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Best bespoke commission ever? I think so. *** PICTURES ADDED FOR THOSE LACKING IMAGINATION - Page 17

post #241 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovelace View Post





What do you think?

I think I've seen this on western style clothing for the last 100 years. We would use the same singular shape point on the back of collar to make it symmetrical.smile.gif
post #242 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

The goal isn't to make the garments look symmetric, it is to make your body look symmetric....

And these asymmetric details contribute to that somehow?
post #243 of 436
Also, with the current trend towards softer tailoring, something like a dropped shoulder just gets accommodated by the jacket. Instead of padding up one shoulder to make them even, the tailor just cuts the jacket so that it fits to the body, so that the dropped shoulder is still evident if you look for it. All these things go towards a more casual look, but it's not inconsistent with classic tailoring IMHO. It's just a matter of how fastidious the wearer wants to look. The difference in the (very limited, so take with a huge grain of salt) asymmetric non-CM garments that I have seen are that they are more aggressively and intentionally asymmetrical.
post #244 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

And these asymmetric details contribute to that somehow?

No but they don't distract from that goal, which is one of several...adornment and historical tradition that cannot really be accounted for today abound, I am in no way pretending, like foo, that menswear aesthetic are rational and they are certainly not minimal. However the few basic goals are not very often triffled with, although it is in the nature of .spezzatura or whatever to somewhat have certain individual present themselves as if they didn't care for them.
post #245 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovelace View Post




What do you think?

lurker[1].gif
post #246 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post


Then it cannot be worn sucessfully with a traditional menswear wardrobe so he is selling to the wrong clients and should approach L'Éclaireur or Dover street market to sell it along Carol Christian Poell, Comme des Garçons, Paul Harnden, Aithor Troup or whatever.


Who says his client was in the market for a traditional wardrobe, or wishes to wear it with traditional accessories.

 

I'm not quite sure I understand your point.

post #247 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovelace View Post


Who says his client was in the market for a traditional wardrobe, or wishes to wear it with traditional accessories.

I'm not quite sure I understand your point.

If a plumber puts a urinal in a restroom it is a functional item to dispose of bodily waste, if Duchamp puts it in a museum it is an artwork. I am not trying to build a hierarchy here but a tailor, discussed in the MC section and known for his suiting and overcoats is sold to clients wearing traditional menswear. If he wasn't it's not like Dopey would know of him and I wouldn't, his audience is clear from even a few cues like this. A specific individual might go against the grain but that doesn't change the overall rule.
post #248 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by etkl View Post

I have the same Moorbrook fabric in dark brown and beige. After seeing your coat, it has moved to the top of next winter's pile. I assume you are happy with the way it made up.
yes
very very pleased
with the way it turned up
it is the perfect overcoating
warm and holds its shape
perfectly

you will not be disappointed
post #249 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

If a plumber puts a urinal in a restroom it is a functional item to dispose of bodily waste, if Duchamp puts it in a museum it is an artwork. I am not trying to build a hierarchy here but a tailor, discussed in the MC section and known for his suiting and overcoats is sold to clients wearing traditional menswear. If he wasn't it's not like Dopey would know of him and I wouldn't, his audience is clear from even a few cues like this. A specific individual might go against the grain but that doesn't change the overall rule.

For what it's worth, the tailor of those jackets, Davide Taub, has a reputation for being fairly avante garde for Savile Row (particularly for being head cutter at one of the oldest houses, Gieves & Hawkes). An excerpt from a recent interview:
Quote:
What designer brands do you like?

A few years back Rick Owen's 'tailored' pieces were interesting in the way that they show it is possible to play around with conventional proportions but still be very wearable. I loved the extremely close-figured body, very narrow structured shoulders and over long, tight sleeves... paired with low slung, baggy seated trousers.

Japanese designers like Rei Kawakubo are amazing, the way they can take traditional techniques but deconstruct them in a critical way to make you see beauty in the unconventional. Also The Non, produces stunning clothing with lots of great tailoring and cutting techniques that I wish I knew!

http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2012/12/davide-taub-style-and-tailor.html
post #250 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post


If a plumber puts a urinal in a restroom it is a functional item to dispose of bodily waste, if Duchamp puts it in a museum it is an artwork. I am not trying to build a hierarchy here but a tailor, discussed in the MC section and known for his suiting and overcoats is sold to clients wearing traditional menswear. If he wasn't it's not like Dopey would know of him and I wouldn't, his audience is clear from even a few cues like this. A specific individual might go against the grain but that doesn't change the overall rule.


Yes, I agree. The vast majority of his business will be the conventional.

 

I think I said this in an earlier post, or something along the same lines.

 

The tailor is just showing us what he is capable of and how flexible he is.

 

I believe he originally trained at a military tailors before moving onto Maurice Sedwell and Edward Sexton of Nutters fame.

post #251 of 436


that's him second from the left. He looks great. So does the brunette girl.
post #252 of 436
Some additional examples of Davide Taub's work below. I think it's pretty clear that while he doesn't feel constrained by the "lexicon of classic tailoring" or whatever, his work doesn't lack a point of view or commitment.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



























01G&Hbespoke12.jpg




post #253 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post



that's him second from the left. He looks great. So does the brunette girl.

I believe that's his wife, wearing one of his garments.
post #254 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by T4phage View Post

yes
very very pleased
with the way it turned up
it is the perfect overcoating
warm and holds its shape
perfectly

you will not be disappointed

I'm sure I won't be. Thanks.
post #255 of 436
^
pay attention
to the thickness
at teh back
if you decide
to do a belted
back
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