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Foo shops for a Japanese knife - Page 8

post #106 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

Which Shun are you using?
I still use the little parer, but I also have a 10" Shun Elite chef's which I no longer use.

I also have a bird's beak that I use for turning. Those are the only three Shuns I have ever owned.
post #107 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I still use the little parer, but I also have a 10" Shun Elite chef's which I no longer use.

I also have a bird's beak that I use for turning. Those are the only three Shuns I have ever owned.

Gotcha.

I've got a Shun Classic 8" chef's that I quite like. Certainly not as artisanal as many of the knives being discussed here, but it's always treated me quite well.
post #108 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by pscolari View Post

My rec would be the Misono UX 10. I loved this in person but couldn't justify the price.
that's the one i loved most too. bought it. with my own money. yes, i have a knife problem. (maybe not quite as bad as matt's; we'll have to do a knife-off). Honestly, i do about 98% of my cutting with two knives, but I probably have 20-25 in my blocks (yes, plural). many years ago a woodworking website had a sale on this huge trove of old sabatiers they found in Thiers. amazing stuff -- some pre-wwi. hand-hammered rivets and all. and the prices were ridiculous, like $50 for the most expensive. I still remember the day those packages arrived. one was a demi-hachette that was like a cross between a chef's knife and a cleaver. all of them were carbon, so they do take some care, but it's amazing how quickly they come to razor-sharp.
post #109 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

that's the one i loved most too. bought it. with my own money. yes, i have a knife problem. (maybe not quite as bad as matt's; we'll have to do a knife-off). Honestly, i do about 98% of my cutting with two knives, but I probably have 20-25 in my blocks (yes, plural). many years ago a woodworking website had a sale on this huge trove of old sabatiers they found in Thiers. amazing stuff -- some pre-wwi. hand-hammered rivets and all. and the prices were ridiculous, like $50 for the most expensive. I still remember the day those packages arrived. one was a demi-hachette that was like a cross between a chef's knife and a cleaver. all of them were carbon, so they do take some care, but it's amazing how quickly they come to razor-sharp.

Now that is really cool.

Like you, I rarely use anything but my chef's and occasionally my paring. Even less often, bread knife and filet knife.
post #110 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

that's the one i loved most too. bought it. with my own money. yes, i have a knife problem. (maybe not quite as bad as matt's; we'll have to do a knife-off). Honestly, i do about 98% of my cutting with two knives, but I probably have 20-25 in my blocks (yes, plural). many years ago a woodworking website had a sale on this huge trove of old sabatiers they found in Thiers. amazing stuff -- some pre-wwi. hand-hammered rivets and all. and the prices were ridiculous, like $50 for the most expensive. I still remember the day those packages arrived. one was a demi-hachette that was like a cross between a chef's knife and a cleaver. all of them were carbon, so they do take some care, but it's amazing how quickly they come to razor-sharp.

Really cool. I would love to see some pics of these.
post #111 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by pscolari View Post

Really cool. I would love to see some pics of these.
Kind of "what are you slicing now"?
i'll try to get some snaps this weekend.
post #112 of 291
WAYSRN
post #113 of 291
The old Sabatier carbon steel knives are amazing, if a pain to maintain.

Foo, buy a knife that feels good in your hand and is easy to maintain. The best knife, if poorly maintained, is no better than cheap junk. If you can get past the OneKinife to a second or third piece, I recommend a Paring knife and a 5" or so utility knife. I have a Kikuichi Gold utility knife that stays razor sharp.
post #114 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe View Post

The old Sabatier carbon steel knives are amazing, if a pain to maintain.
"patina" man, "patina"
Quote:
Foo, buy a knife that feels good in your hand and is easy to maintain. The best knife, if poorly maintained, is no better than cheap junk. If you can get past the OneKinife to a second or third piece, I recommend a Paring knife and a 5" or so utility knife.

solid wisdom.
post #115 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

that's the one i loved most too. bought it. with my own money. yes, i have a knife problem. (maybe not quite as bad as matt's; we'll have to do a knife-off). Honestly, i do about 98% of my cutting with two knives, but I probably have 20-25 in my blocks (yes, plural). many years ago a woodworking website had a sale on this huge trove of old sabatiers they found in Thiers. amazing stuff -- some pre-wwi. hand-hammered rivets and all. and the prices were ridiculous, like $50 for the most expensive. I still remember the day those packages arrived. one was a demi-hachette that was like a cross between a chef's knife and a cleaver. all of them were carbon, so they do take some care, but it's amazing how quickly they come to razor-sharp.

I do not have a problem!

Because of this damn threak I have learned that I can get a knife sharper on a stone than I can with an edge pro, that for some reason I can get a very hard stainless knife sharper than I can a hard stanless knife which I can get sharper than I can a slightly harder carbon knife. Basically all the same exact shape at the same angles on the same stones. OK, maybe I have a problem. The Edge Pro is still way better for thinning out edges and cutting in bevels, but I find my magic touch is better for finishing something up really sharp.

Oh, I have one of those knives also, the chef-de-chef aka lobster knife.
post #116 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Wow. I've heard of almost none of those.

Hattori is a nice knife. I like them but the profile and handle are not for me. Kramer is really famous but I dislike the profiles of his knives strongly. I recognize the Masamoto name but I have not played with one of their Japanese style knives, which is what is depicted.

Really, aside from the Nenox (ahem), you really ought to be focusing on either a Mac Pro or a Masamoto VG. Those are the best value knives on the market. Everything above that is, well ... I say that as the owner of Kikiuchi which cost about 30% more. Nice knife but I bought it in part because Korin was out of stock on the Masamoto and because I let someone talk me out of the Misono UX10 even though I vastly preferred its handle. (To be fair, the Kikiuichi does use better steel than either.)

A damascus knife is for hanging on the wall. If you actually use it, clean it, sharpen it, the pattern will fade and the knife will eventually look funky in a bad way. I just would not bother. I have bothered in the past and it wasn't worth it.

You sure about that? Fake Damascus, yes. But real Damascus?
post #117 of 291
Don't know, I only have experienc with the fake stuff.
post #118 of 291
Yeah, the fake is just etching on the surface. The real Damascus is intrinsic.
post #119 of 291
it's my understanding (perhaps faulty), that real damascus is mainly a thing of legend. i don't think it's actually produced anymore -- or has been for a couple of hundred years.
post #120 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

it's my understanding (perhaps faulty), that real damascus is mainly a thing of legend. i don't think it's actually produced anymore -- or has been for a couple of hundred years.

Right. The real stuff and if we applied an "appellation d'origine contrôlée" to the steel it would be defined by a very particular iron ore.
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