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Artisanal imperfections: valued benefit or total turn-off?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Over time I've come to know several companies that gladly veer towards more artisanal production techniques. I've run into fabric suppliers that embrace old technologies and the imperfections that result as genuine and valuable. Or brands like Crociani that declare on their hangtags something along the lines of: "This garment is handmade; any dye or construction imperfections should be regarded as an added value..." 

I've always wondered if companies use this as an excuse to sell faulty fabric, or whether the market appreciates the imperfections that result from artisinal processes.

Personally I love imperfections. I feel that they do indeed add value to the garment in that it becomes a truly unique item that only I have, with a little bit more spirit or "raison d'etre". As long as the garment is sewn with care and shows a good construction quality.

What do you guys think?


Edited by Miekka - 1/30/13 at 3:42am
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 

Seriously! Nobody has anything to say about this?
 

post #3 of 7

nope.

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miekka View Post

Over time I've come to know several companies that gladly veer towards more artisanal production techniques. I've run into fabric suppliers that embrace old technologies and the imperfections that result as genuine and valuable. Or brands like Crociani that declare on their hangtags something along the lines of: "This garment is handmade; any dye or construction imperfections should be regarded as an added value..." 
I've always wondered if companies use this as an excuse to sell faulty fabric, or whether the market appreciates the imperfections that result from artisinal processes.
Personally I love imperfections. I feel that they do indeed add value to the garment in that it becomes a truly unique item that only I have, with a little bit more spirit or "raison d'etre". As long as the garment is sewn with care and shows a good construction quality.
What do you guys think?

As long as the imperfection is not unsightly, fine.

But if I'm spending $200 US on a tie, I want the dots/pattern/stripes/neats/what-have-you to end perfectly at the tip. Not off to one side. If that requires a bit more fabric, so be it.
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlaneurNYC View Post


As long as the imperfection is not unsightly, fine.

But if I'm spending $200 US on a tie, I want the dots/pattern/stripes/neats/what-have-you to end perfectly at the tip. Not off to one side. If that requires a bit more fabric, so be it.

 

Agreed; but I would consider that a construction issue. Especially in an artisinal context construction defects are unacceptable in my opinion.

I was refering more to companies that use particular fabric surfaces, dyeing techniques/washes (intentionally or not) and justify them as unique. For example, have you ever bought a tie with an uneven surface or an uneven color because you found that it added value to the aesthetic?

post #6 of 7
Imperfections such as you find on raw silks and other textural fabrics, sure. I don't mind seeing the "hand" in things, either. As long as they don't appear to be mistakes.

I wouldn't want to buy a grenadine tie with a missed thread in the weaving, though. Or if some of the dye didn't take well. I'd hope the luxury maker would avoid such imperfections in their materials. If something slips by the cutters and sewers, then it should be pulled out as a second by those inspecting the goods.
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlaneurNYC View Post

Imperfections such as you find on raw silks and other textural fabrics, sure. I don't mind seeing the "hand" in things, either. As long as they don't appear to be mistakes.

I wouldn't want to buy a grenadine tie with a missed thread in the weaving, though. Or if some of the dye didn't take well. I'd hope the luxury maker would avoid such imperfections in their materials. If something slips by the cutters and sewers, then it should be pulled out as a second by those inspecting the goods.

Exactly. If the item has "character" because of its construction, it is a lot different than if the craftsmen just missed a few stitches or punted on the patina. Buying a grenadine tie is much different than getting a pair of antiqued shoes, which should have a bit of variation between them. I view it much like buying wood...you seek out the wood that has the most unique shape to it, the one with the knot, because it seems organic.
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