or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › LinkedIn
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

LinkedIn - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by imschatz View Post

Long story short .. nope.

Long story long .. In the 2nd meeting, we talked for about 2 hours on my career goals, and how I can get there. They are leaving the position empty, and seeing what I can do re: development in my current role over the next couple months. I've got the technical skills to be an analyst, they are worried I don't have the ability to effectively apply them to the market. I've only been in the industry for 10 months, so I can see their point .. still disappointing. Guess I gotta bust my ass for a few months and see what happens.

Honestly, sounds like a bullshit response from them. Hopefully it works out, but I've seen and heard to many stories that begin similarly, and they do not often pan out with the person getting the position. I don't see how any employer can expect someone to go from 'don't have the ability to effectively apply them to the market' to what they are after within a few months, especially if you already have 10 months of prior experience (6 months is usually enough to understand a role, 4 more would mean you should have it mastered). Obviously depending on where and what you are working on, which I know little of...

Anyway, best of luck.
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturdays View Post

Honestly, sounds like a bullshit response from them. Hopefully it works out, but I've seen and heard to many stories that begin similarly, and they do not often pan out with the person getting the position. I don't see how any employer can expect someone to go from 'don't have the ability to effectively apply them to the market' to what they are after within a few months, especially if you already have 10 months of prior experience (6 months is usually enough to understand a role, 4 more would mean you should have it mastered). Obviously depending on where and what you are working on, which I know little of...

Anyway, best of luck.
Ya .. I'm not holding out much hope. Problem is .. the job I'm doing now is borderline irrelevant to this type of role. So even 10 years experience doing what I am doing, won't count for shit. They want to find out if .. I'm an Economist, or an Engineer. My experience screams 'engineer' .. I know I'm an Economist, and I think it's possible to demonstrate that in 3-6 months.

Right city, right industry, right company .. wrong floor of the building - (I'm in operations, want to be in trading).
post #18 of 29
It might be easier to move within your company. You're coming up on ten months so that's almost one performance period. Did you mention to your manager during review period you'd be interested in a secondment to the trading department or even get your foot in through participating in a special project between both your areas so you can meet more people & let them know you're interested?

Previously, I wanted to leave my old company but my aspiration was middle management (yes, yes, yes) and found it was much easier to move to other firms at the same level than if I just wanted to move to another firm *and* a new area or position all at once.

Keep all doors open. If you got to talk to the future manager at another firm rather than just a recruiter or whoever, it might be good to put them on your call list and give them a ring every quarter letting them know what new things you've done at your current firm and feeling out what the situation is like. Coffee (or lunch or drink, don't know what kind of industry you're in) works.
post #19 of 29
I had no idea people really used linkedin.


Maybe that explains my dismal employment conditions? I had a profile but with little relevant in demand skills and buzzwords, it was pointless.
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I had no idea people really used linkedin.


Maybe that explains my dismal employment conditions? I had a profile but with little relevant in demand skills and buzzwords, it was pointless.

Ya, I think it depends where you work. My previous job/location, no one used LinkedIn. Half the people I worked with had no idea what it was. Where I am now, EVERYONE, uses it. To the point you have to be careful, or it quickly turns into your Facebook friends list.

But ya .. it's not so much about the profile, then it is about the connections. It's a great tool for keeping in contact with old colleagues. I work in an industry where people change jobs/companies at will. I'd have a real hard time keeping track of who's gone where, if it wasn't for LinkedIn.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fwiffo View Post

It might be easier to move within your company. You're coming up on ten months so that's almost one performance period. Did you mention to your manager during review period you'd be interested in a secondment to the trading department or even get your foot in through participating in a special project between both your areas so you can meet more people & let them know you're interested?

Previously, I wanted to leave my old company but my aspiration was middle management (yes, yes, yes) and found it was much easier to move to other firms at the same level than if I just wanted to move to another firm *and* a new area or position all at once.

Keep all doors open. If you got to talk to the future manager at another firm rather than just a recruiter or whoever, it might be good to put them on your call list and give them a ring every quarter letting them know what new things you've done at your current firm and feeling out what the situation is like. Coffee (or lunch or drink, don't know what kind of industry you're in) works.

Ya, an internal move would be easier. I went to the same school, same degree, as a bunch of the guys here. I have plans in the upcoming weeks to reach out to the analyst group. Got permission from my direct supervisor to do that this morning.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by imschatz View Post

Wondering if anyone has any experience being contacted through/via LinkedIn for job opportunities?

The company that contacted me doesn't have the job posted on any of the usual job boards, but the opportunity sounds legit - interview is tomorrow with the hiring manager and some upper level management (president, managing director) on Monday.

Just wondering if I how aggressive I can get with my 'list of demands' (salary, benefits, etc.) when/if they ask.

I'm pretty much a baby, only got 18 months of real work experience .. seems kinda odd to get recruited this way (at this stage in my career) - and seems really odd the President would be sitting in on the interview.

At your experience level, the really aggressive recruiters are probably trying to fill jobs that people generally don't want (insurance sales, "financial advisor," outside sales, etc.). In grad. school, I got a lot of those messages. Most of them were shxt. Some of them seemed decent.

 

For me, LinkedIn was a nice way for me to contact recruiters/managers (not the other way around). Good luck.

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I had no idea people really used linkedin.


Maybe that explains my dismal employment conditions? I had a profile but with little relevant in demand skills and buzzwords, it was pointless.

Yep...You'd probably be in play if you put a little time into it. You'd probably be surprised. I'm employed, but I've had a few interviews (and subsequent job offers) because of LinkedIn.

post #23 of 29

I had been contacted by a number of recruiters also, from a big corporations to a smaller ones to even recruitment consultants. I am actually surprised that people are actually using LinkedIn to offer employment. Put some effort into the profile, it won't hurt.

post #24 of 29
There's a job opening for an equity research associate position at a BB bank for the one and only sector I would want to cover and I just found out who the analyst for that sector is.

I found his LinkedIn profile and he only has 11 connections, so I'm guessing he's not very active on it.

Do you guys think I should network more at the associate level before reaching out directly to the analyst?

I've never, ever used LinkedIn to message people and only have it to track connections, but everyone keeps saying how monumentally useful it is for landing jobs. My manager even said the premium subscription is worth it.

Anyone have any thoughts?
post #25 of 29
I played with the subscription Idea when I was between jobs a couple of months ago. I imagine it has a lot to do with your field, and I am afraid I am not qualified to speak about your field. I use it to know who the players are, who my competitors are and to network, but I rarely use it to contact people. That being said I am hiring a new rep and I have used it to look for potential candidates whether they are seeking work or not.
post #26 of 29

I remember someone saying this is only common for someone with a IT or Sales background.

 

Now I was approached about a job opening in a private message from someone last week but that was only because I sent the person a connection request and my background was similar to where she was working.

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

There's a job opening for an equity research associate position at a BB bank for the one and only sector I would want to cover and I just found out who the analyst for that sector is.

I found his LinkedIn profile and he only has 11 connections, so I'm guessing he's not very active on it.

Do you guys think I should network more at the associate level before reaching out directly to the analyst?

I've never, ever used LinkedIn to message people and only have it to track connections, but everyone keeps saying how monumentally useful it is for landing jobs. My manager even said the premium subscription is worth it.

Anyone have any thoughts?

Overall LinkedIn is great. What I would recommend is exactly what you were thinking. Network at the associate level male some connections (see if you can get some recommendations) then contact the analyst.
I use LinkedIn daily, at my old job (marketing specialist) for a surgical company I made lots of connections that helped me expand my marketing reach.
Another key to a successful LinkedIn network is joining different groups and meeting people in the groups (lots of times if you're in the same group you share that interest).
The premium subscription is defiantly worth it.

Hope this helps, let me know if I can answer anything else.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

There's a job opening for an equity research associate position at a BB bank for the one and only sector I would want to cover and I just found out who the analyst for that sector is.

I found his LinkedIn profile and he only has 11 connections, so I'm guessing he's not very active on it.

Do you guys think I should network more at the associate level before reaching out directly to the analyst?

I've never, ever used LinkedIn to message people and only have it to track connections, but everyone keeps saying how monumentally useful it is for landing jobs. My manager even said the premium subscription is worth it.

Anyone have any thoughts?

Yes. Network with as many people as you can.
post #29 of 29

I believe Linkedin helps you get a job if you already have one

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › LinkedIn