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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 120

post #1786 of 6073
The best rule of thumb is to avoid interactions with cops whenever and whereever possible. Even if you have to eat crow. "Hello, sir!"

That way, you don't get a ticket, you don't get shot, and you don't end up carrying around the electronic scarlet letter "A" for the rest of your life (arrest). Once you've been marked with "A", there is no question in their minds, when they pull you up on the computer, that you are an easy target.
post #1787 of 6073
Best rule of thumb is don't be black. Avoid interaction is rule #2.
post #1788 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

The best rule of thumb is to avoid interactions with cops whenever and whereever possible. Even if you have to eat crow. "Hello, sir!"

That way, you don't get a ticket, you don't get shot, and you don't end up carrying around the electronic scarlet letter "A" for the rest of your life (arrest). Once you've been marked with "A", there is no question in their minds, when they pull you up on the computer, that you are an easy target.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/08/15/the-day-ferguson-cops-were-caught-in-a-bloody-lie.html

Then you have the times when citizens are perfectly law abiding and still get arrested and the shit kicked out of them.

See Texasmade's rule 1.
post #1789 of 6073
The problem is it's not up to the civilian in determining avoidance of police. It's not like they need to find you speeding or driving erratically to pull you over; we all know they make shit up. One of the places I hang at the staff and regulars know you do not turn right out of the parking lot, as at the stop sign at the end of the block, police sit in a little pull out and pull people over with claims of rolling the stop sign. You could come to a full stop and sit there for 20 seconds, and if they think you might be an easy mark, you get pulled over for rolling that stop sign.

So now the cop has you pulled over for dubious cause. He wants to search you car. You respectfully ask him why, tell him you would rather not, and that you would like to go. Again, we all know the shit some cops will pull in this situation. We also all know that me, respectable looking middle aged white guy in his shiny new MB, is probably going to be released and not searched whereas a grubbing looking person, in a shitty car, probably is going to see his interaction amped up by the cops. Make them a male minority 18-30 and you know a respectful expression of refusing a search for no reason will not end well.
post #1790 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nil View Post

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/08/15/the-day-ferguson-cops-were-caught-in-a-bloody-lie.html

Then you have the times when citizens are perfectly law abiding and still get arrested and the shit kicked out of them.

See Texasmade's rule 1.

I'm white and, as I recounted earlier in this thread, one night at 4am I was eating a snack on the couch and the next thing I know I'm handcuffed at gun point in my driveway and cops are searching my house. Being white doesn't always get you a pass. I've also had police threaten me with jail time unless I admitted to something I didn't do, and have witnessed them completely fabricate things (both of these were underage consumption of alcohol incidents back in the day, but still). I'm not purporting that this is comparable to being black in certain cities, but to couch this as a black issue doesn't make much sense, at least not if you want something to be done about it.
post #1791 of 6073
Who's the victim here?

I'm concerned about "speaking while conservative."

This atrocity is happening in Nil's home state.

(For the TLDNR crowd: DA and SWAT going after people for thoughtcrime.)

Quote:
Wisconsin’s Shame: ‘I Thought It Was a Home Invasion’
From the May 4, 2015, issue of NR
By David French — April 20, 2015


‘They came with a battering ram.”

Cindy Archer, one of the lead architects of Wisconsin’s Act 10 — also called the “Wisconsin Budget Repair Bill,” it limited public-employee benefits and altered collective-bargaining rules for public-employee unions — was jolted awake by yelling, loud pounding at the door, and her dogs’ frantic barking. The entire house — the windows and walls — was shaking.

She looked outside to see up to a dozen police officers, yelling to open the door. They were carrying a battering ram.

RELATED: Politicized Prosecution Run Amok in Wisconsin

She wasn’t dressed, but she started to run toward the door, her body in full view of the police. Some yelled at her to grab some clothes, others yelled for her to open the door.

“I was so afraid,” she says. “I did not know what to do.” She grabbed some clothes, opened the door, and dressed right in front of the police. The dogs were still frantic.

“I begged and begged, ‘Please don’t shoot my dogs, please don’t shoot my dogs, just don’t shoot my dogs.’ I couldn’t get them to stop barking, and I couldn’t get them outside quick enough. I saw a gun and barking dogs. I was scared and knew this was a bad mix.”

She got the dogs safely out of the house, just as multiple armed agents rushed inside. Some even barged into the bathroom, where her partner was in the shower. The officer or agent in charge demanded that Cindy sit on the couch, but she wanted to get up and get a cup of coffee.

“I told him this was my house and I could do what I wanted.” Wrong thing to say. “This made the agent in charge furious. He towered over me with his finger in my face and yelled like a drill sergeant that I either do it his way or he would handcuff me.”

They wouldn’t let her speak to a lawyer. She looked outside and saw a person who appeared to be a reporter. Someone had tipped him off.

The neighbors started to come outside, curious at the commotion, and all the while the police searched her house, making a mess, and — according to Cindy — leaving her “dead mother’s belongings strewn across the basement floor in a most disrespectful way.”

Then they left, carrying with them only a cellphone and a laptop.

“It’s a matter of life or death.”

That was the first thought of “Anne” (not her real name). Someone was pounding at her front door. It was early in the morning — very early — and it was the kind of heavy pounding that meant someone was either fleeing from — or bringing — trouble.

“It was so hard. I’d never heard anything like it. I thought someone was dying outside.”

She ran to the door, opened it, and then chaos. “People came pouring in. For a second I thought it was a home invasion. It was terrifying. They were yelling and running, into every room in the house. One of the men was in my face, yelling at me over and over and over.”

It was indeed a home invasion, but the people who were pouring in were Wisconsin law-enforcement officers. Armed, uniformed police swarmed into the house. Plainclothes investigators cornered her and her newly awakened family. Soon, state officials were seizing the family’s personal property, including each person’s computer and smartphone, filled with the most intimate family information.

Why were the police at Anne’s home? She had no answers. The police were treating them the way they’d seen police treat drug dealers on television.

In fact, TV or movies were their only points of reference, because they weren’t criminals. They were law-abiding. They didn’t buy or sell drugs. They weren’t violent. They weren’t a danger to anyone. Yet there were cops — surrounding their house on the outside, swarming the house on the inside. They even taunted the family as if they were mere “perps.”


As if the home invasion, the appropriation of private property, and the verbal abuse weren’t enough, next came ominous warnings.

Don’t call your lawyer.

Don’t tell anyone about this raid. Not even your mother, your father, or your closest friends.

The entire neighborhood could see the police around their house, but they had to remain silent. This was not the “right to remain silent” as uttered by every cop on every legal drama on television — the right against self-incrimination. They couldn’t mount a public defense if they wanted — or even offer an explanation to family and friends.

Yet no one in this family was a “perp.” Instead, like Cindy, they were American citizens guilty of nothing more than exercising their First Amendment rights to support Act 10 and other conservative causes in Wisconsin. Sitting there shocked and terrified, this citizen — who is still too intimidated to speak on the record — kept thinking, “Is this America?”

“They followed me to my kids’ rooms.”

For the family of “Rachel” (not her real name), the ordeal began before dawn — with the same loud, insistent knocking. Still in her pajamas, Rachel answered the door and saw uniformed police, poised to enter her home.

When Rachel asked to wake her children herself, the officer insisted on walking into their rooms. The kids woke to an armed officer, standing near their beds.

The entire family was herded into one room, and there they watched as the police carried off their personal possessions, including items that had nothing to do with the subject of the search warrant — even her daughter’s computer.

And, yes, there were the warnings. Don’t call your lawyer. Don’t talk to anyone about this. Don’t tell your friends. The kids watched — alarmed — as the school bus drove by, with the students inside watching the spectacle of uniformed police surrounding the house, carrying out the family’s belongings. Yet they were told they couldn’t tell anyone at school.

They, too, had to remain silent.

The mom watched as her entire life was laid open before the police. Her professional files, her personal files, everything. She knew this was all politics. She knew a rogue prosecutor was targeting her for her political beliefs.

And she realized, “Every aspect of my life is in their hands. And they hate me.”

Fortunately for her family, the police didn’t taunt her or her children. Some of them seemed embarrassed by what they were doing. At the end of the ordeal, one officer looked at the family, still confined to one room, and said, “Some days, I hate my job.”

For dozens of conservatives, the years since Scott Walker’s first election as governor of Wisconsin transformed the state — known for pro-football championships, good cheese, and a population with a reputation for being unfailingly polite — into a place where conservatives have faced early-morning raids, multi-year secretive criminal investigations, slanderous and selective leaks to sympathetic media, and intrusive electronic snooping.

Yes, Wisconsin, the cradle of the progressive movement and home of the “Wisconsin idea” — the marriage of state governments and state universities to govern through technocratic reform — was giving birth to a new progressive idea, the use of law enforcement as a political instrument, as a weapon to attempt to undo election results, shame opponents, and ruin lives.


http://www.nationalreview.com/article/417155/wisconsins-shame-i-thought-it-was-home-invasion-david-french
post #1792 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post

I am well aware of the presumption of innocence. I was talking in a practical sense. When someone is being arrested, it is not the time to protest innocence and resist the arrest ( though they well may be innocent ). Better to be alive and arrested than a dead martyr. Tamir Rice, sadly, is a martyr of sorts.Many like Mike Brown were criminals not martyrs.

As much as it is distasteful to think that innocent people are arrested all the time. It is also distasteful to think that a great many police violence cases would not have happened if there was no resistance at the time of the arrest.

Sure, there are endemic problems with our Justice system, and there are many injustices perpetrated. But as a rule, it is not wise to resist arrest.

I don't disagree, but there are many cases where citizens did comply and the cop killed him/her anyway. Yes, your chances of surviving increase if you comply. But as Gibonus said, we shouldn't live in that kind of police state.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

The best rule of thumb is to avoid interactions with cops whenever and whereever possible.

Agreed, 100%. That's why I don't get why people ever call the police, I guess except in cases where insurance requires a report for theft or damage. There's no situation so fucked that can't be made worse by the presence of the police.
post #1793 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasmade View Post

Best rule of thumb is don't be black. Avoid interaction is rule #2.
Sweet, I nailed rule #1!!!
post #1794 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

I'm white and, as I recounted earlier in this thread, one night at 4am I was eating a snack on the couch and the next thing I know I'm handcuffed at gun point in my driveway and cops are searching my house. Being white doesn't always get you a pass. I've also had police threaten me with jail time unless I admitted to something I didn't do, and have witnessed them completely fabricate things (both of these were underage consumption of alcohol incidents back in the day, but still). I'm not purporting that this is comparable to being black in certain cities, but to couch this as a black issue doesn't make much sense, at least not if you want something to be done about it.

If you were black you would've been shot because the police would've assumed the TV control in your hand was a gun. Being white kept you alive.
post #1795 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasmade View Post

If you were black you would've been shot because the police would've assumed the TV control in your hand was a gun. Being white kept you alive.

They didn't need to assume anything because I had an actual gun in my hand. I think you missed the story when I posted it.

I think you're moving the goalposts a bit. "Yeah, okay, you are white and the police still harassed you, but you would have been harassed even more if you were black."
post #1796 of 6073
Woman videoing police and huge cop walks up, grabs her phone, and breaks it.

http://gawker.com/video-appears-to-show-u-s-marshal-destroying-an-onlook-1699298257
post #1797 of 6073
This is less police and more federal government, but it is scarey stuff none the less.

A taste:
Quote:
In a keynote speech at the RSA conference, Johnson cautioned the computer industry against widening the use of strong encryption. He likened the situation to a world in which the telephone had been introduced without an accompanying mechanism for law enforcement and intelligence agencies to tap phone calls. “Our inability to access encrypted information poses public safety challenges,” he said. “Encryption is making it harder for your government to find criminal activity.”

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/536951/white-house-and-department-of-homeland-security-want-a-way-around-encryption/
post #1798 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

This is less police and more federal government, but it is scarey stuff none the less.

A taste:
http://www.technologyreview.com/news/536951/white-house-and-department-of-homeland-security-want-a-way-around-encryption/

LOLZ. That is genius level evil shit.
post #1799 of 6073
post #1800 of 6073
Quote:
Originally Posted by anginaprinzmetal View Post

holy shit… the cop run him over with his car…

http://www.cnn.com/videos/justice/2015/04/22/dnt-az-officer-runs-into-suspect-with-car.kvoa

But the pig got home safe at the end of his shift. That's all that matters.
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