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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 130

post #1936 of 6227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasmade View Post

http://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2015-dangerous-jobs/

So according to this article, you're more likely to die from violence if you're a taxi driver or chauffeur and being a garbage man is generally more dangerous than a police officer.


I'd question that. Doesn't appear they take into account deaths from mental illness such as suicides, overdoses from stolen drugs, or getting beaten to death by a spouse, all of which might push cops over the top.
post #1937 of 6227
Actually the numbers are flawed for a different reason -- not all cops have the same job but they all get counted as police.

I doubt they're counting executives at waste control companies as garbage collectors.
post #1938 of 6227
Quote:
When the Institute for Justice helped bring attention to an outrageous IRS money grab in North Carolina, the federal prosecutor assigned to the case was peeved. "Your client needs to resolve this or litigate it," Assistant U.S. Attorney Steve West wrote in an email message. "But publicity about it doesn't help. It just ratchets up feelings in the agency. My offer is to return 50% of the money. The offer is good until March 30th COB." That deadline came and went, but Lyndon McLellan, the convenience store owner who lost $107,000 to the IRS because it considered his bank deposits suspiciously small, refused to fold. That turned out to be a smart move, because West was bluffing. Yesterday the government agreed to drop the case and return all of McLellan's money.

"I'm relieved to be getting my money back," McLellan says. "What's wrong is wrong, and what the government did here is wrong. I just hope that by standing up for what's right, it means this won't happen to other people.”

It is unlikely McLellan would have prevailed without the publicity that I.J. brought to the case, which seemed to violate IRS and Justice Department policies regarding forfeitures based on allegations of "structuring," i.e., making deposits of less than $10,000 to avoid bank reporting requirements. Both agencies had said they would no longer pursue such forfeitures unless there was evidence that the money came from illegal sources. In McLellan's case there was no such evidence. He paid an accountant $19,000 to help prove that all the money came from his perfectly legal business.

The government is not compensating McLellan for that expense, or for the $3,000 retainer he paid a lawyer before I.J. took on the case pro bono. Nor is it paying interest on the money, which it held for more than a year. "The government cannot turn Lyndon's life upside down and then walk away as if nothing happened," says Robert Everett Johnson, an I.J. attorney who represents McLellan. "Lyndon should not have to pay for the government's lapse in judgment. And the government certainly should not profit from its misbehavior by keeping the interest that it earned while holding Lyndon's money. We'll continue to litigate this case until the government makes Lyndon whole."

I.J. has pressured the government to back down in several other structuring cases. The new policies adopted by the IRS in October and by the DOJ in March are largely attributable to the publicity I.J. has generated—especially a front-page New York Times story last fall. McLellan's case was especially striking because the government refused to return his money even after the new policies were announced. While testifying before a congressional committee last fall, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said any forfeiture without allegations of illegal activity beyond structuring "is not following the policy."


Suck a dick, tax cops. I hope they get sued and have to commit seppuku.
post #1939 of 6227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Actually the numbers are flawed for a different reason -- not all cops have the same job but they all get counted as police.

I doubt they're counting executives at waste control companies as garbage collectors.

Difference being most people working in a PD probably started out as a typical cop of some sort before doing something else within the PD. The CEO of Waste Management never actually picked up trash on the side of the street as a job and worked his way up to an executive.
post #1940 of 6227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasmade View Post

Difference being most people working in a PD probably started out as a typical cop of some sort before doing something else within the PD. The CEO of Waste Management never actually picked up trash on the side of the street as a job and worked his way up to an executive.

I know that, but it doesn't change my point. How about they do another of these charts for beat cops in urban areas? Bet the result would be different.
post #1941 of 6227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I know that, but it doesn't change my point. How about they do another of these charts for beat cops in urban areas? Bet the result would be different.


Probably not. If anything, their kill to be killed ratio would just be higher.
post #1942 of 6227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post


That's a weird one, since it affects the poor (<25k combined income) and the high income people (>250k combined income) and almost no one else.

And anyone with student loan debt. The married deduction for student loan payments is the same as individuals.
post #1943 of 6227
http://miami.cbslocal.com/2015/05/06/race-matters-part-1-tired-of-them-abusing-their-authority/
Quote:
MIAMI (CBSMiami) — On August 27th, a group of plain clothes Miami-Dade police officers pulled onto a dead-end street in South Dade and arrested three young black men after finding a single marijuana cigarette on the ground near where the trio was standing.

Two of the men were released on the spot after being given notices to appear in court. The third person, however, was placed in handcuffs and loaded into one of the unmarked cars.

Why did the officers take 21-year-old Tannie Burke? According to Burke, the officers were angry because Burke’s stepfather, Marvin Armstrong, was videotaping the arrest as well as berating the officers and accusing them of racial profiling.

Burke claims instead of taking him to jail or to the South District police station, the officers took Burke for a ride, during which they repeatedly complained about his stepfather’s actions.

“They said, `your step father got a lot of mouth. You know we don’t like that,'” Burke recalled.

After twenty minutes, Burke said they dropped him off on the edge of some darkened farmland miles from his house.

“They put me off somewhere in Goulds,” Burke recounted. “There were no street lights and no houses. It was just dark.”

Burke’s allegations would be troubling by themselves. They become startling, however when one detail is added: Burke is legally blind.

It would take Tannie Burke the better part of an hour to find his way home with help from a stranger. The incident is now under investigation by Internal Affairs. Nevertheless, CBS4 News began to hear other stories regarding this same group of plain clothes police officers who comprise what is known as a Crime Suppression Team (CST).

Quality harassment of a blind person. Good job, Miami PD.
post #1944 of 6227
Legally blind doesn't mean you're actually blind.
post #1945 of 6227
No shit.

Does it excuse their behavior at all though?
post #1946 of 6227
No shit, indeed. He describes the scene where they let him out.

Is there some reason you guys can't complain about the cops without exaggerating or misrepresenting every incident?
post #1947 of 6227
Have you ever seen a case of police misconduct you didn't wholeheartedly endorse? If I recall correctly, you were even trying to explain away the Walter Scott shooting.

Legally blind is defined as having 20/200 or worse corrected vision. That's 1/10 of normal vision. Seems blind enough to me.
post #1948 of 6227
The definition of legal blindness varies, and as with any disability that gets you a government check, there is no shortage of malingerers. Legal blindness does not equate to actual blindness; there are probably 20 legally blind people for every actually blind one.

And I can correct misinformation or explore defenses (as in the Walter Scott case) without "wholeheartedly endorsing" what happened.
post #1949 of 6227
Ata sucks cop dick on every occasion possible because he lives a simple life and has never broken a law and found himself at the mercy of a police thug. He's speaking from a position of ignorance so you can't expect him to understand these things. It's almost as if he is legally blind to police abuse because he hasn't seen it, he believes it doesn't exist.
post #1950 of 6227
Also, that Miami PD story reminds me of the very end of the Kurosawa movie Ran, which is easily the very best final minute of any movie ever made of all time.

But not a good date movie, as it's a bit of a downer.
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