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Foo shops for a Japanese knife - Page 14

post #196 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Found an old crate and barrel gift card and needed a new paring knife (my good one is too long and my short one sucks) so I though I would see what they had.

Did not like the shun at all. The blade felt oddly proportioned and the asymmetrical handle didn't make sense on a paring knife that you might hold in different ways.

Had originally planned to grab the wusthof classic 3.5inch since it's a pretty good knife (and my parents had one, so it is basically exactly what pops into my mind when I think paring knife). Ended up liking the handle on the wusthof ikon a lot better even though it looks a little funny. It also benefits from not having the full bolster so sharpening should be easier.

While I was there, I tried the ikon chef's knife and thought it was nice...I still need to find somewhere around here where I can play with some of the japanese knives, but I wouldn't mind owning the ikon.

I grabbed an 8 inch Ikon a week or so ago and I'm very pleased with it. Probably grab the pairing knife eventually, too. The handle is perfect on this thing.
post #197 of 291
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post #198 of 291
I've decided to keep the Tojiros (240mm Gyuto, small paring knife). In the end, I even preferred the "paring knife", or whatever it's called -- the shape is a little funky with a straight blade --, which costs the same as MAC Pro's.
post #199 of 291
My brother who was a chef turned me onto my frist shun. Im getting married and need to step up our knife game.
What would you guys suggest for a 5 night a week cook, who doesnt do much fancy fish slicing?
I would love suggestions for a 3 knife set to keep me in good shape for the next 20 years.
Thank you knife bros
post #200 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by eglbc View Post

My brother who was a chef turned me onto my frist shun. Im getting married and need to step up our knife game.
What would you guys suggest for a 5 night a week cook, who doesnt do much fancy fish slicing?
I would love suggestions for a 3 knife set to keep me in good shape for the next 20 years. Mid range price. Workhorse.
Thank you knife bros
post #201 of 291

Purchased this knife around this time last year. 7" Haruyuki Gyuto. Holds it's edge well (despite getting treated like shit by my flatmates who used it on a slate and glass chopping board), super thin, easy to sharpen and looks pretty good.

 

 

post #202 of 291

Beautiful.

post #203 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by eglbc View Post

My brother who was a chef turned me onto my frist shun. Im getting married and need to step up our knife game.
What would you guys suggest for a 5 night a week cook, who doesnt do much fancy fish slicing?
I would love suggestions for a 3 knife set to keep me in good shape for the next 20 years.
Thank you knife bros

Go someplace where you can handle the knives--the feel of the knives, the way they fit your hand, is just as important as anything else. Any of the normal high end brands will do just fine if you take good care of them--Wusthof, Shun, etc.

In terms of types of knives, a chef's knife and a paring knife will take care of 99% of tasks. Perhaps throw in a bread knife, though there is no reason that needs to be a high end knife--I have a Victorionox bread knife that works great.
post #204 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe View Post

The old Sabatier carbon steel knives are amazing, if a pain to maintain.

Foo, buy a knife that feels good in your hand and is easy to maintain. The best knife, if poorly maintained, is no better than cheap junk. If you can get past the OneKinife to a second or third piece, I recommend a Paring knife and a 5" or so utility knife. I have a Kikuichi Gold utility knife that stays razor sharp.

Holy cow!! I can't believe I missed this thread, though it was disappointing for a foo threak.
I bought the Sabatier deadstock carbon steel knives (chef and parer) and have been enjoying them. I am sure I am under-skilled to use them, but they work well, which is all I can hope for.

Attempts to keep them pristine long-ago failed and they are now black as matt's heart. Less to worry about.
post #205 of 291
These guys make amazing knives.

I have one. Love it.


Wait list is months, but worth it:


http://www.caribooblades.com/shop1.html
post #206 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post


Holy cow!! I can't believe I missed this thread, though it was disappointing for a foo threak.
I bought the Sabatier deadstock carbon steel knives (chef and parer) and have been enjoying them. I am sure I am under-skilled to use them, but they work well, which is all I can hope for.

Attempts to keep them pristine long-ago failed and they are now black as matt's heart. Less to worry about.


I've got a carbon steel Nakiri which I've been using a lot lately. Gets dirty quick but nothing a clean can't handle. I just make sure none of my flatmates use it otherwise it'll get completely trashed in a couple days.

 

I highly recommend anyone in the UK purchase from these guys: http://cuttingedgeknives.co.uk

 

Good range of stock and they're great at responding to messages via email or social media.

post #207 of 291
My chef's knife is actually in pretty good shape since I am the only one who uses it and I ma pretty careful to dry it constantly while using it. My wife has used the paring knife and she has let it stay wet and rust. It doesn't seem to affect anything other than the appearance, though. I can no longer remember the website that was selling these but if anyone is interested in them, it is worth a look. They are reasonably priced and quite beautiful in an old-fashioned lo-tech way; definitely nothing like the fancy Asian knives people are looking at.
post #208 of 291
I'm working at home and had a couple of minutes, so I pulled out some of my carbon steel knives. The top one is Japanese, the others are deadstock Sabatier. from before WWII. The one with the pale wooden handle is from before WWI. The handle is hand-carved and the rivets are hand-hammered. Most of them need some cleaning because I don't use them that often (don't think I've ever used that demi-hachette at the bottom, but it's very cool).
post #209 of 291
3rd, 4th and 6th from the top look like the nogents that I have, though in slightly different sizes (I have a smaller paring knife (3"), a 10" chef and a 13" slicer.
post #210 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

3rd, 4th and 6th from the top look like the nogents that I have, though in slightly different sizes (I have a smaller paring knife (3"), a 10" chef and a 13" slicer.
Where did you get yours? Mine came from lee valley tools many years ago. One of their buyers found a trove when a couple of the sabatier companies were reorganizing. I don't think any of those cost more than $40.
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