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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 127

post #1891 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

The people locked up are mostly non-violent drug offenders. Please protect me from these people. I actually think it makes us less safe for a very simple to understand reason: it diverts police resources from violent crimes. How many federal, state, and local police officers are used to combat drugs or prostitution?

When we decreased the legal limit for drunk driving, we saw an increase is DUI deaths (but more arrests! Yay!). Why? Because cops are no longer focusing on those who are clearly drunk driving and instead setting up checkpoints to arrest everyone who are at .08 or above.


I understand that more policing can have unintended consequences.

As far as non-violent offenders, I would rather not have car thieves, burglars, and scam artists running around preying on working people. If they can't live in society, well, they can't live in society. Time to go to prison, so we can help these people get dressed in the morning, eat at regular intervals, and have free play. Little kids go to time out. Big kids go to prison.

He said " decriminalize drugs and other victimless crimes", and "The people locked up are mostly non-violent drug offenders" not decriminalize theft, burglary, and fraud.
post #1892 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

He said " decriminalize drugs and other victimless crimes", and "The people locked up are mostly non-violent drug offenders" not decriminalize theft, burglary, and fraud.

I thought he was focusing on non-violent crimes, but I see your point there. Drug users can use drugs in their own home as long as they don't blow things up, fall asleep on their babies, use medicaid, or mess with my stuff. When they arent' puffing on the heroin, they need to be out working, and visit the dentist regularly. I don't want to see ugly teeth.
post #1893 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

I understand that more policing can have unintended consequences.

As far as non-violent offenders, I would rather not have car thieves, burglars, and scam artists running around preying on working people. If they can't live in society, well, they can't live in society. Time to go to prison, so we can help these people get dressed in the morning, eat at regular intervals, and have free play. Little kids go to time out. Big kids go to prison.

One of the following is not like the other:
  • Paying someone to give you a bj
  • Eating some magic mushrooms
  • Stealing a car

The first two don't harm anyone - no natural rights have been violated. In fact, arguably #1 is already legal as long as a third is the payer. The third is a property crime and thus violates the victim's natural rights. You know better and you're needlessly dumbing down the argument.
post #1894 of 6095
Notably, the person being paid to give a bj is doing so cause he/she prefers magic mushrooms to a job.
post #1895 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

One of the following is not like the other:
  • Paying someone to give you a bj
  • Eating some magic mushrooms
  • Stealing a car

The first two don't harm anyone - no natural rights have been violated. In fact, arguably #1 is already legal as long as a third is the payer. The third is a property crime and thus violates the victim's natural rights. You know better and you're needlessly dumbing down the argument.


I think I agree with you; people can take qualudes in the privacy of their own home. Just don't walk around intoxicated in public, or try to eat people (mushrooms/bath salts), or get on the public dole.
post #1896 of 6095
Real Qualudes don't exist anymore. Except for the 10, 000 Rorer 714s I put in a safe deposit box in 1977.
post #1897 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post

Real Qualudes don't exist anymore. Except for the 10, 000 Rorer 714s I put in a safe deposit box in 1977.

Good times.



Good times.
post #1898 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

I think I agree with you; people can take qualudes in the privacy of their own home. Just don't walk around intoxicated in public, or try to eat people (mushrooms/bath salts), or get on the public dole.


Bath salts and mushrooms don't cause people to become cannibals, that was bullshit cop lies. People with mental illness try to eat other people.
post #1899 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harold falcon View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

I think I agree with you; people can take qualudes in the privacy of their own home. Just don't walk around intoxicated in public, or try to eat people (mushrooms/bath salts), or get on the public dole.


Bath salts and mushrooms don't cause people to become cannibals, that was bullshit cop lies. People with mental illness try to eat other people.

And also I don't think anyone suggested decriminalizing cannibalism.
post #1900 of 6095
Quote:
Law enforcement agencies in the state of New Mexico may not be able to seize citizens' assets without charging them with a crime, thanks to a new law signed last month. But said law means nothing to federal law enforcement agencies. While the Department of Justice investigates alleged racist police practices in Baltimore, the agency's wayward child, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), is snatching the life savings of a young black male for the crime of being alone on a train.

The man, Joseph Rivers, 22, was traveling from Michigan to Los Angeles by train with $18,000 in cash to pay for a music video. In Albuquerque, DEA agents boarded the train and started asking people questions. They got to Rivers, who told him he was going to shoot a music video and agreed to let them search his stuff. That, as police abuse observers know full well, was going to be a mistake. Joline Guiterrez Krueger of the Albuquerque Journal was alerted to what happened by a contact who also happened to be on the train and ended up helping Rivers when he was left with nothing:

Rivers was the only passenger singled out for a search by DEA agents – and the only black person on his portion of the train, [attorney Michael] Pancer said.

In one of the bags, the agent found the cash, still in the Michigan bank envelope.

"I even allowed him to call my mother, a military veteran and (hospital) coordinator, to corroborate my story," Rivers said. "Even with all of this, the officers decided to take my money because he stated that he believed that the money was involved in some type of narcotic activity."

Rivers was left penniless, his dream deferred.

"These officers took everything that I had worked so hard to save and even money that was given to me by family that believed in me," Rivers said in his email. "I told (the DEA agents) I had no money and no means to survive in Los Angeles if they took my money. They informed me that it was my responsibility to figure out how I was going to do that."

Other travelers had witnessed what happened. One of them, a New Mexico man I've written about before but who asked that I not mention his name, provided a way for Rivers to get home, contacted attorneys – and me.

What does the DEA in Albuquerque have to say about it? They wouldn't say much but insisted Rivers hadn't been racially profiled:

Waite said that in general DEA agents look for "indicators" such as whether the person bought an expensive one-way ticket with cash, if the person is traveling from or to a city known as a hot spot for drug activity, if the person's story has inconsistencies or if the large sums of money found could have been transported by more conventional means.


NOTE - This is what cops actually believe -

Quote:

"We don't have to prove that the person is guilty," Waite said. "It's that the money is presumed to be guilty."

Those are the now-heavily-publicized rules for civil, not criminal, asset forfeiture. The money is the defendant, regular criminal due process does not apply, and Rivers will face a huge battle trying to get it back, assuming this burst of publicity doesn't help at all. A GoFundMe page has been set up to try to replace Rivers' money.


Fucking pig fucks. I hope they all get raped by the Nation of Islam.
post #1901 of 6095
How does money have the mens rea to commit a crime? Can't you just use the affirmative defense of: "Cash Monies, the defendent, lacked the mental capacity to know what it was doing is wrong"?
post #1902 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

How does money have the mens rea to commit a crime? Can't you just use the affirmative defense of: "Cash Monies, the defendent, lacked the mental capacity to know what it was doing is wrong"?

Its a fiction developed by law enforcement and our elected officials, and enforced by the courts, as a way to steal property without having to go to jail.
post #1903 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

How does money have the mens rea to commit a crime? Can't you just use the affirmative defense of: "Cash Monies, the defendent, lacked the mental capacity to know what it was doing is wrong"?


Cash Rules Everything Around me, C.R.E.A.M., get the money, dolla dolla bill, ya'll!

post #1904 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post

Real Qualudes don't exist anymore. Except for the 10, 000 Rorer 714s I put in a safe deposit box in 1977.
Careful . The come on is real slow
post #1905 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post

Real Qualudes don't exist anymore. Except for the 10, 000 Rorer 714s I put in a safe deposit box in 1977.

I believe they're still manufactured in South Africa.
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