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The Hong Kong Tailors Thread - Page 25

post #361 of 2029

I know HKG real estate prices yet I am certain Peter Lee owns that property he operates out of.  (4200$ in Sep 2012 to 5500$ in Nov 2012 for canvassed suit is a 31% increase.) Not to mention that they had already raised prices Jan 2012.

post #362 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by addedfuel View Post

I know HKG real estate prices yet I am certain Peter Lee owns that property he operates out of.  (4200$ in Sep 2012 to 5500$ in Nov 2012 for canvassed suit is a 31% increase.) Not to mention that they had already raised prices Jan 2012.

If the demand is there they are going to raise prices.
post #363 of 2029

I am a total believer in demand and supply and it's obvious they are getting enough demand to justify this huge increase but I was just shocked.

post #364 of 2029
I don't think Lee's work is anything to write home about if his shirts are a good example of his work. Cheap, yes. But I'd skip Lee and spend a little more to use Chan if one must have a suit in HK.
post #365 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

I don't think Lee's work is anything to write home about if his shirts are a good example of his work. Cheap, yes. But I'd skip Lee and spend a little more to use Chan if one must have a suit in HK.

I would say Lee's suit are a good step up from Hugo Boss. But one really want a nice suit that is akin to the top RTW, go to Chan for Italian or Gordon Yao for the quasi-savile row experience. Obviously there are better choice in HK but if you only speaks English I suggest you to stick with those two.

Shirts from Lee is fine, fully serviceable, soft canvassed collar, and definitely represents good value, just ask them to not make their french cuff to long and have a best fit coat for the fitting, so everything can be correct at early stage.

Lee has been promoted far too much, there are plenty of tailor that reaches Lee's level without the same price tag, I guess language is the problem.
post #366 of 2029
Well then... I did email Gordon yao but I was hoping to spend closer to 1k vs 1.5k which is what Gordon quoted me for nicer materials. I believe chan was the same. Is it worth it for that jump?
post #367 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

I would say Lee's suit are a good step up from Hugo Boss. But one really want a nice suit that is akin to the top RTW, go to Chan for Italian or Gordon Yao for the quasi-savile row experience. Obviously there are better choice in HK but if you only speaks English I suggest you to stick with those two.
Shirts from Lee is fine, fully serviceable, soft canvassed collar, and definitely represents good value, just ask them to not make their french cuff to long and have a best fit coat for the fitting, so everything can be correct at early stage.
Lee has been promoted far too much, there are plenty of tailor that reaches Lee's level without the same price tag, I guess language is the problem.

I thought they were both fairly generic, flexible styles? I have a WW Chan and it seems more middle of the road than Italian.
post #368 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by statuskuo View Post

Well then... I did email Gordon yao but I was hoping to spend closer to 1k vs 1.5k which is what Gordon quoted me for nicer materials. I believe chan was the same. Is it worth it for that jump?

VBC material is the $1200 range and the $1500 range and above are Zegna, Holland and Sherry, Scabal and the like. Chan and Yao are similiarly priced. The higher priced materials do have a better feel.
post #369 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by emc894 View Post

I thought they were both fairly generic, flexible styles? I have a WW Chan and it seems more middle of the road than Italian.

From what I have seen, Chan had forgot how to make their good old bulletproof british shape, and Gordon have never learnt the Italian way. This is the perspective I have seen from my friends who uses both, and the local orders. I don't know how Chan does with his oversea business especially.
post #370 of 2029
It's true that Chan no longer makes a classic English silhouette. Their default tends to be lean, rather than with drape at the chest etc. Yao might be your next best bet.

You're already going to be paying 1k, Paying 200-500 more for a suit that will look better, is well worth it.

The reason why I didn't like Lee is because I had a bad xp there - Ordered one shirt from their house fabrics and when the shirt was completed, cuffs were of a different shade. I think the fabric was too old. Both my friend and I (and at first, even the Chinese man there) noticed it, but the salesman (an Indian guy) refused to admit it. But I didn't kick up a huge fuss since their shirts (at least for someone visiting from abroad, and who generally uses more expensive shirt-makers) are cheap. I just took all my fabrics I had left with them to another shirt-maker. Thank goodness they hadn't cut those! After my first laundry, three buttons came off. And then one sleeve button came off on my 5th to 6th wear. I didn't have that particular problem with any of my Chan, AC, and from the shirt-makers I typically use.

But look, they're decently priced. If that's a key concern, go with Lee. But if you can afford to pay 1000 dollars, I think that shelling out 200-400 more to use a better will be worth it. Alternatively, have Chan only make your coat.
post #371 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

It's true that Chan no longer makes a classic English silhouette. Their default tends to be lean, rather than with drape at the chest etc. Yao might be your next best bet.
You're already going to be paying 1k, Paying 200-500 more for a suit that will look better, is well worth it.
The reason why I didn't like Lee is because I had a bad xp there - Ordered one shirt from their house fabrics and when the shirt was completed, cuffs were of a different shade. I think the fabric was too old. Both my friend and I (and at first, even the Chinese man there) noticed it, but the salesman (an Indian guy) refused to admit it. But I didn't kick up a huge fuss since their shirts (at least for someone visiting from abroad, and who generally uses more expensive shirt-makers) are cheap. I just took all my fabrics I had left with them to another shirt-maker. Thank goodness they hadn't cut those! After my first laundry, three buttons came off. And then one sleeve button came off on my 5th to 6th wear. I didn't have that particular problem with any of my Chan, AC, and from the shirt-makers I typically use.
But look, they're decently priced. If that's a key concern, go with Lee. But if you can afford to pay 1000 dollars, I think that shelling out 200-400 more to use a better will be worth it. Alternatively, have Chan only make your coat.

My god, I am surprised, my shirts from Lee was very good for value, only some minor tweaking on the sleeve length and width.
post #372 of 2029
Does anybody have any experience with JC & Son?
http://www.jcandsontailor.com/

Thanks
post #373 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayJay85 View Post

Does anybody have any experience with JC & Son?
http://www.jcandsontailor.com/
Thanks

The prices for suits are affordable and Johny seems to have an impressive background in tailoring.
post #374 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

It's true that Chan no longer makes a classic English silhouette. Their default tends to be lean, rather than with drape at the chest etc. Yao might be your next best bet.
You're already going to be paying 1k, Paying 200-500 more for a suit that will look better, is well worth it.
The reason why I didn't like Lee is because I had a bad xp there - Ordered one shirt from their house fabrics and when the shirt was completed, cuffs were of a different shade. I think the fabric was too old. Both my friend and I (and at first, even the Chinese man there) noticed it, but the salesman (an Indian guy) refused to admit it. But I didn't kick up a huge fuss since their shirts (at least for someone visiting from abroad, and who generally uses more expensive shirt-makers) are cheap. I just took all my fabrics I had left with them to another shirt-maker. Thank goodness they hadn't cut those! After my first laundry, three buttons came off. And then one sleeve button came off on my 5th to 6th wear. I didn't have that particular problem with any of my Chan, AC, and from the shirt-makers I typically use.
But look, they're decently priced. If that's a key concern, go with Lee. But if you can afford to pay 1000 dollars, I think that shelling out 200-400 more to use a better will be worth it. Alternatively, have Chan only make your coat.

Sorry to hear you had a bad experience. I've had 40+ shirts made from him and no buttons have ever fallen off.
post #375 of 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewfoot View Post

Sorry to hear you had a bad experience. I've had 40+ shirts made from him and no buttons have ever fallen off.

Yes, but I have to admit that he's relatively reasonably-priced, even with falling buttons, so I'm not complaining too much. I don't expect to get an AC shirt at B. Lee price.

But I really couldn't accept that they refused to admit that the colour was different on the cuffs when it was evident, and even the Chinese man at first agreed, then following a quick conversation in Cantonese, later disagreed. Don't believe that this should happen on any shirt, any any price point.

But you reckon I ought to try them again, since you've had such a stellar experience? Might be that my shirt was the odd exception.

*Not sure if it affected how the buttons were sewn, but I chose the thick MOP buttons.
Edited by bboysdontcryy - 11/26/12 at 12:38pm
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