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Foo shops for a Japanese knife - Page 9

post #121 of 291
What would we then consider the wet farts adorning the sides of Kramer's expensive knives?
post #122 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

What would we then consider the wet farts adorning the sides of Kramer's expensive knives?
i think they're just for purties -- the blade equivalent of fake buttonholes
post #123 of 291
i love how fg frequently offers an alternative translation to the technical talk, but translates it in terms of men's clothing to fit the vernacular of the forvm.
post #124 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

i love how fg frequently offers an alternative translation to the technical talk, but translates it in terms of men's clothing to fit the vernacular of the forvm.

That makes one an excellent communicator.
post #125 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

What would we then consider the wet farts adorning the sides of Kramer's expensive knives?

The metal can still be folded over on itself - and probably any Japanese knife worth anything is forged that way whether you can see the folds or not.

Forgive me if this was a rhetorical question, Matt, because you most likely already know the ins-and-outs of the metallurgical component of these knives anyway.
post #126 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

i love how fg frequently offers an alternative translation to the technical talk, but translates it in terms of men's clothing to fit the vernacular of the forvm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

That makes one an excellent communicator.

wha, huh?
post #127 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

The metal can still be folded over on itself - and probably any Japanese knife worth anything is forged that way whether you can see the folds or not.

Forgive me if this was a rhetorical question, Matt, because you most likely already know the ins-and-outs of the metallurgical component of these knives anyway.

Thanks. I actually know nothing about it. I don't science. So, what was damascus originally, if you don't mind explaining.
post #128 of 291
originally, damascus steel was made by folding together different types of steel in order to get both hardness for endurance and softness for the best sharpening. kind of like a laminated dough (there! I did it again!). icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #129 of 291
If you're a real man, you need a knife made from artillery shells.
post #130 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

Yeah, the fake is just etching on the surface. The real Damascus is intrinsic.


There are, one might say, three kinds of 'Damascus': There's the real damascus, which is actually a lost thing, like Greek fire. I think there was a good article on this in Scientific American about ten years ago. Then there is 'pattern-welded' steel, which is what most people call real damascus today -- where multiple types of steel (sometimes other elements are laminated in, too, like nickel; which I think Jot Singh Khalsa may have started) are placed atop each other, heated and folded and heated and folded while hammering them together -- this is called forge-welding.  Then there's really fake damascus, which is merely steel impressed with patterns that may sometimes be treated or painted to enhance.

 

True pattern-welded steel will not fade per se, if made of carbon steel, it may patina like everything else. Some steels may be acid-eteched to bring out some of the contrasts, but this is not to common in culinary steels.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

it's my understanding (perhaps faulty), that real damascus is mainly a thing of legend. i don't think it's actually produced anymore -- or has been for a couple of hundred years.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

What would we then consider the wet farts adorning the sides of Kramer's expensive knives?

It's pattern-welded. For a minute I was offended, thinking that you were calling very beautiful wood a wet fart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

originally, damascus steel was made by folding together different types of steel in order to get both hardness for endurance and softness for the best sharpening. kind of like a laminated dough (there! I did it again!). icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

 

Yes, this is mille feuille in the steel world. Though, I don;t think if everyone is really certain it was made by folding in the beginning.

 

~ H

post #131 of 291
My opinion is that the origin of Damascus steel is along the lines of how the Japanese sword makers blended a variety of steels together to create a worthwhile steel. Blending very hard tool steels with softer steels likely allowed them to create a worthwhile, resilient blade that held and edge. The process probably fell by the wayside as better and more consistent refining techniques became available.
post #132 of 291
post #133 of 291
That looks nice, can you send it to NJ for testing?
post #134 of 291
Noyce! Did you go with the 210?

Edit: Oh shit, there was a price increase? Website is showing $200 now.
Edited by shibbel - 2/2/13 at 5:35pm
post #135 of 291
210. Was $180 in store.
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