or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Hong Kong Tailors Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Hong Kong Tailors Thread - Page 188

post #2806 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

@hifilover

Lizet cutting is pretty common in garment manufacture. The good bit is consistency and thinner jointing parts (nil seam ends on the side).

Bad bit is lack of human touch (unless they have tweat a good bit on numbers input into the machine for pattern) and there is a thin smell of burnt if you are close enough.

Add_911 , your input teaches me a lot. Wish to learn more from you.
post #2807 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hifilover View Post

Add_911 , your input teaches me a lot. Wish to learn more from you.

As long as one makes enough mistakes.

Entrenchment takes time.
post #2808 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

As long as one makes enough mistakes.

Entrenchment takes time.

A long way for me to go.
post #2809 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatsbyu View Post

In my opinion, I don't think the tailors mentioned can effectively execute Napoli Tailoring (esp Ambrosi, crazy hand stitching work) because Napoli Tailors make coat quite different from Chinese Tailors.

But, I find Brown Tailor is quite good at copying style, though you can't expect the same level of needle work (which is the soul of Napoli Tailoring).

And WWchan provides the best craftsmanship among the tailors you listed because their company has strong QC checking and requirements to their workers.

Lai, which I mentioned several times, is a good tailor on doing traditional shanghai tailoring. Hand stitching is very good in my opinion. He also tried to do something more modern. But I don't think he is opened and capable to substantially reengineer his coat making method unless another overseas trained tailor (which is very very very hard to find as most of good fashion guys joined RTW industry in HK) teach him.

And Dream Bespoke, which is quite tricky to me. Based on their work I saw and my visit, I think they modified traditional pattern commonly used in HK, some of the adjustment like trimming supplies are very good. I admire the shop owner's commitment on doing something special. But it seems overrated especially in another local famous forum.

Generally speaking, HK tailors are not trained under Italian system. Even though some of them can make coat look similar from outside (eg Neapolitan shoulder or Milanese buttonhole). You won't feel the same when you wear the coat. Just because the coat is done in different way. It is not a good to ask the tailor here to copy other countries' styles. Why HK can't do tailoring like Korea and Japan ? They structure own tailoring techniques and establish their country style.

Tai Pan Row in IFC, Shanghai Tailoring? Style and Construction ?
post #2810 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

Actually I had collected the Chan suit and it is now used as my office beater for fridays where I can get change to shorts and T-shirt after work.

In general, Chan suit seems to be very neatly made, the handwork seems to be refined. However, the cut of the jacket is very medicore, the pattern are poorly adjusted, resulting an overall soft-classic round look but with over short coat lengths.

Another matter is I find the coat to be too light, so light that the product when touched feels like a high end RTW making. You cannot feel the juicy parts where bespoke tailors will put inside the coat (e.g. touching a Savile Row coat nowdays you will realize how much "SXXX" a tailor puts inside for the drape", this is no existence in Chan's coat.

Although it may be fault on my part, the pattern I choose "3-button" did not warrent the cutter to cut with some consideration into it. There is no belly on the lapel and the lapel roll was made a touch too high. Thereby making a flat and uninterested looking shape, even if the lapel roll itself is here.

If they want me to return again, at least they have to get my lengths right, secondly is they have to improve their cut rather than using a academic proportion without any adjustment.

Note: given how thin the coat seams are, I have suspicion that the coat is cut by lazer and not by hand.

This is interesting. It is some years since I have had a Chan suit - indeed before 'Handover' and their quality then was mixed - I do recall that the patterns were generated by a computer which used to sit in the far end away from the door of their showroom.

Given your eye for overall quality of their performance this suggests that they cannot meet what I would be looking for and even with reference to being "very neatly made", I do not think that I would be happy with them. Many thanks for your review.
post #2811 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

This is interesting. It is some years since I have had a Chan suit - indeed before 'Handover' and their quality then was mixed - I do recall that the patterns were generated by a computer which used to sit in the far end away from the door of their showroom.

Given your eye for overall quality of their performance this suggests that they cannot meet what I would be looking for and even with reference to being "very neatly made", I do not think that I would be happy with them. Many thanks for your review.

Lets put it this way... If you want a Tom Ford or Zegna MTM, I have no doubt in suggesting them to visit WW Chan and they probably will get a better (and cheaper as well) result then actually paying for the branded MTM.

However, as a fan of bespoke, besides fit and constructions, I think the most cherished matter is the cutter and coatmaker's personal touch. This in my opinion actually worth more than "a correction fit in first go"

Seriously WW Chan ain't bad, in fact they just lack a little "personality" in their cut.
post #2812 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

Lets put it this way... If you want a Tom Ford or Zegna MTM, I have no doubt in suggesting them to visit WW Chan and they probably will get a better (and cheaper as well) result then actually paying for the branded MTM.

However, as a fan of bespoke, besides fit and constructions, I think the most cherished matter is the cutter and coatmaker's personal touch. This in my opinion actually worth more than "a correction fit in first go"

Seriously WW Chan ain't bad, in fact they just lack a little "personality" in their cut.

I don't want anybody's MTM and I am not attracted to names in the slightest.

I too want to trust the cutter to produce a suit which meets the standard I require, a very 'soft' drape and that does require the cutter to have some interest in his client and to use his skill. I abandoned one Savile Row cutter (trained in one of the houses which likes to think itself a cut above the rest) after two commissions as I concluded that he was simply running a production line with minimal interest in his client and was guilty of allowing some very poor finishing out of his work room.

Your opinion is both valid and valuable and confirms the relationship which is essential between both parties and something with which I entirely agree. Chan has become very large and even in 1996 I was not overly impressed but this is the first time someone has honestly summed up what is missing rather looking at them in awe. I will think twice about resuming any relationship with them.
post #2813 of 3698
Grand Tailor meets my budget but only Mr Add_911 report. Hope to hear more before heading to.
post #2814 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

I don't want anybody's MTM and I am not attracted to names in the slightest.

I too want to trust the cutter to produce a suit which meets the standard I require, a very 'soft' drape and that does require the cutter to have some interest in his client and to use his skill. I abandoned one Savile Row cutter (trained in one of the houses which likes to think itself a cut above the rest) after two commissions as I concluded that he was simply running a production line with minimal interest in his client and was guilty of allowing some very poor finishing out of his work room.

Your opinion is both valid and valuable and confirms the relationship which is essential between both parties and something with which I entirely agree. Chan has become very large and even in 1996 I was not overly impressed but this is the first time someone has honestly summed up what is missing rather looking at them in awe. I will think twice about resuming any relationship with them.

I do think WW Chan makes a very neat suit, but it has no personality. You can feel the cut and the shoulder is relatively "industrial". The Very good part is Chan manage to cut a very corrected fit suit with some on-trend features. If you are looking for uniformity, I can't think of another place in Hong Kong to go.

One thing I noticed about Chan is that their lapel, be it in any design, has virtually no belly. I also noted that Chan's coat interior is very clean and lightweight that they may not have inseams therein.

I will say for those who try Chan, make sure you 100% TELL THE FITTER WHAT YOU WANT AT BASTE FITTING. They always stressed that once the coat passed the 2nd stage alteration will be difficult.

I am rather surprised with your Chan experience in 1996.... I would have suspected back then they have a full team of proper cutters and their garment would be much more "tasteful" back then.

I have strong feelings that for celebrities, Chan outsource cutters and only keep the coat making process in house.

Put it this way, back then when I wanted to get a Tom Ford suit, I should have saved up the money and go to them instead. Now I am more interested in the cutter's twist on garments.

cutter's personality is why in contrast with many SR firms, many "Italian-esquire" oversea tailors became so popular nowadays because their advertisement at least manifest a strong personality. Many SR firms also cuts a very "uniform" bespoke garments. Obviously I knew some good cats around Savile Row but some firms also shares the "total corrected look".

For new comers, Although it may sound harsh but please do not consider tailor solely on the amount you can bear, this is really a bad criteria because you often overlook many things, including the "house-cut" and tailor's characteristic which are actually the most important out of all.
post #2815 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

I do think WW Chan makes a very neat suit, but it has no personality. You can feel the cut and the shoulder is relatively "industrial". The Very good part is Chan manage to cut a very corrected fit suit with some on-trend features. If you are looking for uniformity, I can't think of another place in Hong Kong to go.

One thing I noticed about Chan is that their lapel, be it in any design, has virtually no belly. I also noted that Chan's coat interior is very clean and lightweight that they may not have inseams therein.

I will say for those who try Chan, make sure you 100% TELL THE FITTER WHAT YOU WANT AT BASTE FITTING. They always stressed that once the coat passed the 2nd stage alteration will be difficult.

I am rather surprised with your Chan experience in 1996.... I would have suspected back then they have a full team of proper cutters and their garment would be much more "tasteful" back then.

I have strong feelings that for celebrities, Chan outsource cutters and only keep the coat making process in house.

Put it this way, back then when I wanted to get a Tom Ford suit, I should have saved up the money and go to them instead. Now I am more interested in the cutter's twist on garments.

cutter's personality is why in contrast with many SR firms, many "Italian-esquire" oversea tailors became so popular nowadays because their advertisement at least manifest a strong personality. Many SR firms also cuts a very "uniform" bespoke garments. Obviously I knew some good cats around Savile Row but some firms also shares the "total corrected look".

For new comers, Although it may sound harsh but please do not consider tailor solely on the amount you can bear, this is really a bad criteria because you often overlook many things, including the "house-cut" and tailor's characteristic which are actually the most important out of all.

Very good report. I have learnt something again.
post #2816 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

I don't want anybody's MTM and I am not attracted to names in the slightest.

I too want to trust the cutter to produce a suit which meets the standard I require, a very 'soft' drape and that does require the cutter to have some interest in his client and to use his skill. I abandoned one Savile Row cutter (trained in one of the houses which likes to think itself a cut above the rest) after two commissions as I concluded that he was simply running a production line with minimal interest in his client and was guilty of allowing some very poor finishing out of his work room.

Your opinion is both valid and valuable and confirms the relationship which is essential between both parties and something with which I entirely agree. Chan has become very large and even in 1996 I was not overly impressed but this is the first time someone has honestly summed up what is missing rather looking at them in awe. I will think twice about resuming any relationship with them.

Other than GY and Chan, any experience of Hong Kong tailors?
post #2817 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hifilover View Post

Other than GY and Chan, any experience of Hong Kong tailors?

Gordon Yao has met requirements well over many years and so there is little purpose to be served by changing: Chan is the only one I might think about.
post #2818 of 3698
I think that by default Chan makes a nicely finished suit that is pseudo-Neapolitan, quasi-"modern", and on the whole bland. It's a suit designed by committee (or by the internet). But it's possible to get a suit that doesn't fit this description if you make clear to Patrick what you want. Can you get a suit with the style and personality of an A&S double-breasted? Probably not. But Chan can and will make a very nice suit if you know what you want and ask for it. Consider the garments in Whoopee's old post.
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee View Post

I happen to have pics of the front and back because my dad really likes the design and wants a near copy made of it. Except he wants it done as a 2 piece suit in millionaire cashmere jacketing. As an aside, for those with experience with non-suiting cashmere for trousers, how bad an idea is this? I've explained about the baggy knees and that they'll hardly survive a couple years' wear, but I couldn't get through. The fragility is obvious. More important to him I think is: will this look bad? It's a greenish herringbone with light blue windowpane. Will cashmere jacketing drape poorly? I'd appreciate any advice, as I obviously don't want him throwing money at something which will look awful. Anyway, here are the pics. It's really comfortable because the cloth is so soft and the coat is cut so close but has that centre pleat and drape in the back to allow for superbly free movement. In response to thinman and chorse, this faux-donegal feels like a sweater and tailors wonderfully; however, it is not durable. Many have complimented me on the cloth and design of the coat, but I can't take all the credit for the latter. A Christopher Bailey/Burberry coat inspired me, though I like to think I improved on it.

The following is a three piece suit I received recently. I'm really pleased with it even though I've yet to break it in.

The camera clicked when I was preparing a pose to show the armholes; this turned out better than the staged shot.
Here with the vest
post #2819 of 3698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Pink View Post

I think that by default Chan makes a nicely finished suit that is pseudo-Neapolitan, quasi-"modern", and on the whole bland. It's a suit designed by committee (or by the internet). But it's possible to get a suit that doesn't fit this description if you make clear to Patrick what you want. Can you get a suit with the style and personality of an A&S double-breasted? Probably not. But Chan can and will make a very nice suit if you know what you want and ask for it. Consider the garments in Whoopee's old post.

Nice.
post #2820 of 3698
To be honest the example above makes the man look very hollow. This is becuase the great contrast between the man's chest's volume and the waist taper.

Unless it is expressly the client's wishes and his awkward bofy shape... I would have ask for a more straight cut on the shape of the coat.

I think there is a thin line between client's personal preference and what actually looks good and balance. I think most tailor listen too much to the former and forgot the latter.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Hong Kong Tailors Thread