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Kamakura Shirts - Madison Ave Store - Page 93

post #1381 of 1606
Can the arms be tailored to be made longer on these?
post #1382 of 1606
No. There's no extra fabric to be let out on shirts, generally....
post #1383 of 1606
Didn't think so. Was holding on to my one scrap of hope. Damnit
post #1384 of 1606
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

Anyone give these a try?

http://www.kamakurashirts.net/shop/g/gWF104510S/#

Please share thoughts on fit and shrink after wash.

 

I don't have that shirt, but I do have the Vintage Ivy Indigo Chambray one which has a similar description where it says it has been washed to have a unique texture and also mentions the 2% shrinkage. I haven't noticed any substantial shrinkage and I'm sure my wife has even washed it in hot!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lexxdeleon View Post
 

Missed out on the grab bag, oh well, its probably for the best.

 

I only have one of Kamakura's shirts, a tokyo slim fit, and it doesn't have a split yoke. Are all their shirts single yoke? I was a bit surprised when I received mine and saw this.

 

I don't think I've seen any split yoke shirts from Kamakura. I just did a custom shirt order from Spier & MacKay and in fact asked that the make my shirts with a single yoke, instead of the split which is their default. I just prefer the single personally. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fieldofdreams View Post
 

What are every ones opinions of the soft unfused collars on Kamakuras shirts?  I'm speaking specifically to their spread collar.   Someone commented that my collars look messy, like the fusing is old, on the what are you wearing today board. The collars are just unfused and I don't use collar stays.  I know this is the look most prefer with cutaways.  How does everyone feel about it with spread collars?

 

All my non-BD Kamakura shirts are the spread collar (what they call "wide", not the cutaway). Are you saying that you have unfused collars that people have called messy, or fused? The Kamakura unfused collars are a bit of a hassle to iron, as it takes some skill in order to prevent ironing in any folds. I find mine look perfectly smooth once I've ironed them properly and insert the collar stays. Without collar stays they'd still be fine, but more floppy probably. I wear my fused collar dress shirts without collar stays as I prefer the slightly softer look. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ptr1988 View Post
 

I am looking to purchase Kamakura tokyo slim fit dress shirt for my suits, whats the differences between - dobby / end-on-end / and broadcloth. Which is better to be worn with a suit and without a suit? Thanks

 

Broadcloth would be the most plain and formal. Hover over the image of this shirt and notice how you cannot see any texture whatsoever. End-on-end is a type of broadcloth (of so I've heard it described). When a coloured shirt (for example blue) is in End-on-End, you'll see some threads that are white in the mix. The surface is still very smooth, but there's some added visual interest. Look at this one as an example. Finally dobby is a fabric made on a special loom which allows the threads to be woven in different patterns. It can be used to create a patterned shirt, such as with stripes, like this one, or it can create a solid coloured shirt that has a textural pattern, like this (click the photo with the close up of the collar), or like this, or any number of textural variations. 

 

Again, a simple, plain broadcloth is the most standard and formal, and a safe bet for your first shirt, especially with suits. However, it's really just a matter of personally preference. Any of them would be fine. The textured ones may be a better choice for non-suit outfits. Certainly something like a heavier Oxford Cloth is much better for casual wear.

post #1385 of 1606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spex View Post
 

 

I don't have that shirt, but I do have the Vintage Ivy Indigo Chambray one which has a similar description where it says it has been washed to have a unique texture and also mentions the 2% shrinkage. I haven't noticed any substantial shrinkage and I'm sure my wife has even washed it in hot!

 

 

I don't think I've seen any split yoke shirts from Kamakura. I just did a custom shirt order from Spier & MacKay and in fact asked that the make my shirts with a single yoke, instead of the split which is their default. I just prefer the single personally. 

 

 

All my non-BD Kamakura shirts are the spread collar (what they call "wide", not the cutaway). Are you saying that you have unfused collars that people have called messy, or fused? The Kamakura unfused collars are a bit of a hassle to iron, as it takes some skill in order to prevent ironing in any folds. I find mine look perfectly smooth once I've ironed them properly and insert the collar stays. Without collar stays they'd still be fine, but more floppy probably. I wear my fused collar dress shirts without collar stays as I prefer the slightly softer look. 

 

 

Broadcloth would be the most plain and formal. Hover over the image of this shirt and notice how you cannot see any texture whatsoever. End-on-end is a type of broadcloth (of so I've heard it described). When a coloured shirt (for example blue) is in End-on-End, you'll see some threads that are white in the mix. The surface is still very smooth, but there's some added visual interest. Look at this one as an example. Finally dobby is a fabric made on a special loom which allows the threads to be woven in different patterns. It can be used to create a patterned shirt, such as with stripes, like this one, or it can create a solid coloured shirt that has a textural pattern, like this (click the photo with the close up of the collar), or like this, or any number of textural variations. 

 

Again, a simple, plain broadcloth is the most standard and formal, and a safe bet for your first shirt, especially with suits. However, it's really just a matter of personally preference. Any of them would be fine. The textured ones may be a better choice for non-suit outfits. Certainly something like a heavier Oxford Cloth is much better for casual wear.

 

Thank you, so the textured ones like you mentioned (heavier Oxford Cloth example) can be worn with a blazer or so for casual wear?

post #1386 of 1606
Quote:
Originally Posted by ptr1988 View Post
 

 

Thank you, so the textured ones like you mentioned (heavier Oxford Cloth example) can be worn with a blazer or so for casual wear?

 

The heavier the cloth, the more casual. The way to tell is from the numbers listed like this:

 

番手 : 80/2×40/4

 

This 80/2 x 40/4 is from the Oxford Cloth shirt I linked to. It would be fine with a textured sportcoat, but perhaps a bit too casual for a worsted wool suit.

 

Not all textured (eg dobby) fabrics will be as casual in appearance. For example, one of the dobby shirts I linked to shows that it's a 100:

 

番手 :

100番手双糸

When you start to get into 100 and above, the material is more refined and light. Hence, it comes off as more formal. Although textured, these are fine to be worn with a smooth wool suit. 

 

For me a buttondown collar is more casual, and not always meant to be worn with a tie (although the Japanese, like many Americas, don't follow this rule). Spread collar shirts are basically meant to be worn with a tie. So a combination of fabric texture, pattern, weight, collar style, whether you wear it with a tie or not... these are all factors that can be taken into account when deciding how casual or formal a shirt is to you, and how you will wear it (with a suit, sportcoat or no jacket at all). Cheers.

post #1387 of 1606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spex View Post

I don't have that shirt, but I do have the Vintage Ivy Indigo Chambray one which has a similar description where it says it has been washed to have a unique texture and also mentions the 2% shrinkage. I haven't noticed any substantial shrinkage and I'm sure my wife has even washed it in hot!


I don't think I've seen any split yoke shirts from Kamakura. I just did a custom shirt order from Spier & MacKay and in fact asked that the make my shirts with a single yoke, instead of the split which is their default. I just prefer the single personally. 


All my non-BD Kamakura shirts are the spread collar (what they call "wide", not the cutaway). Are you saying that you have unfused collars that people have called messy, or fused? The Kamakura unfused collars are a bit of a hassle to iron, as it takes some skill in order to prevent ironing in any folds. I find mine look perfectly smooth once I've ironed them properly and insert the collar stays. Without collar stays they'd still be fine, but more floppy probably. I wear my fused collar dress shirts without collar stays as I prefer the slightly softer look. 


Broadcloth would be the most plain and formal. Hover over the image of this shirt and notice how you cannot see any texture whatsoever. End-on-end is a type of broadcloth (of so I've heard it described). When a coloured shirt (for example blue) is in End-on-End, you'll see some threads that are white in the mix. The surface is still very smooth, but there's some added visual interest. Look at this one as an example. Finally dobby is a fabric made on a special loom which allows the threads to be woven in different patterns. It can be used to create a patterned shirt, such as with stripes, like this one, or it can create a solid coloured shirt that has a textural pattern, like this (click the photo with the close up of the collar), or like this, or any number of textural variations. 

Again, a simple, plain broadcloth is the most standard and formal, and a safe bet for your first shirt, especially with suits. However, it's really just a matter of personally preference. Any of them would be fine. The textured ones may be a better choice for non-suit outfits. Certainly something like a heavier Oxford Cloth is much better for casual wear.

Thanks, still on the fence. Anyone have something comparable for a casual white OCBD? The CASUAL134 line seems to have a flatter collar roll. I like the 3-D look of the dress shirt collars.

I will be ordering a OCBD white shirt in the Tokyo Slim Fit, but it's too long to wear with the hem not tucked.
post #1388 of 1606

I don't know who else noticed, but they added some Thomas Mason cloth shirts for $130.  Pretty decent price and a couple cool fabrics.  Nothing that really got me excited though.

post #1389 of 1606

I find Brooks Brothers OCBDs aren't as long. Also try Spier & MacKay. 

post #1390 of 1606
Hi guys,
I'm in Tokyo for the next 2 days. Dropped into a Maker's Shirt (Kamakura) shop in Akihabara today. I need the 39 neck but they only had the Japanese cuts in store which have a 87 sleeve but I need a 89/90 sleeve (which the NY slim cut can provide).

Does anyone know if any of the Tokyo stores have the NY cuts?
post #1391 of 1606
Quote:
Originally Posted by BananaKing View Post

Hi guys,
I'm in Tokyo for the next 2 days. Dropped into a Maker's Shirt (Kamakura) shop in Akihabara today. I need the 39 neck but they only had the Japanese cuts in store which have a 87 sleeve but I need a 89/90 sleeve (which the NY slim cut can provide).

Does anyone know if any of the Tokyo stores have the NY cuts?

 

I'm pretty sure that their shop in Haneda airport in Tokyo has some NY cut shirts but, of course, if you're not flying out of Haneda then that's not very useful to you. 

 

I'm not sure if any of the other stores in Tokyo would stock NY cut shirts. Here's a list of their Tokyo stores: 

 

http://www.shirt.co.jp/shop/en_ny.php#shoparea2

 

The Shinjuku store looks as though it has quite a large range of products, so if you're dropping by Shinjuku (to go to the Isetan men's annex, for example), you could have a look in the Shinjuku store. 

post #1392 of 1606
Thanks again JM, love your work
post #1393 of 1606
I went to a number of locations in Tokyo during the summer and none of them had NY size shirts, except for the one at Heneda Airport. The other stores each told me to check Haneda, so I suspect that it might be the only one. Thy did have them, but the selection was pretty sparse. Kamakura stores are generally very small. I suspect the NY sizes were developed specifically for the NY store. Best to order online and have them shipped to someone in Japan. Better selection that way.
post #1394 of 1606

Bought a fukubukuro bag. Fairly pleased with my selection. But then, I'm still assembling my first wardrobe. 

post #1395 of 1606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colrais View Post

Bought a fukubukuro bag. Fairly pleased with my selection. But then, I'm still assembling my first wardrobe. 

What did you get?
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