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post #76 of 82

So I was going to order some Saphir but I'm thinking I'm going to get Glen's polish instead. With the water resistant line out, is there a benefit or reason to getting the regular polish instead of the water resistant one?

Glen, do you also sell brushes and such? I'm just starting my shoe care box, so need some brushes and such too; if not, do you have any specific ones you recommend or is there something to look for (horse hair vs goat hair, etc.) when looking for some?

Black is easy, but I'm not sure what brown to get; dark or regular. Here is a picture of my brown shoes next to my black ones for comparison. It's dark, so it's just indoor lighting (won't be able to get outdoor lighting pics until this weekend at the soonest if that is needed :( )

 

Without flash:

 

With flash:

post #77 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EuroTrip View Post

So I was going to order some Saphir but I'm thinking I'm going to get Glen's polish instead. With the water resistant line out, is there a benefit or reason to getting the regular polish instead of the water resistant one?
Glen, do you also sell brushes and such? I'm just starting my shoe care box, so need some brushes and such too; if not, do you have any specific ones you recommend or is there something to look for (horse hair vs goat hair, etc.) when looking for some?
Black is easy, but I'm not sure what brown to get; dark or regular. Here is a picture of my brown shoes next to my black ones for comparison. It's dark, so it's just indoor lighting (won't be able to get outdoor lighting pics until this weekend at the soonest if that is needed frown.gif )

I would use Walnut for the brown shoes in your picture.

The water resistant polish has a slightly grainy feel to it, which some people don't care for, but it does smooth out on the shoe. I still use the regular line unless I need to add some additional water resistance to a pair of shoes or boots.

I have considered selling brushes, but do not currently. Almost any standard horse hair brush will do, and they typically cost less than $10 at most department stores or online.
post #78 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post


I would use Walnut for the brown shoes in your picture.

The water resistant polish has a slightly grainy feel to it, which some people don't care for, but it does smooth out on the shoe. I still use the regular line unless I need to add some additional water resistance to a pair of shoes or boots.

I have considered selling brushes, but do not currently. Almost any standard horse hair brush will do, and they typically cost less than $10 at most department stores or online.

Glen, if you were gonna sell brushes, what kind of hair do you have in mind besides horsehair? 

post #79 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Glen, if you were gonna sell brushes, what kind of hair do you have in mind besides horsehair? 

I would probably just stick with the standard horsehair brush that has a 6" wooden handle the length of the brush. That works for about 90% of what you would need a brush for.

The length of the bristles is what makes the most difference. A 8" brush will usually have longer bristles (it's a ratio/scale thing) and therefore be softer. For a stiffer brush just take a pair of scissors to a standard 6' brush and cut off a 1/3 of the length of the bristles. This makes for a great cleaning brush. Another great cleaning brush is a boar's hair brush, but I think either is a little too stiff for polishing.

As a side note: shoe brushes should be cleaned after about ever 10 to 20 uses, just to remove any collected wax and pigment. Use dish soap to clean the brush but try to keep the wooden handle from getting too wet. If the wooden handle gets too wet the wood will swell slightly and when it dries the bristles will not be bound as well in the handle and you will begin to lose more bristles when polishing.

So that would be the long answer.
post #80 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post


I would probably just stick with the standard horsehair brush that has a 6" wooden handle the length of the brush. That works for about 90% of what you would need a brush for.

The length of the bristles is what makes the most difference. A 8" brush will usually have longer bristles (it's a ratio/scale thing) and therefore be softer. For a stiffer brush just take a pair of scissors to a standard 6' brush and cut off a 1/3 of the length of the bristles. This makes for a great cleaning brush. Another great cleaning brush is a boar's hair brush, but I think either is a little too stiff for polishing.

As a side note: shoe brushes should be cleaned after about ever 10 to 20 uses, just to remove any collected wax and pigment. Use dish soap to clean the brush but try to keep the wooden handle from getting too wet. If the wooden handle gets too wet the wood will swell slightly and when it dries the bristles will not be bound as well in the handle and you will begin to lose more bristles when polishing.

So that would be the long answer.

Time for my craziness here - I even used hair conditioner on my brushes!!! LOL!!!

 

My hands are only comfortable with 8 inches brushes. I don't feel any good, or have as good a grip, with anything smaller.

 

Boar bristle brushes should only be preserved for grainy leather and the sole, shouldn't they?

post #81 of 82
I'm running low on my GlenKaren cleaner and conditioner, and just found out about the water resistant line. Very interesting. Will place an order once I'm officially out.

A big kudos to Glen for continuing to innovate.
post #82 of 82

You'll love the waterproofing line. It's excellent. 

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