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Importance of keeping resume to 1 page...your thoughts? - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by wj4 View Post

You talk about your interests? Can you elaborate on this part? Thanks.

I put, among other things, "Fine English Shoes" as one of my interests. Then I got asked which maker was my favorite on the second interview (the right answer was C&J).

28, got the job, very happy!

YMMV
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by imschatz View Post


Most hiring managers (not HR, but the person you will actually work for) want to know you are an interesting person, and a good person to work with. Most of my interviews have spent as much time talking about my interests as my qualifications.

Volunteer work, sports, activities, etc. A few lines, nothing more .. just enough to spark some conversation during an interview.

 

Definitely good to have an interests and activities section on your resume, especially if you're just starting out and the company places an emphasis on fit. I actually just got an interview because the recruiter thinks my profile is interesting. You still have to be qualified, but it'll make you look more appealing than the guy who spent all of college in the library.

post #18 of 27
threak is tl;dr, but it also depends on where you are applying. taleo filters most and the hiring managers then sort. 2 pages is ideal.
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post

threak is tl;dr, but it also depends on where you are applying. taleo filters most and the hiring managers then sort. 2 pages is ideal.
I don't understand the lingo on the first portion of threak is tl;dr foo.gif
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by wj4 View Post

I don't understand the lingo on the first portion of threak is tl;dr foo.gif

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=tl%3Bdr
post #21 of 27
Unless you're either an academic or a veteran with 2 decades of experience under your belt, keep it to one page. It can be done.

Kill the fluff, synthesize macro ideas and key words in a crisp way, kill the stupid hobbies and extraneous crapola, and play with the formatting. If you must, kill the Summary section.

Don't make line items too long or overstuffed. Don't make it a job description :I did x y z" - include accomplishments, awards, metrics, insight into highly specific skills.

And whatever you do, don't include an "Objective" section, which is the mark of an amateur or recent grad, and don't say "References available upon request" I know that already.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daisy View Post

Don't sweat it. I would recommend two pages, certainly no more, unless you are fresh out of college. 

Also, don't send resumes to HR, they don't read them, ever, anyway. Have coffee and lunch with friends and colleagues, do favors, help each other out, that way you'll hear about jobs before they get posted (when 500 other people will send in resumes)

You are a salesman. Your resume is your brochure. If you are just sending it around hoping someone will buy, you're doing it wrong. You need to set up meetings and help people. The resume is just a leave-behind. 

If you want a new job, see this white paper, entitled Everything You Know About Job Hunting is Wrong, Here's How You Really Do It" at www.darkmatterconsulting.com/jobhunting


Dave

Aside from the fact that your post is spam, it's terrible advice. Reaching out to companies and directly sending them your resume has landed plenty of people jobs.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post


Aside from the fact that your post is spam, it's terrible advice. Reaching out to companies and directly sending them your resume has landed plenty of people jobs.

When you say "has landed plenty of people jobs," is that data? Could you name these people if you wanted to? If yes, awesome, you've got a point. If not, your opinion may be out of date. I volunteer at a job transition center, and we tell people not to bother "applying" for jobs or (e-)mailing resumes to HR, it's a waste of time. I have worked with dozens of job-seekers (whose names I can produce), and most got their jobs from networking, a few from headhunters, and no one from sending a resume cold or applying to something online. Now, reaching out to specific people is very helpful, in particular if you have some sort of a connection, and the resume can help, but leading with the resume rarely pays off. 

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daisy View Post

When you say "has landed plenty of people jobs," is that data? Could you name these people if you wanted to? If yes, awesome, you've got a point. If not, your opinion may be out of date. I volunteer at a job transition center, and we tell people not to bother "applying" for jobs or (e-)mailing resumes to HR, it's a waste of time. I have worked with dozens of job-seekers (whose names I can produce), and most got their jobs from networking, a few from headhunters, and no one from sending a resume cold or applying to something online. Now, r
eaching out to specific people is very helpful, in particular if you have some sort of a connection, and the resume can help, but leading with the resume rarely pays off. 
I got my recent job (started 10 months ago) by applying online. I do work in a city/industry where unemployment is ~0% .. but ya. To say it's a waste of time is inaccurate. I'd say the $40k or so raise I got from this job was definitely not a waste of time.
post #25 of 27

Resumes need to be one full page, well organized, and well edited. You should never use a generic resume. Always mold your resume to the job you are applying for, steal keywords from the job posting, and make it look very professional. It will pay to invest some time and even money into making your resume. You are trying to sell yourself, you need your resume to make the person reading it say, "I want to talk to this person."

post #26 of 27

I keep my resume to 2 pages but i make sure that the second page only needs to be read if the first page has sufficiently interested the reader.

If I'm e-mailing a resume, I always send it as a PDF as opposed to a Word Document.

post #27 of 27

1pg is the general expectation, and people are lazy, so they don't want to do more work than what's expected. A lot of recruiters and managers don't even like to fully read 1 page resumes. They look for certain things, and they move on, so if you've got two (or more) pages, then you've just written more words that no one will read. Most people don't have NEARLY enough relevant information to justify more than one page. Just keep it to one.

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