post #213 of 6071
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchausen View Post

How can they get a warrant to search an entire apartment complex? Other than a terroristic threat that seems ridiculous to me.

From what I'm reading they didn't have a warrant. They went knocking door to door and everybody else cheerfully opened the door and let the military in. These were the only people who didn't immediately comply, ergo they are guilty, and then the cops bust the place up looking for someone who wasn't there. They found him later in an entirely different part of the city.

http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20130722/COLUMNIST/130729895/2055/NEWS?Title=Lyons-In-police-raid-did-federal-agent-break-the-law-
Quote:
Never mind that he was in her apartment on bad information and bad guesses, had no warrant to enter, and that Goldsberry didn't know he was a cop and had never even heard of the man the agent sought.
post #214 of 6071
Well I certainly hope that cop gets a suspension with pay.
post #215 of 6071
Quote:
July 17, 2013 |
SAN ANTONIO, Texas (CN) - A police officer for a Texas school district may have used excessive force in fatally shooting a teenager who fled the scene of a fistfight, a federal judge ruled.
Denys Lopez Moreno sued Officer Daniel Alvarado, Police Chief John Page and the Northside Independent School District in September 2011 for the death of her 14-year-old son, Derek Lopez.
The incident unfolded on Nov. 12, 2010, when Lopez allegedly exited a school bus and, in view of Alvardo, punched another student.
Lopez ignored Alvarado's order to freeze and fled the scene with the school officer tailing him in a patrol car, according to the amended complaint.
With Lopez hiding in a shed at a nearby home, Alvarado drove back to the scene of the fight but allegedly refused to give up the search.
"Ignoring his supervisor's orders to 'stay with the victim and get the information from him,' Alvarado placed the second boy into the patrol car and sped into the neighborhood to search for Derek," the complaint states.
Local homeowners then directed Alvarado to the shed, Moreno claimed.
"In violation of NISD police department procedures, Alvarado drew his weapon immediately after exiting the patrol car," the complaint states. "With his gun drawn, he rushed through the gate and into the back yard. Within seconds from arriving at the residence, Alvarado shot and killed the unarmed boy hiding in the shed."
Moreno said the officer had a history of disregarding orders.
"In approximately a four (4) year period leading up to the shooting, defendant Alvarado had been reprimanded sixteen (16) times," according to the complaint. "Specifically, he had been reprimanded for insubordination and failure to follow supervisors' directives seven (7) times. Due to his poor service record, Alvarado was suspended without pay on five (5) occasions. On May 21, 2008, Alvarado was recommended for termination by Page. Despite being recommended for termination for insubordination and for refusal to follow supervisor directives, Alvarado remained on the force without remedial training."
U.S. District Judge Xavier Rodriguez granted the school district and Page summary judgment on Friday, but he refused to dismiss the claims of excessive force and negligence against Alvarado.

Obviously the kid was a threat to him because he had just punched another kid.
post #216 of 6071

Quote:
Joseph Derrico, circled in the center, retired at age 43 from the Hamilton Police Department claiming disability due to a leg injury but since then he's been featured in truTV's Jersey-based reality repo truck show "Bear Swamp Recovery."
Quote:
Former township police officer Joseph Derrico has lost his tax-free disability pension following an examination by doctors that found him no longer permanently disabled, officials said yesterday.

The state Police and Firemen’s Retirement System board of trustees voted unanimously on Monday that Derrico’s disability did not exist anymore, and suspended his $5,808.61 monthly payouts.

Derrico resigned from the force in October 2010, three months after he was indicted on a charge of receiving stolen property. He applied for and was accepted into a disability retirement worth $70,000 annually, but when video of him running after a monster truck and wrestling on a reality TV show surfaced earlier this year, the PFRS board ordered an investigation.

In most disability cases, Monday’s vote would clear an employee to go back to work, but Derrico’s resignation remains in effect, Hamilton business administrator John Ricci said.

“So he resigned with disciplinary charges pending, which happens,” Ricci said. “We don’t have to take him back … but he doesn’t have a pension anymore.”

The suspension of Derrico’s pension is a first for the agency, said John Sierchio, a Bloomfield police sergeant and member of the PFRS board of trustees.

“People see this type of fraud, and it really opens up their eyes,” he said.

Derrico co-owned Hiram’s Gold and Coin Exchange on North Olden Avenue in Ewing, where in 2010 Hamilton detectives traced jewelry stolen during a township burglary. Some of the items were recovered, but Derrico allegedly told the victim of the burglary as she stood next to the investigating detectives that the more valuable pieces were likely accidentally thrown away.

Following an Internal Affairs investigation, the 20-year law enforcement veteran was indicted on the receiving stolen property charge. A criminal case was never brought, and Derrico’s resignation led the departmental charges to be dropped, according to a letter from the township’s law director released to The Times as part of an Open Public Records Act request.

Derrico was collecting his disability pension while he was cast as a minor character in the reality TV show “Bear Swamp Recovery.” Portions of the show about Mercer County repo men, one of whom was Derrico’s partner in the gold buying business, were posted to YouTube recently and show him running, wrestling and grappling.
“When this first came out, we had him re-evaluated,” Sierchio said.

Derrico was sent back to the doctor who originally examined him, and the doctor said Derrico was no longer disabled. The decision was sustained by a medical review board made up exclusively of medical professionals before it was sent to the PFRS board for approval.

Sierchio, who spent 17 years as a union representative, said towns and law enforcement agencies use disability retirements as enticements for officers facing criminal charges to leave the job.

Wow, a cop faking an injury to collect disability. Who ever heard of such a thing?

His injury is almost as fake as the show -
post #217 of 6071
Tell me, how do I get a pension plan worth 100% of my salary? No wonder cities are going broke.
post #218 of 6071
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

From what I'm reading they didn't have a warrant. They went knocking door to door and everybody else cheerfully opened the door and let the military in. These were the only people who didn't immediately comply, ergo they are guilty, and then the cops bust the place up looking for someone who wasn't there. They found him later in an entirely different part of the city.

http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20130722/COLUMNIST/130729895/2055/NEWS?Title=Lyons-In-police-raid-did-federal-agent-break-the-law-

Would've been nice if she was able to shoot back.
post #219 of 6071
More WTF-ery going on in Tiger country:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=zGeZiWOeGIc


Quote:
Cop Fired for Speaking Out Against Ticket and Arrest Quotas

Auburn, Alabama is home to sprawling plains, Auburn University, and a troubling police force. After the arrival of a new police chief in 2010, the department entered an era of ticket quotas and worse.

“When I first heard about the quotas I was appalled,” says former Auburn police officer Justin Hanners, who claims he and other cops were given directives to hassle, ticket, or arrest specific numbers of residents per shift. “I got into law enforcement to serve and protect, not be a bully.”

Hanners blew the whistle on the department’s tactics and was eventually fired for refusing to comply and keep quiet. He says that each officer was required to make 100 contacts each month, which included tickets, arrests, field interviews, and warnings. This equates to 72,000 contacts a year in a 50,000 person town. His claims are backed up by audio recordings of his superiors he made. The Auburn police department declined requests to be interviewed for this story.

“There are not that many speeders, there are not that many people running red lights to get those numbers, so what [the police] do is they lower their standards,” says Hanners. That led to the department encouraging officers to arrest people that Hanners “didn’t feel like had broken the law.”

Former Reason staffer Radley Balko, now an investigative reporter for the Huffington Post and author of the new book, Rise of the Warrior Cop, says that this isn’t just a nuisance, it infringes on public safety.

“You have a policy that encourages police to create petty crimes and ignore serious crimes, and that’s clearly the opposite of what we want our police to be doing,” says Balko.

Hanners repeatedly voiced his concerns through his chain of command, and the department responded that these requirements are necessary for increasing productivity.

Yet Hanners firmly believes that the quotas are entirely revenue driven.

“I had no intention of dropping it,” says Hanners, “This is a problem in more places than Auburn, and I think once the people know that they can hold their public officials accountable, it’ll change.”

The police chief singled out by Hanners retired this July, citing medical reasons.
post #220 of 6071
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxgenius View Post

Would've been nice if she was able to shoot back.

Had she done so there's no doubt in my mind they would have shot her dead on the spot and the department would have ruled it a justified shooting since she wouldn't be here to contradict them.
post #221 of 6071
I'm sure there's more to that story, but if the cop's point really is that if he knocks on a door and nobody answers he suddenly has some kind of probable cause, that is some straight up new jack horse shit.
post #222 of 6071
and considering that the it was a justifiable shooting when the cops shot a guy 41 times when he was reaching for his wallet, I have no doubt they would come out of shooting this lady, and probably her boyfriend, just fine.
post #223 of 6071
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchausen View Post

I'm sure there's more to that story, but if the cop's point really is that if he knocks on a door and nobody answers he suddenly has some kind of probable cause, that is some straight up new jack horse shit.

Maybe. We never know in these cases because the cops always close ranks and cover everything up.

But even from the cop's own statements, he admits he didn't have a warrant.
post #224 of 6071
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Maybe. We never know in these cases because the cops always close ranks and cover everything up.

But even from the cop's own statements, he admits he didn't have a warrant.

Warrants are such an old, quaint notion.
post #225 of 6071
Sadly, it appears you are correct.
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