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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 2

post #16 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Those things are dangerous. The plaintiff in this reported decision had to get her hip replaced after being attacked by one: http://courts.ms.gov/Images/Opinions/CO69210.pdf

laugh.gif

I would like to see a video of that
post #17 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Those things are dangerous. The plaintiff in this reported decision had to get her hip replaced after being attacked by one: http://courts.ms.gov/Images/Opinions/CO69210.pdf

What? The dog never even touched her.
post #18 of 6090
I guess this is the closest we have to a "Cops hate dogs" thread so here goes -

http://www.wlox.com/story/22157773/hundreds-r
Quote:
PERRY COUNTY, MS (WDAM) -
The accidental death of the Perry County K-9 dog who died after being locked in his handler's patrol car overnight has many people calling for his job.

About three weeks ago, Napo, a 3-year-old Belgian Malinois, was found dead in the patrol car. His handler, Steve Verret, had apparently forgot the dog was in the vehicle.

Reaction from around the state from animal advocates and others has been one of shock and anger.

Cops even hate their own dogs. Disgusting pigs.
post #19 of 6090
So why isn't the cop in jail pending a death of a cop trial? I mean if any of us would have been responsible for the dog dying like this we would be looking at a murder charge and a death sentence. Gotta love double standards.
post #20 of 6090
http://www.bakersfieldcalifornian.com/local/x568091070/Dad-who-died-during-arrest-begged-for-his-life-cops-take-witness-video
Quote:
Dad who died during arrest 'begged for his life'; witness videos seized
BY LAURA LIERA AND JASON KOTOWSKI Californian staff writers lliera@bakersfield.com; jkotowski@bakersfield.com

Blood stains are still visible on the sidewalk at the corner of Flower Street and Palm Drive, where a Bakersfield man struggled with as many as nine officers and later died this week.

David Sal Silva, 33 and the father of four young children, died early Wednesday morning after deputies say he fought with them and CHP officers who'd responded to a report of a possibly intoxicated man outside Kern Medical Center.

Ruben Ceballos, 19, who lives a few houses from where David Silva and the KCSD had an encounter resulting in the death of Silva early Wednesday morning, said he was a witness to the incident.

The Kern County Sheriff's Office says Silva resisted, a canine was deployed, more law enforcement arrived, batons were used and the man later had trouble breathing. He was taken to KMC, where he died. An autopsy was slated for Thursday, but no results have been released.

Some witnesses apparently took cellphone video of the incident but deputies moved quickly to seize the phones. The Sheriff's Office, after releasing a statement Wednesday and naming its officers Thursday, declined all further comment.

People who say they witnessed the incident as well as Silva's family members described a scene in which deputies essentially were beating a helpless man to death. They were indignant that cellphone video had been taken away by deputies.

"My brother spent the last eight minutes of his life pleading, begging for his life," said Christopher Silva, 31, brother of the dead man. He said he's talked to witnesses but did not see the incident himself.

At about midnight, Ruben Ceballos, 19,was awakened by screams and loud banging noises outside his home. He said he ran to the left side of his house to find out who was causing the ruckus.

"When I got outside I saw two officers beating a man with batons and they were hitting his head so every time they would swing, I could hear the blows to his head," Ceballos said.

Silva was on the ground screaming for help, but officers continued to beat him, Ceballos said.

After several minutes, Ceballos said, Silva stopped screaming and was no longer responsive.

"His body was just lying on the street and before the ambulance arrived one of the officers performed CPR on him and another one used a flashlight on his eyes but I'm sure he was already dead," Ceballos said.


Other relatives demanded to know more.

David Silva's mother, Merri Silva, 54, said, "If I don't do anything about my son's death then it will just be pushed to the side and I don't want this to happen to another person."

Sheriff's spokesman Ray Pruitt said a KMC security officer called deputies at about 11:55 p.m. Tuesday to report that there was a man in the area who was possibly intoxicated. A deputy with a canine found Silva at the southeast corner of the intersection and contacted him. It was then that Silva resisted and fought the deputy while the deputy tried to take him into custody, Pruitt said. More deputies and two California High Patrol officers arrived to help, Pruitt said.

Asked to respond to the family and witness allegations, Pruitt said no one from the Sheriff's Office will comment or release information regarding the case until the investigation is over.

The office did identify the officers involved in the arrest as Sgt. Douglas Sword and deputies Ryan Greer, Tanner Miller, Jeffrey Kelly, Luis Almanza, Brian Brock and David Stephens.

The CHP hasn't released the names of its officers at the scene.

On Thursday afternoon, Christopher Silva said the family had not yet been able to see his brother's body, but had learned about different witnesses who had taken video footage of the incident.

"The true evidence is in those phones witnesses have that apparently the sheriff deputies already took," Silva said. "But I know the truth will come out and my brother's voice will be heard."

John Tello, a criminal law attorney, is representing two witnesses who took video footage and five other witnesses to the incident. He said his clients are still shaken by what they saw.

"When I arrived to the home of one of the witnesses that had video footage, she was with her family sitting down on the couch, surrounded by three deputies," Tello said.

Tello said the witness was not allowed to go anywhere with her phone and was being quarantined inside her home.

When Tello tried to talk to the witness in private and with the phone, one of the deputies stopped him and told him he couldn't take the phone anywhere because it was evidence to the investigation, the attorney said.

"This was not a crime scene where the evidence was going to be destroyed," Tello said. "These were concerned citizens who were basically doing a civic duty of preserving the evidence, not destroying it as they (sheriff deputies) tried to make it seem."

A search warrant wasn't presented to either of the witnesses until after Tello arrived, he said, adding that one phone was seized before the warrant was produced.

Tello said the phone of the first witness was taken after the deputies told him he was either going to give up the phone the easy way or the hard way.

"They basically told him they were either going to keep him at this house all night until they could find a judge to sign a search warrant or he could just turn over his phone," he said.


The witness gave up his phone two hours before he had to get to work and was told by deputies that he could collect his phone the next day after they had extracted the evidence they needed, Tello said.

However, the witness never got his phone back, Tello said, and was told it could take years before he does because the investigation could take a long time.

"My main concern is that these witnesses are not harassed by deputies because this case can make others who see crimes happening not want to speak up because of the way law enforcement handles situations," Tello said.

Local defense attorney Kyle J. Humphrey said, generally speaking, he believes law enforcement can seize cellphones or cameras at the scene under the theory that they've captured evidence of a crime. Because of the digital nature of the evidence, they could argue that it's urgent they immediately take the cameras.

"It's one of those murky areas that's come about by the existence of modern technology," said Humphrey, who is not involved in this case.

He said he thinks law enforcement officers would first ask for the person to voluntarily hand over the evidence, but they could just seize it and hold it until they get a court order to search it.

Silva left behind four children, ranging from ages 2 to 10 years old. As of Thursday afternoon, his mother said, they hadn't figured out how to tell the children their father is dead. Merri Silva remembers her son as a happy person who loved his kids.

"We're all hurt and it's not something that I can comprehend and in part (it's) because I feel that it still hasn't hit me that he is gone," the mother said.
post #21 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by cross22 View Post

Ok, I have started to hate cops because of this thread. I hope you assholes are happy.

If you aren't pissed enough, check this out:


http://photographyisnotacrime.com/
post #22 of 6090
I watched the surveillance video of cops beating a homeless man to death a few miles from where I live. Yeah the guy wasn't answering their questions right away, but was in no way a threat. Tasers were used and cops were holding him down as another cop was beating his face in as the man was crying out for his dad to help him. It was absolutely sickening to watch and they killed him in the process. Before they did this, the man was sitting down and a cop put on latex gloves and said, "Now see my fists? They are getting ready to fuck you up!" Then the beating began. If you have the stomach for it, the homeless man was named Kelly Thomas.

From Wikipedia:

The incident
Kelly Thomas, after a fatal beating by officers of the Fullerton, California Police Department

On July 5, 2011, at about 8:30 PM, officers of the Fullerton Police Department responded to a call from the management of the Slidebar[16] that someone was vandalizing cars near the Fullerton Transportation Center. While investigating, they encountered the shirtless and disheveled Thomas and attempted to search him. According to statements given by the officers, Thomas was uncooperative and resisted when they attempted to search him, so backup was called. The officers then repeatedly applied Tasers to Thomas, hit him with the butts of the Tasers and flashlights, and threw him onto the ground.[17] A video of the event surfaced, and Thomas can be heard repeatedly screaming in pain while officers are heard repeatedly asking him to place his arms behind his back. Unable to get Kelly to comply with the requests, the officers used a taser on him (up to five times according to a witness statement), and in the video Thomas can be heard screaming "Dad! Dad!".[18] Six officers were involved in subduing Thomas, who was unarmed and had a history of mental illness. Thomas was initially taken to St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton but was transferred immediately to the UC Irvine Medical Center with severe injuries to his head, face, and neck.[19]

Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas gave a detailed account of the events during a press conference on September 21, 2011. Using digital audio recording devices carried by the officers, surveillance video from a pole camera at the Fullerton Transportation Center, and other evidence, Rackauckas provided evidence that Thomas did comply with orders from Officer Ramos, who had put on latex gloves and asked Thomas "Now see my fists? They are getting ready to fuck you up."[20] Rackauckas went on to describe how Thomas begged for his life, before being beaten to death.[21]

Aftermath

The story of his beating broke shortly before his death.[22][23] An investigation into the beating was undertaken by the Orange County district attorney starting on July 7, 2011,[24] and later the FBI became involved.[25] The decision to involve the FBI was praised by the American Civil Liberties Union, which claims the Orange County District Attorney has an "abysmal" record when investigating shootings with police involvement.[24]

Kelly Thomas was removed from life support and died on July 10, 2011, five days after the beating.[26] Initial reports claimed that Thomas had been very combative with officers and two had suffered broken bones.[27] Later, the police department confirmed that no officers had suffered any broken bones, and that no one other than Thomas had any significant injuries.[28] By the end of July, several news outlets had picked up the story and it had become international news.[29]

On July 18, 2011, a large protest outside the Fullerton Police Department was organized by several people, including the victim's father Ron Thomas.[30]
Ron Thomas speaks to the Fullerton City Council and the media.

On August 2, 2011 many members of the public spoke out about the beating at the biweekly city council meeting at the Fullerton City Hall.[31] Over 70 members of the public spoke to the city council, the vast majority of whom criticized the police. Among the speakers was Ron Thomas, the father of Kelly Thomas, as well as Kelly Thomas's stepmother. The public comment session lasted for approximately three hours. The city attorney emphasized that the city council could not respond to the comments, however following the public comment period discussion was given to provide clarification on the city's policy regarding the mentally ill. In addition, Tony Bushala, a local developer and conservative activist, announced plans to recall three members of the city council thought to have responded insufficiently to the beating.[32] The recall qualified on the ballot in February 2012[33] with a recall election scheduled for Don Bankhead, F. Dick Jones, and Pat McKinley on June 5, 2012, consolidated with the statewide primary election.[34] On June 5, 2012 all three council members were successfully recalled by Fullerton residents.[35]

On Saturday August 6, 2011, a large street protest was held outside of the Fullerton City Hall. Activists at that protest, which was attended by hundreds of people, called for the release of a surveillance video shot by cameras installed at the bus depot and carried signs with slogans like "Jail All Killer Cops" and "End Police Brutality."[36]

In late September 2011, the officers involved were arrested on murder charges. Local law enforcement personnel showed support by raising money for their bail and criminal defense.[37]

Thirty days after the incident all six officers involved in the beating were placed on administrative leave and several people, including two members of the Fullerton City Council, called for the resignation of police Chief Michael Sellers,[38] who was later placed on medical leave in August 2011 for undisclosed reasons.[39] Sellers continued his medical leave for 7 months and resigned on February 18, 2012 having never returned to work.[40] 19,948 people have signed an online petition calling for the firing of all six police officers that were present during the beating.[41][42]

Fullerton City Councilman Bruce Whitaker later went on television stating his belief that there was a cover-up of the beating of Thomas within the police department and that the six officers involved in the beating falsified their reports on the incident.[43]

A preliminary hearing to determine if there is sufficient evidence for a trial was held on May 9, 2012. The court ordered that two of the police officers involved will stand trial. Officer Manuel Ramos is charged with second-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter, and Corporal Jay Patrick Cicinelli is charged with involuntary manslaughter and felony use of excessive force. Both officers pleaded not guilty at the second arraignment on July 13, 2012.[44] Attempts by the defendants to dismiss the charges have been denied.[9][10] Trials for Cicinelli and Ramos are scheduled to begin June 28, 2013.[10] In September 2012, Officer Joseph Wolfe was indicted on charges of involuntary manslaughter and use of excessive force.[45] Wolfe is scheduled for a pre-trial conference on March 29, 2013.[10]

On 16 May 2012, press reports indicated that the Fullerton City Council had agreed to pay Thomas' mother one million dollars as a settlement of her civil complaints against the city. This did not impact the ongoing civil actions by Thomas' father or the criminal trial.[46]
post #23 of 6090
I'm always a little surprised when officers responsible for murdering someone aren't given medals for their "heroic actions".
post #24 of 6090
why not cooperate? that part I don't get
post #25 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post

why not cooperate? that part I don't get

Cooperate with what? Getting beaten to death? How exactly do you cooperate with a pig cop who is beating you to death?
post #26 of 6090
If I werent already radicalized against police, this thread would probably get me there.
post #27 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Cooperate with what? Getting beaten to death? How exactly do you cooperate with a pig cop who is beating you to death?
the problem is, we never have videos of the beginnings of these things. I honestly find it hard to believe that a group of cops approach a law abiding citizen and, without warning, start wailing on him. so, if they come up to him and ask him a question and he tries to run, or mouths off, or swings, sure, violence might happen. and that sucks and it isn't excusable. a cop asks me a question, I answer him/her politely, it isn't that painful.
post #28 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post

the problem is, we never have videos of the beginnings of these things. I honestly find it hard to believe that a group of cops approach a law abiding citizen and, without warning, start wailing on him. so, if they come up to him and ask him a question and he tries to run, or mouths off, or swings, sure, violence might happen. and that sucks and it isn't excusable. a cop asks me a question, I answer him/her politely, it isn't that painful.
You're also not a mentally ill, homeless man. Regardless of any sort of early provocation, how is mouthing off to a cop a capitol offense?

You're also not a mentally ill, homeless man. I find it entirely believable that a group of police, in the face of lack of respect to their authority (cue Cartman pic), will start wailing on a person. But regardless of any sort of early provocation, how is mouthing off to a cop a capitol offense?
post #29 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post

the problem is, we never have videos of the beginnings of these things. I honestly find it hard to believe that a group of cops approach a law abiding citizen and, without warning, start wailing on him. so, if they come up to him and ask him a question and he tries to run, or mouths off, or swings, sure, violence might happen. and that sucks and it isn't excusable.

It doesn't matter how it started. Once the guy's on the ground it's not acceptable to keep beating him.

Quote:
a cop asks me a question, I answer him/her politely, it isn't that painful.

NEVER answer a cop's question. You're under no legal obligation to do so and nothing you say can possibly help you.
post #30 of 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

It doesn't matter how it started. Once the guy's on the ground it's not acceptable to keep beating him.

once the guy stops fighting back, its not acceptable to keep beating him, agreed

NEVER answer a cop's question. You're under no legal obligation to do so and nothing you say can possibly help you.[/quote]

you are probably correct.
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