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Isaia at Pitti Uomo 83 - Page 2

post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 
Could you explain further what you perceive to be in conflict? I don't see any tension between having your own style and not having very many clothes. It's kind of the personal uniform approach - both parts are important. It's a uniform in that you have one look that you stick to, but personal in the sense that you choose it based on your own sensibilities, circumstances, personality, etc....
post #17 of 26

Grazie, Bel Ragazzo, for an elegant and useful piece of writing.

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Could you explain further what you perceive to be in conflict? I don't see any tension between having your own style and not having very many clothes. It's kind of the personal uniform approach - both parts are important. It's a uniform in that you have one look that you stick to, but personal in the sense that you choose it based on your own sensibilities, circumstances, personality, etc....

 

The conflict is in the getting there, not in the end point.

 

In other words, how does one get to the end-point (which as you say, is logically perfectly acceptable) of having a specific personal style and a congruent, well-edited wardrobe.

 

What I mean is that in order to select items for the wardrobe, you have to know your personal style. And it's extraordinarly difficult - unless you're a style idiot savant - to absolutely know your personal style without experimenting with different looks and seeing what chimes well with it or not. Moreover, your personal style is unlikely to be entirely static, but will probably evolve (at least incrementally) as you move through life.

 

So while I fully accept that the end point is practical, I think getting there requires experimentation/iterative improvement. Which almost inevitably means periods of having a poorly-edited wardrobe (not necessarily in quantity of items; poor specificity within a small rotation would also represent poor editing).

 

I'm not sure that's any clearer, but it's as clear as I can get my disorganised thinking to be... :)

post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
Ah ok, that makes sense. Of course some trial and error must be undertaken. I dont think having had more clothes is antithetical to this sort of philosophy. Just at a given time, a few things that embody one's personal style rather than many things to be all things to all people and follow all the appropriate rules in all situations. Although this second strategy doesn't necessarily require a huge number of items, they are kind of closely proscribed.

You may argue that trial and error is expensive, while following Mantons list limits the possibility for error. And this is certainly true. But within what I understand to be Gianluca's outlook, someone following Mantons list of what it takes to be well dressed can never, in fact, be well dressed.

Being stylish in a more individualistic way may be difficult, but if I were easy, it wouldn't be so impressive and attractive when you see it.

But just to be clear, im explaining this viewpoint as I understand it. I share parts of it, but I'm also a proud owner of a solid navy suit, two navy blazers, on top of far too many clothes for any sane individual, with more in the way.
post #20 of 26
Great interview. I'm a fan of Isaia.
post #21 of 26
Thanks for this.

Fine, and wise, idea to create an interview format.
GL Isaia is very well spoken, intelligent, and represents the core values of napolitano tailoring like no other in my opinion.

Always enjoy reading his interviews and thoughts.

Everything he represents and what he appreciates regarding tailoring and style I find an absolute affinity for. He's a real mentor, and I dare say, hold him closer than Luciano Barbera, who also is an idol..

I particularly like his comments on a limited wardrobe..and it is what I have always done myself, in part because I hate excess.
I have lived here for yrs already, and spaces are not what they are in the States with the large homes, walk in closets, etc..not to mention excess.

Having too much stifles creativity Ive learned. Just as too much convenience stifles creativity.

As a fine art painter I understand why I am here. Not merely the history, but ppl are not wired into their computers, live on the internet, stuck in front of tv, etc...

....but im digressing.

Thx again
Kind regards
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by demian19003 View Post

Thanks for this.

Everything he represents and what he appreciates regarding tailoring and style I find an absolute affinity for. He's a real mentor, and I dare say, hold him closer than Luciano Barbera, who also is an idol..

Glad you enjoyed. Stay tuned, there's also an upcoming longer interview with LB himself, who I think offers an interesting contrast to GI's point of view.
post #23 of 26

Serious want on that silk/cashmere scarf, simply beautiful.

post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
If you like scarves, you'll love what's coming up as the feature for tomorrow....

post #25 of 26
I love scarves....smile.gif
post #26 of 26
I've now read this interview 3 or 4 times and it is just sublime. Every time he talks, he sounds more like the talisman for our sartorial beliefs.
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