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Foo shops for a Japanese knife - Page 20

post #286 of 291
Curious if any of you guys have experience with Hontanren chef knives? They are blue steel, sandwiched between iron, I don't have personal experience with blue stool in tools, but it comes highly regarded among hand-tool woodworkers. Some of my resources in woodworking have interest in Japanese knives and recommended that a good knife to them would have been hammered at a low temperature to ensure toughness in the edge, but they generally do not buy in this range of cost so they had no specific recommendations.

Hontanren looks like it is finished well and made in the tradition style without much concern for western appeal, which is inherently appealing to me.
post #287 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I don't have personal experience with blue stool.
Sounds like an intestinal issue ...

I've never used blue steel either, although I see these chisels in the Japan Woodworker catalog when it comes in the mail and I've always been curious:
http://www.japanwoodworker.com/category/12762/blue-steel-bench-chisels.aspx
http://www.japanwoodworker.com/category/12775/blue-steel-cabinet-chisels.aspx
I have a decent set of Lie-Nielsens so I've never taken the plunge and tried them though. Garrett Hack did a video on Japanese chisels a few years back:
http://www.finewoodworking.com/tool-guide/video/understanding-japanese-chisels.aspx
He makes a point that because they are much harder on the Rockwell scale, they aren't as good for chopping and are better for paring. Not sure exactly how that would correlate to a kitchen knife, but maybe they would be more prone to chip if you hit a chicken bone or something.

On a related note, I hadn't done any knife maintenance for a while so I took my Hattori FH gyuto and Togiharu sujihiki through my glass stone cycle yesterday. I know not a lot of people use them for knives, but I already had them from woodworking and think they actually work pretty great on knives. I do 220, 1000, 4000, and 8000. The last one may be a bit of overkill but it does put a nice mirror edge on it. I can't imagine going to 16000 would accomplish anything.

EDIT: sorry had the wrong link for the Garrett Hack video. Fixed now.
Edited by Fred G. Unn - 5/25/14 at 10:42am
post #288 of 291

I've heard better things about white steel compared to blue steel when used for kitchen knives.

 

This fella makes nice knives in the US:

 

 

post #289 of 291
Thanks gents!

Fred, I use both blue spruce and lie Nielsen for woodworking. My dislike of Japanese saws has kept me in western style chisels as well, even though that might be an unfair bias.

I have 400 and 800 in diamond stones and 1000 and 6000 in whetstones, so far it works well for knives and ww tools.

I have nothing to truly complain about with my western knives, just want to scratch the itch so to speak
post #290 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

My dislike of Japanese saws has kept me in western style chisels as well, even though that might be an unfair bias.

I mostly use Western too. (Wenzloff and vintage Diston) I have a folding dozuki that has no kerf so it's good for flush cutting. I also have another dozuki that I now hate. Last fall I was cutting some wainscotting to fit around our windows when we redid our kitchen and for whatever reason I grabbed the dozuki. I wasn't as familiar with how fast it cut, not used to cutting on the pull stroke, it was late and I probably wasn't careful enough, and I ended up nicking my knuckle. Had to go to the ER for stitches at 1am, ugh!
Edited by Fred G. Unn - 5/25/14 at 11:37am
post #291 of 291
Ouch! Pretty bad nick.

My last Japanese saw is a flush cut from mitsukawa. All others had tragic endings.

How do you like your Wenzloff's? I have all lie Nielsen saws and no complaints but mike's saws look incredibly tempting.
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