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Foo shops for a Japanese knife - Page 15

post #211 of 291
http://thebestthings.com/knives/sabatier_nogent.htm

Prices are much higher than what you paid, but still reasonable. I have also read reports that some of the edges sharpening can be spotty, but mine we all pretty good. I am tempted, for no reason, to get a 12" and maybe also a 4" paring knife, but I really have no need.
post #212 of 291
check out this guy's store. amazing stuff.
post #213 of 291
Are you getting one of the cleavers?
post #214 of 291

This guy makes really high quality cutlery, would love to own one of his pieces: http://www.cartercutlery.com/

 

Sign up to his mailing list for discounts in the welcome campaign, and check out his YT videos, there are some showing how he makes the knives.

 

I think my next purchase is going to be a Deba, I need a beater knife that isn't likely to chip.

post #215 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Are you getting one of the cleavers?
i've got 2 cleavers and that demi-hachette now. haven't used any of them in at least 3 years. cool objects though.
post #216 of 291
I want a kitchen axe.
post #217 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I want a kitchen axe.
I imagine the two-handed ones take some practice to swing without hurting yourself. But when you get good, you will look like this:
post #218 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I want a kitchen axe.
what does one do with it that can't be done by what you already have?
post #219 of 291
having perfected the perfectly cubed brunoise, matt is now moving on to hacked bits.
post #220 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

what does one do with it that can't be done by what you already have?
Since you asked . . . a kitchen axe is better suited for off-the-block aerial cuts.

post #221 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

what does one do with it that can't be done by what you already have?

I feel that the cleaver doesn't quite fit my image.
post #222 of 291
I think that is taken care of by the bone saw and the rib-spreaders.
post #223 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Since you asked . . . a kitchen axe is better suited for off-the-block aerial cuts.

reminds me of the Tosh.O cold steel blade demonstration (at the office). Too much corporate internet blockage going on, so I can view it and be happy.
post #224 of 291

After watching this video I'm tempted to get the 240mm Gyuto in this series, $280 ish bucks seems pretty good, and I don't have anything else in that size range yet.

 

post #225 of 291

Foo,

 

It's best to start with Tojiro 8" chef's knife and cheap King combination whetstones at 200/1000 at 1000/2000 grit.  Stay with Japanese; much better made than anything.

 

A lot of those other higher end artisan knives are alluring but you *will* destroy them *with* "proper care".  It's much harder to upkeep knives than suits or shoes.

 

And if you are going for the OneKnife, than its definitely a Chinese Cleaver, specifically Sugimoto #7.  Most versatile blade out there.

 

p.s., size of the knife has nothing to do with size of hands but dependent on work surface and the amount and type of food you need to process.  Itzhak Perlman doesn't put a cello on his shoulder so Andre the giant don't need a 20" gyuto.  Paring knives are not needed unless you are into carving small decorative items; hold gyuto/chef's knives at their back and you essentially have a paring knife.

p.s.s., I have Takeda 8" gyuto and a Takeda 8" Chinese Cleaver.  Cleaver is so much easier to process food.  If anything, I will probably get a CCK or 18Z thick cleaver to decapitate chicken and bones.

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