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The Hong Kong Tailors Thread - Page 183

post #2731 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatsbyu View Post


Similar ?! Gosh, it is really a tough business.


We wouldn't say it's remotely similar. But for most people, it seems similar or can't tell the difference

post #2732 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

Many thanks for posting, it is going to be a good addition to your wardrobe your excellent skill and discernment. The final photograph captures your sills superbly even in its half finished state. That you supply your own trimmings to some marks this out as well. All this is one of the reasons why I find a view of the whole of the inside of the jacket shows the attention to detail by the tailor/cutter - or its absence.

Are you having the trousers without braces or is there absence merely because it is a fitting.

I should have take the inside of the fitting coat in my first fitting but I forgot. I am sure another chance will come by in my next commission.

In this second fitting, they have not attach the braces buttons yet so I did not use any braces during the second fitting.

Hopefully this gave some more insight to members here. Actually I do recall Lai and Grand Tailor also put canvass to the jacket and the waistcoat.

But for this project, I can say WW Chan did a neat construction job.
post #2733 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

In this second fitting, they have not attach the braces buttons yet so I did not use any braces during the second fitting.

But for this project, I can say WW Chan did a neat construction job.

When I was fitted at AMHC, they used a brace with clips
post #2734 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

I should have take the inside of the fitting coat in my first fitting but I forgot. I am sure another chance will come by in my next commission.

In this second fitting, they have not attach the braces buttons yet so I did not use any braces during the second fitting.

Hopefully this gave some more insight to members here. Actually I do recall Lai and Grand Tailor also put canvass to the jacket and the waistcoat.

But for this project, I can say WW Chan did a neat construction job.

Thanks .

It is actually the inside of the finished coat that is of interest, the construction is interesting to confirm how it has been made. The inside finishing of some reputable tailors is often poor - as I have found to my cost. That was by a one-time Anderson and Sheppard trained cutter of considerable experience who should simply not have let both suits out of his shop. That taught me a valuable lesson.
Edited by GBR - 9/24/15 at 12:35pm
post #2735 of 3700

The Lai Si Fu Operation feat. Michael -- A Brief Review

 

I had the pleasure to have had Lai Si Fu to produce a few pieces (CMT) for me. Lai Si Fu's workshop was located away from the financial districts of Hong Kong in a quaint area called Sham Shui Po. Not surprisingly, you will not find 'extravagance or ritz' here, that is more paradigmatic of the notable tailor houses in Central, or even Tsim Sha Tsui. Rather, Lai Si Fu's operation is a straight to the point, 'no frills' experience. A much better process focused on the clothes themselves, I take it.

 

The middleman, Michael, acted as a mediator between Lai Si Fu and I, translating various sartorial terms and offering much advice that an ignorant client, like myself, cannot do without. Michael is knowledgeable, efficient, and responsible -- I can learn a thing or two from him.

 

The house cut comprises of thin shoulders, a modern aggressive taper, and some identifiable Shanghai/Taipan Row-esque features. Take a look yourself.

 

3 Piece Minnis Fresco - Single-Breasted Peak Lapel

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were, however, some minor handiwork and fit issues, especially with the trousers. However, Michael assures me that these can be improved the next time around. After all, this was only my first iteration.

 

Tweed/Cashmere Jacket

 

 

 

 

Bonus Pictures

 

 

 

 

The months immediately preceding Christmas and the New Year are most often the busiest for tailors, and Lai Si Fu is no exception. I gather that they are currently swamped with production, so expect a long delivery time.

 

Finally, I have commissioned a two-piece Midnight suit from Lai Si Fu. And I am confident that we will be able to resolve some of the minor issues present in our first iteration of the suit. I will promptly report back with full details when I have received delivery.


Edited by klp2332 - 10/1/15 at 5:25pm
post #2736 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by klp2332 View Post

The Lai Si Fu Operation feat. Michael -- A Brief Review

I had the pleasure to have had Lai Si Fu to produce a few pieces (CMT) for me. Lai Si Fu's workshop was located away from the financial districts of Hong Kong in a quaint area called Sham Shui Po. Not surprisingly, you will not find 'extravagance or ritz' here, that is more paradigmatic of the notable tailor houses in Central, or even Tsim Sha Tsui. Rather, Lai Si Fu's operation is a straight to the point, 'no frills' experience. A much better process focused on the clothes themselves, I take it.

The middleman, Michael, acted as a mediator between Lai Si Fu and I, translating various sartorial terms and offering much advice that an ignorant client, like myself, cannot do without. Michael is knowledgeable, efficient, and responsible -- I can learn a thing or two from him.

The house cut comprises of thin shoulders, a modern aggressive taper, and some identifiable Shanghai/Taipan Row-esque features. Take a look yourself.

3 Piece Minnis Fresco - Single-Breasted Peak Lapel
















There were, however, some minor handiwork and fit issues, especially with the trousers. However, Michael assures me that these can be improved the next time around. After all, this was only my first iteration.

Tweed/Cashmere Jacket










Bonus Pictures








The months immediately preceding Christmas and the New Year are most often the busiest for tailors, and Lai Si Fu is no exception. I gather that they are currently swamped with production, so expect a long delivery time.

Finally, I have commissioned a two-piece Midnight suit from, Lai Si Fu. I am confident that we will be able to resolve some of the minor issues present in our first iteration of the suit. I will promptly report back with full details when I have received delivery.

Looks pretty solid. Is that the 8/9 oz. or 9/10 oz. Fresco?
post #2737 of 3700

It should be the 9/10 oz.

post #2738 of 3700
I love Fresco.
post #2739 of 3700

Fresco loves you too <3

post #2740 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by klp2332 View Post

The Lai Si Fu Operation feat. Michael -- A Brief Review Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I had the pleasure to have had Lai Si Fu to produce a few pieces (CMT) for me. Lai Si Fu's workshop was located away from the financial districts of Hong Kong in a quaint area called Sham Shui Po. Not surprisingly, you will not find 'extravagance or ritz' here, that is more paradigmatic of the notable tailor houses in Central, or even Tsim Sha Tsui. Rather, Lai Si Fu's operation is a straight to the point, 'no frills' experience. A much better process focused on the clothes themselves, I take it.

The middleman, Michael, acted as a mediator between Lai Si Fu and I, translating various sartorial terms and offering much advice that an ignorant client, like myself, cannot do without. Michael is knowledgeable, efficient, and responsible -- I can learn a thing or two from him.

The house cut comprises of thin shoulders, a modern aggressive taper, and some identifiable Shanghai/Taipan Row-esque features. Take a look yourself.

3 Piece Minnis Fresco - Single-Breasted Peak Lapel
















There were, however, some minor handiwork and fit issues, especially with the trousers. However, Michael assures me that these can be improved the next time around. After all, this was only my first iteration.

Tweed/Cashmere Jacket










Bonus Pictures








The months immediately preceding Christmas and the New Year are most often the busiest for tailors, and Lai Si Fu is no exception. I gather that they are currently swamped with production, so expect a long delivery time.

Finally, I have commissioned a two-piece Midnight suit from Lai Si Fu. And I am confident that we will be able to resolve some of the minor issues present in our first iteration of the suit. I will promptly report back with full details when I have received delivery.

Thank you for your detailed review work.

From your pictures, those looks lovely.

However, I will like to discuss more generally on Lai's cutting style. One thing that really come across my mind is his "forward" cutting. I always feel he pushes the majority of volume on the front and aggressively trimmed down the proportion at the back. While I am sure with his proportion movement would still be fine, but do you think that a more balanced cut would make one's body shape more flattering? At current most of the masculine lines are at the back but at the front it looks slightly flat and lean.

Another matter is I find Lai's coat sits rather low with a long collar band. this makes the coat looks like a "pullover" rather than a structured external piece.

With the forward cut, I find Lai's trouser sometimes (depends the taper you wanted) looks imbalanced. Since most of the volume is at the front, sometimes I find the legs looks "crooked" with his trouser on.

This is really served as a general discussion and in no way in disrepute to Lai's craftmanship, in fact besides some gritty construction work, he is probably one of the best one can find in Hong Kong for the price tag.

p.s. I had been in discussion with Lai on how to make a more balanced cut.
post #2741 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

Thank you for your detailed review work.

From your pictures, those looks lovely.

However, I will like to discuss more generally on Lai's cutting style. One thing that really come across my mind is his "forward" cutting. I always feel he pushes the majority of volume on the front and aggressively trimmed down the proportion at the back. While I am sure with his proportion movement would still be fine, but do you think that a more balanced cut would make one's body shape more flattering? At current most of the masculine lines are at the back but at the front it looks slightly flat and lean.

Another matter is I find Lai's coat sits rather low with a long collar band. this makes the coat looks like a "pullover" rather than a structured external piece.

With the forward cut, I find Lai's trouser sometimes (depends the taper you wanted) looks imbalanced. Since most of the volume is at the front, sometimes I find the legs looks "crooked" with his trouser on.

This is really served as a general discussion and in no way in disrepute to Lai's craftmanship, in fact besides some gritty construction work, he is probably one of the best one can find in Hong Kong for the price tag.

p.s. I had been in discussion with Lai on how to make a more
balanced cut.[/q

Poor me, cannot understand.
post #2742 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

Thank you for your detailed review work.

From your pictures, those looks lovely.

However, I will like to discuss more generally on Lai's cutting style. One thing that really come across my mind is his "forward" cutting. I always feel he pushes the majority of volume on the front and aggressively trimmed down the proportion at the back. While I am sure with his proportion movement would still be fine, but do you think that a more balanced cut would make one's body shape more flattering? At current most of the masculine lines are at the back but at the front it looks slightly flat and lean.

Another matter is I find Lai's coat sits rather low with a long collar band. this makes the coat looks like a "pullover" rather than a structured external piece.

With the forward cut, I find Lai's trouser sometimes (depends the taper you wanted) looks imbalanced. Since most of the volume is at the front, sometimes I find the legs looks "crooked" with his trouser on.

This is really served as a general discussion and in no way in disrepute to Lai's craftmanship, in fact besides some gritty construction work, he is probably one of the best one can find in Hong Kong for the price tag.

p.s. I had been in discussion with Lai on how to make a more balanced cut.

Lai uses crooked cutting. He executed it correctly. And you are asking him to straighten the coat.
post #2743 of 3700
@hifilover.... perhaps the discussion is on cutting style rather then correctness of work. I am wondering whether his default really always make one look better.

@Gatsbyu... my underatanding of a crooked is different, pls educate me on this.... i think the cut is somehow Italian influenced.
post #2744 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatsbyu View Post

Lai uses crooked cutting. He executed it correctly. And you are asking him to straighten the coat.

Does W.W. Chan use crooked cutting ?
post #2745 of 3700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hifilover View Post

Does W.W. Chan use crooked cutting ?

I dont think so... at least not my order

Btw what is ur idea of crooked cut?
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