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Why Will is so great - Page 2

post #16 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Makoto Chan View Post

Will's such a pleasant writer that I enjoy reading anyway. Right? He never makes me feel bad about not eating caviar or ironing my own shirts or not buying "the perfect shade of wine" necktie.

Definitely.
post #17 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Makoto Chan View Post


Will's such a pleasant writer that I enjoy reading anyway. Right? He never makes me feel bad about not eating caviar or ironing my own shirts or not buying "the perfect shade of wine" necktie.

 

And that makes all the difference.

post #18 of 47
Will is a nice guy. In ye olden days, he was also very kind to folks new to fine clothing - sharing his thoughts and knowledge. And what he's done with ASW is pretty remarkable. Will's posts were always good, but he's also added a number of great guest bloggers that always make the site worth a visit.
post #19 of 47
and his video on how to polish cordovan shoes is great. although, i'm still waiting for him to post the full-length version
post #20 of 47
One day later, I can say this with relatively conclusiveness -- Will is not as controversial as Vox. Either that, or the Vox thread is one whole gigantic attempt to make a satire out of Vox's proclivity to derail threads and go off-tangent.
post #21 of 47
Great taste, great prose, great guy. Respect.
post #22 of 47
I like this post of his. Not new, of course.

'Just as some men find it difficult to feel relaxed in their clothes, some men feel that they should not be interested in their clothes in the first place and, like de Balzac’s ‘beast’, they just cover themselves. I suppose that they do have a kind of authority on their side, including Hardy Amies, with his dictum about choosing one’s clothes with intelligence, putting them on with care and then forgetting all about them but the trouble is that these men miss out the first two stages.

The fear seems to be for a man to seem to be interested in his own clothes. This fear is often put about and enforced by couch potatoes who ask for nothing more from life than to watch football on the television, with a twelve pack of pilsner beer, muttering, in defence of their idleness, that this is what real men do and real men do not care about clothes; real men don’t dance, and real men certainly don’t cry.

Let’s think about it in reverse order: if we accept that Sir Winston Churchill was a real man, then there is an example of a real man who often burst into tears, even on public platforms. If real men don’t dance, what was George Raft doing (and doing superbly well), with Carole Lombard, in the film Rumba?

If real men don’t care about clothes, what are Muhammad Ali and Manny Pacquiao doing dressing as they do?

Accordingly, let the couch potatoes sneer as they like. They sneer because they want to avoid full engagement in the act of living and their condemning of certain activities enables them: first, to avoid the effort involved in taking part and, secondly, to keep in their quiet corners, hoping that they won’t be asked to show the world what they can do. If they (at least occasionally) actually stood up and took part in something other than the vicarious enjoyment of the sporting achievements of others, they might understand the simple pleasure to be derived from striving to achieve something worthwhile. Dressing well is a part of that striving for achievement. Come to that, knowing how to dance (even if not as well as George Raft) is worthwhile because, when the couch potatoes are wallflowers at a ‘do’, you won’t be and, while I don’t suggest bursting into tears at a tough business meeting, if someone close to you (even a well-loved pet) suddenly dies, one misses out on a part of living in stifling natural grief with a fear of feeling.'


http://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2012/05/masculine-interest-in-dressing.html
post #23 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Because he is a guy who sells men's clothing that doesn't dress like a guy who sells men's clothing.

He is a menswear blogger who doesn't dress like a menswear blogger.

Oh come he does dress like a blogger and he dresses in a manner that few can afford to emulate. Whilst what he sells is good stuff and I don't doubt service is good, he does sell to a very narrow niche.
post #24 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

Oh come he does dress like a blogger and he dresses in a manner that few can afford to emulate. Whilst what he sells is good stuff and I don't doubt service is good, he does sell to a very narrow niche.
I am sure you can find some blogger-like examples. but for the most part he dresses like, as Mark Seitelman says, a grown-up. In any event, Will has pretty much been doing the same thing for years and years - pre-internet in any event. No doubt, his tastes have evolved and have been influenced by as well as influenced the internet, but I don't think he is in the #menswear category by any means.
post #25 of 47
There are certain gimmicks and flourishes that mark someone as dressing like a blogger. Never wearing socks. Decorative scarf-wear. Friendship bracelets. Hybrid garments (sweater-jackets and jacket-sweaters). Extra-tight pants. Extra-short jackets. Gloves stuffed in breast pockets and never worn. Etc.
post #26 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

There are certain gimmicks and flourishes that mark someone as dressing like a blogger. Never wearing socks. Decorative scarf-wear. Friendship bracelets. Hybrid garments (sweater-jackets and jacket-sweaters). Extra-tight pants. Extra-short jackets. Gloves stuffed in breast pockets and never worn. Etc.
This is a reasonable list, but to be meaningful in typing bloggers, I think you have to look at the context in which these things are worn (like sweater jackets), the number of flourishes piled on top of each other, and, to a lesser degree, where the habit comes from. The latter is hard to identify but it makes the difference between looking natural and looking like you are wearing something you saw on TV (or are trying to get on the Sartorialist).
post #27 of 47
True, maybe one smell test is to ask whether such an outfit could be worn where outfits of its formality are worn. Hence, friendship bracelets are a deal-breaker. I cannot imagine wearing them stacked conspicuously on my wrist and then go to work without getting odd looks and people asking me, what's with the bracelets?
post #28 of 47
What I appreciate most about WIll is that he is just enjoying being himself and pursuing his own personal style.
post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

I like this post of his. Not new, of course.

'Just as some men find it difficult to feel relaxed in their clothes, some men feel that they should not be interested in their clothes in the first place and, like de Balzac’s ‘beast’, they just cover themselves. I suppose that they do have a kind of authority on their side, including Hardy Amies, with his dictum about choosing one’s clothes with intelligence, putting them on with care and then forgetting all about them but the trouble is that these men miss out the first two stages.

The fear seems to be for a man to seem to be interested in his own clothes. This fear is often put about and enforced by couch potatoes who ask for nothing more from life than to watch football on the television, with a twelve pack of pilsner beer, muttering, in defence of their idleness, that this is what real men do and real men do not care about clothes; real men don’t dance, and real men certainly don’t cry.

Let’s think about it in reverse order: if we accept that Sir Winston Churchill was a real man, then there is an example of a real man who often burst into tears, even on public platforms. If real men don’t dance, what was George Raft doing (and doing superbly well), with Carole Lombard, in the film Rumba?

If real men don’t care about clothes, what are Muhammad Ali and Manny Pacquiao doing dressing as they do?

Accordingly, let the couch potatoes sneer as they like. They sneer because they want to avoid full engagement in the act of living and their condemning of certain activities enables them: first, to avoid the effort involved in taking part and, secondly, to keep in their quiet corners, hoping that they won’t be asked to show the world what they can do. If they (at least occasionally) actually stood up and took part in something other than the vicarious enjoyment of the sporting achievements of others, they might understand the simple pleasure to be derived from striving to achieve something worthwhile. Dressing well is a part of that striving for achievement. Come to that, knowing how to dance (even if not as well as George Raft) is worthwhile because, when the couch potatoes are wallflowers at a ‘do’, you won’t be and, while I don’t suggest bursting into tears at a tough business meeting, if someone close to you (even a well-loved pet) suddenly dies, one misses out on a part of living in stifling natural grief with a fear of feeling.'


http://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2012/05/masculine-interest-in-dressing.html

The best post ever, keep it up my friend.
post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Makoto Chan View Post

Will's such a pleasant writer that I enjoy reading anyway. Right? He never makes me feel bad about not eating caviar or ironing my own shirts or not buying "the perfect shade of wine" necktie.

By all accounts he is a nice chap but caviar and sending shirts out to be laundered is classic iGent territory. He was on about light blue shirts the other day. Most men have those as a wardrobe staple. Not Will - but to compensate he was going to buy a whole bunch of them, so that he always had a spare in case the 'better half' sends the laundry away (for not using the tradesman's entrance?).

I know it is his business now, but he seems to have too much stuff and is always looking for more. Stuff for the week between Summer and Autumn when it is neither hot enough nor cold enough for the rest of his clothes. That sort of thing. Will's clothing concerns often seem trivial to me. Vox always posted the better photographs too.

I do not know what other interests he has, but Will seems like someone with too much time on his hands. He could be doing other things.
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