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We're all here because we love talking about clothes. - Page 2

post #16 of 31
In terms of fashion/style/clothing, Atlanta is a frozen shithole. Atlanta is a dogshit dildo. Atlanta is fucking over.

My interest in clothing first started with stuff around me, which means that I was really into super slim plaids and oxfords and sort-of-not-really preppy workwear stuff. That's just how southerners who "know how to dress" dress, sort of like a weird try-hard bastardization of Ivy type thing. I just wanted to look good, and the only exposure I have to clothing is either that or on the internet. Combine my surroundings with 2008-2009 Styleforum... man, I remember how down I was with plaid, having like 10-15 shirts and clarks desert boots and alden indy's and "fun" socks...

But really that stuff wasn't me. It was never really that comfortable for me, both taste-wise and functionally. I'm in ecology and do a lot of hiking and birding, and I love being outside; tight crisp oxfords and stuff really looks out of place there when others who share the same interest are wearing Chacos and cargo shorts and rocking ponytails or whatever. The ultimate inspiration for me isn't what's done by fashionable people per se, but really I've grown to love how my colleagues dress. Comfort, loose, throw in a bit of utility, something you can wear in the sun and be happy and not miserable.

When I started working in the gardens a few years ago, I saw so many ridiculous outfits. Everything was so eclectic because you had people from all sorts of different cultures coming to one place to volunteer and work. You had African influences with a lot of their traditional wear, Muslims and Middle Eastern wear, "hippie" white girl stuff with sun hats and oversized cardigans, cargo pants and old, 10 year old chambray shirts, florals so vibrant and awesome that they pretty much blend into the garden themselves...

That's a lot of how I dress now, with about 40% of my wardrobe being more minimal and "cleaner" stuff like Schneider, etc. I used to not think too much about utility, but now it's almost essential to me. Of course, I do it my own way by spending waaaaay more money than they do to look much, much worse than them, and I feel kind of bad for it so I don't talk to anyone about clothing or fashion because ... what's there to talk about? I'd much rather talk about which varieties of tomatoes will do the best this season or share some recipes for awesome pepper pulled pork.

That said, man, c4 is a real inspiration though...it's not just what he wears that I love, but it's how he wears it. It's like, I see the dude and read his posts and I can't imagine him dressing any other way. That's what I really feel this whole fashion thing boils down for me, and although I can talk to people about Raf, Jil, Margiela, all that shit I've learned from the great people here, I think it's equally as nice to just look decent and be comfortable, be you, and drink some sweet tea and eat some fried chicken on a porch.
post #17 of 31
The best thing about having an interest in fashion is when you buy gifts for people close to you who aren't interested in fashion. You know exactly their style, but you're exposed to so much more than they are.
post #18 of 31
My interest started when I was a kid, but back then it wasn't an interest so much as recognition of clothing as a code. I had two older sisters: one was popular, preppy, hung out with the football players; the other was a metalhead and hung out with all the stoner/skater/metalhead kids. From them and their friends I started to understand that clothes and the way you looked signaled which tribe you belonged to. My preppy sister was a bitch and I hated her friends, but I would stay up late playing video games with my metalhead sister and her friends (I didn't know at the time that they were all stoned out of their minds). So I started to develop an affinity for that tribe.

As I'm growing up it's always evident that social groups identify themselves by their appearance. Clothes signal those all-important identifiers like who your friends are and what music you listen to. I have to start dressing for my tribe. Only my tribe isn't clear. I have friends in different social groups and don't hang out with one core group yet. There's no uniform to adopt, so I have to come up with my own. I think that's where my interest really started. Needless to say, there were lots of really bad looks. I even wore jncos for a while, but not like a raver kid (we didn't have a rave scene that I can remember so I didn't even know those were part of that tribe's uniform). I wore them because they looked so different from anything else the other kids wore and that appealed to me. Those came and went I tried other looks, but that idea of the preppy kids as assholes and the metalheads taking me in never really left me. It expressed itself in the form of me disliking one style and inclining toward another. It's probably not a coincidence that I listened to almost nothing but punk rock for most of high school. Eventually my friends and I did coalesce into a core group, but we didn't look like any one thing. I think in a way that's how we ended up friends: we didn't belong to other tribes so we made our own.

Today I still to some degree look at clothes as a signal of a person's tribe, and still don't identify with any one. I'm not a goth ninja or a Japanese street style obsessive or an artisanal fetishist or a #menswear guy. I like little bits of everything, whatever I happen to think is well-designed and well-made and—most importantly—fits me, both physically of course and in terms of what it projects. That's where my interest is now. And even after all these years I still tend to prefer darker clothing. That's the power of some friendly stoner kids and probably a whole lot of weed.
post #19 of 31
Parker mentioned this already, but the only physical location I can think of where I've experienced open discussion about 'style' is at skate shops. And not just in an 'I like that/I don't like that' kind of way, since dudes would often talk about the same kind of nit-picky minutia we do here. I remember having a lot of discussions about how chinos need to have high hems, shoes with thin tongues or contrast soles looked the best, tops should always be slightly baggier than bottoms, proper shirt length etc.

I think the reason you don't usually see a lot of discussion and intelligent views clothing irl is that true 'style' (ugh)(I mean the kind you want to emulate) does not come from the clothes or designers. Ime it comes from exhaustively trying out different looks and interpreting the clothes through your own reference frames (music, skateboarding, art, etc).This site has tons of examples of people who make expensive, well designed clothing look like shit. Unfortunately, (and I'm painting some very broad strokes here) the stores are about the clothing and many of the SAs that work there are unbearable because they are also all about the clothing. There's some kind of weird disconnect there I can't quite express, but basically what I'm trying to say is that I'm totally cool with talking about the construction/fabrics/physical properties of the products, but my views on them as components of 'style' are totally subjective and personal and boring and kind of embarassing
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoozah View Post

I feel like I wrote this myself, lol.

frown.gifNDCIbAz.giffrown.gif
post #21 of 31
Unlike some other hobbies I enjoy (old cars, Scandinavian crime stories), interets in clothing is not something I share with any close friends (male anyway - some females are fascinated but that's another story). There's a blogger and member in Classic Menswear (Will) who wrote an eloquent piece that I think captures some of my feelings on the subject:

'Just as some men find it difficult to feel relaxed in their clothes, some men feel that they should not be interested in their clothes in the first place and, like de Balzac’s ‘beast’, they just cover themselves. I suppose that they do have a kind of authority on their side, including Hardy Amies, with his dictum about choosing one’s clothes with intelligence, putting them on with care and then forgetting all about them but the trouble is that these men miss out the first two stages.

The fear seems to be for a man to seem to be interested in his own clothes. This fear is often put about and enforced by couch potatoes who ask for nothing more from life than to watch football on the television, with a twelve pack of pilsner beer, muttering, in defence of their idleness, that this is what real men do and real men do not care about clothes; real men don’t dance, and real men certainly don’t cry.

Let’s think about it in reverse order: if we accept that Sir Winston Churchill was a real man, then there is an example of a real man who often burst into tears, even on public platforms. If real men don’t dance, what was George Raft doing (and doing superbly well), with Carole Lombard, in the film Rumba?

If real men don’t care about clothes, what are Muhammad Ali and Manny Pacquiao doing dressing as they do?

Accordingly, let the couch potatoes sneer as they like. They sneer because they want to avoid full engagement in the act of living and their condemning of certain activities enables them: first, to avoid the effort involved in taking part and, secondly, to keep in their quiet corners, hoping that they won’t be asked to show the world what they can do. If they (at least occasionally) actually stood up and took part in something other than the vicarious enjoyment of the sporting achievements of others, they might understand the simple pleasure to be derived from striving to achieve something worthwhile. Dressing well is a part of that striving for achievement. Come to that, knowing how to dance (even if not as well as George Raft) is worthwhile because, when the couch potatoes are wallflowers at a ‘do’, you won’t be and, while I don’t suggest bursting into tears at a tough business meeting, if someone close to you (even a well-loved pet) suddenly dies, one misses out on a part of living in stifling natural grief with a fear of feeling.'


http://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2012/05/masculine-interest-in-dressing.html
post #22 of 31

I never really started thinking about how I dressed until sophomore year of high-school.

Before then, I was content with wearing whatever my parents would buy for me/graphic t-shirts and camo cargo shorts. (I had quite the collection of Invader Zim shirts)

But when 2nd year of high-school came by, that's when I really wanted to fix the way I looked. I went through all of the typical "label" phases. (I.E, emo, scene, etc..)

It wasn't really so much my surroundings that inspired me, more-so my exposure to the internet and the things that were going on at lookbook.nu and stuff of the like.
 

But it wasn't really until the very beginning of last year did I really start looking into style a more serious way; and actually observing and knowing about the designers and their works.

I discovered Superfuture, and would lurk everyday through the WAYWT posts.

I would see these brands everyone would post and then google them and delve into their collections from there.

I don't really ever go out much, so I usually just stay at home and browse around the internet looking through editorials, collection releases, and interviews; and from there I picked up from what I really wanted my personal style and aesthetic to be, and really focused my attention to these designers that struck a chord with me.

 

When it comes to talking to anyone about this, apart from the people I know solely online, my small group of friends definitely don't have the same level of interest as I do.

 

I talk to my girlfriend occasionally about style though, because she also has a big interest in womenswear/menswear and is currently majoring in Fashion Design.

 

But besides that, I don't really have anyone to talk to in person when it comes to discussing clothing in-depth.

The Chicago scene when it comes to style isn't all that great either. I feel as though despite being such a big city, we definitely aren't as diverse and have the same demographic as other cities out there.

 

But recently I've found myself repeatedly going down to Saint Alfreds which is a streetwear shop here in Chicago that carries Undercover, Visvim, Bedwin, WTAPs, etc... and talking to the staff about clothing and collections, which is great because I always enjoy sharing my thoughts and hearing other's thoughts on things like this.

Also, the guy's at Independence Chicago are also really nice to talk to. I always stop by whenever I'm on the Oak street area to browse around, talk, and occasionally buy something. (I believe they're one of the very very few places here that sell Ervell)

Very cozy atmosphere, and being able to see Engineered Garments and a large Maison Kitsune collection in person is such a good experience.

 

If it wasn't for SuFu and Styleforum a year and a half ago, I definitely wouldn't have been able to develop my style like I have now.

Because I wouldn't have the facet to understand and learn more about these various designers and what they have to offer.


Edited by fishbones - 2/21/13 at 10:50pm
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post

... my girlfriend ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

My girlfriend ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbones View Post

I talk to my girlfriend ...

eek.gif come on, we're on sf...
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
jk biggrin.gif
post #24 of 31

What a wonderful thread, thanks for starting this! 

 

I've got small and scattered thoughts on the subject … 

 

***

 

I spend a large amount of time thinking about, researching, searching for and purchasing my clothing. You are all with me. You know what it's like. 

 

What I've noticed is that I increasingly feel bad about this. Actually that's wrong. I don't ever feel bad about buying. I feel bad about the time I invest. Like I should be doing something "better", whatever that is. I don't feel that way about any of my other hobbies. 

 

***

 

There's this unwritten rule (like not standing next to each other at urinals) that men aren't meant to talk to other men about clothes. Ever. And if, for some ghastly reason, you must discuss your clothes, it must be in a totally 'manly' way, sticking only to the utility or production or 'usefulness' or whatever. 

 

This seems to be true even with guys who are visibly interested in, get, fashion and style. I often see guys wearing noticeably SF-type stuff. What happens is, you clock each other, there's a knowing look, it's weird and tense, then it breaks off, you look away. You never mention it. It's like competing predators accidentally on the worn turf. 

 

I don't get this, I done condone this, but I'm victim to it. 

 

Once a dude at work who's got some serious swag quietly peeped "Is your jumper Margiella?" at me. It was weird for no reason. I pretended I didn't know what he was on about. 

 

***

The people whose looks I admire the most are the ones that seem to have their lifestyle sorted. They wear their fucking clothing. You can see it on them. They could be wearing white tees and jeans and still look awesome. You can't emulate that if you try, no matter how many fits your reblog on Tumblr.

post #25 of 31
How does one talk about fashion in general? I sort of find it a pretentious exercise. Instead, I rather talk about the design elements and merits of garments, what I like and dislike, what I think is wrong or could have been done better. That's it, nothing major and quite passive like someone posted. Maybe a mention of drape here and there and what is really fucking good or great. I've found no better place to do this than at south willard. I went to all the shops in search of enlightenment back in the day and Ryan was the only one who welcomed me but didn't pressure me. He was the only one who liked to talk about the clothes who actually knew about the clothes because he was the one who bought them for the shop. He wasn't some guy trying to make commission on me or viewed his job as a hookup for an employee discount. He was a regular guy just like me who just happened to really fucking like clothes. He was not an aspiring artist or musician and related to clothing the same way i did ie. feel, fit, context. I found myself going in there all the time because it was such a warm hospitable place, an environment in which one doesn't feel threatened. In fact I went in there so many times that I told Ryan one of these days I was going to buy something and he hardly cared. He enjoyed talking about it as much as I enjoyed hearing about it. It was a hang out spot after awhile and there were months where I would go by on a weekly basis. It is kind of like if cheers was a clothing store. Friends would come in all the time who I'd meet and then become friends with myself. Famous skaters, interior designers, surfers, etc. I swear, he has more friends call the shop than customers. I must have tried on hundreds of things while we talked about food, cars, cigars, or some artwork he was digging from his artist buddies. I remember one time when he got a raf simons shipment in when he wasn't at the shop. He had texted me and we both raced down there as I happened to have the day off that day. The three of us were unboxing shit like it was christmas, claiming what we wanted before it even hit the floor haha.

I was pretty fortunate to make lots of connections at a few other stores around LA where I could go and shoot the shit. At the margiela store they'd give me espresso, champagne, snacks while we smoked outside. Probably bought only a handful of items there but it was like a family. They'd show me things coming out, invite me to parties, gallery openings, etc. Ron herman and fred segal were my other hangouts where we would all go out to eat after the store closed. While I did pick up a lot of information from this site, a lot of it was learned just talking to people. It's information I attempt to pass on to the forum, things that go unknown until it comes out, gets regurgitated, then commonly accepted as facts. I may come off elitest, a dickhead, whatever you want to call me but ultimately I'm just trying to share some of the knowledge that has been passed on to me. There is so much information that isn't on forums and the only way to get it is by meeting people and listening to their stories. Great thread btw.
post #26 of 31
I find what goes on around me clothing wise is completely different to StyleForvm. It's almost like an interactive fashion magazine to me, like a kind of escapism. If SF reflected the world around me, it might become boring.
post #27 of 31

I hardly ever talk about fashion with any of my friends. They're simply not interested in this topic (which can be seen by the way they're dressing...).

I try to look the best way possible, but sometimes it's hard. Germany and fashion... well, it's not easy.

 

I live in Duesseldorf, a city which calls itself "Fashion-City" (because of the annual Fashion show here and b/c Duesseldorf is the homebase of many fashion agencies). Haha. Right now, there is only ONE store left, where they sell selvage denim, for example. 

We have ONE store selling Alden shoes, but they are overpriced, the staff is hostile and they don't stock too many different models.

We don't have stores selling Wolverine, another example.

 

The only decent store has it all, selvage denim, Red Wing, Filson, etc., but that stuff is pricey over here and the selection is limited. And it feels a bit awkward to go to this store each and every saturday just to check out if they have something new. The staff there is very friendly, thank god, so they don't mind me hanging in the store all the time.

 

So I'm limited to online stores, but even these have limited range of stuff here in Germany. Last solution: orddering in England or USA. GB is ok, no taxes, no customs. I order all my shoes there (Trickers). USA... customs if you exceed 110,- Euro including shipping costs cloud.gif

 

Thank god I'm usually 3-4 times a year in the states. Whenever I go there I try to order as much as possible from US online stores to be shipped to my hotel in the states, and furthermore there's usually shopping tours included in my stay there. That is ok when going to NY, Boston or LA, but South Florida is bad. Ever tried to buy Alden's in Florida? Good luck!

post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

I find what goes on around me clothing wise is completely different to StyleForvm. It's almost like an interactive fashion magazine to me, like a kind of escapism. If SF reflected the world around me, it might become boring.

Where do you live?
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by click here View Post

Where do you live?

China, although I'm actually British.

The thread I've been mostly active in has been the Unidentified Fashion Objects - The fake, phoney and just plain funny. Which is largely due to location, the people around me and what really interests me. However I don't wear this stuff myself if I can help it, except in school sometimes because the students find it amusing. Although I read many other threads, just out of interest and for the drama sometimes.
Edited by MikeDT - 2/23/13 at 6:17am
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andreas1965 View Post

I hardly ever talk about fashion with any of my friends. They're simply not interested in this topic (which can be seen by the way they're dressing...).
I try to look the best way possible, but sometimes it's hard. Germany and fashion... well, it's not easy.

I live in Duesseldorf, a city which calls itself "Fashion-City" (because of the annual Fashion show here and b/c Duesseldorf is the homebase of many fashion agencies). Haha. Right now, there is only ONE store left, where they sell selvage denim, for example
We have ONE store selling Alden shoes, but they are overpriced, the staff is hostile and they don't stock too many different models.
We don't have stores selling Wolverine, another example.

The only decent store has it all, selvage denim, Red Wing, Filson, etc., but that stuff is pricey over here and the selection is limited. And it feels a bit awkward to go to this store each and every saturday just to check out if they have something new. The staff there is very friendly, thank god, so they don't mind me hanging in the store all the time.

So I'm limited to online stores, but even these have limited range of stuff here in Germany. Last solution: orddering in England or USA. GB is ok, no taxes, no customs. I order all my shoes there (Trickers). USA... customs if you exceed 110,- Euro including shipping costs cloud.gif


Thank god I'm usually 3-4 times a year in the states. Whenever I go there I try to order as much as possible from US online stores to be shipped to my hotel in the states, and furthermore there's usually shopping tours included in my stay there. That is ok when going to NY, Boston or LA, but South Florida is bad. Ever tried to buy Alden's in Florida? Good luck!

Ich bin sicher, dass es in Düsseldorf wesentlich mehr als nur ein Geschäft gibt, wo du selvage denim bekommst. Spontan fallen mir P&C, Anson's und ein Designer Laden in Richtung Altstadt an einem Wochenmarkt ein. Keine Ahnung wie der heißt. Wolverine Schuhe kannst du ebenfalls bei Anson's kaufen.
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