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Best bespoke commission ever? I think so. *** PICTURES ADDED FOR THOSE LACKING IMAGINATION - Page 12

post #166 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Yeah, I saw that one back when I put in my order. I actually showed the photos to Mariano to give him an idea of the kind of coat I wanted, though I was clear I wanted very different detailing. He did not like what he saw. If I recall correctly, he winced at the back yoke.

 

Taub adds this curved yoke detail to some of the jackets he makes too, I think he's trying to create a kind of signature feature if you like. I think this is something his clients request, as opposed to a default offering.

 

I'm not keen myself, but obviously some like it and it is bespoke after all.

post #167 of 436
Thread Starter 
Is there any function to it?

I generally hate when tailors play fashion designer. I mean, to some extent, every tailor must make his own design decisions. Yet, it seems much of the time the impetus is to do something better or do it the "right" way or simply to solve a problem. That back yoke detail appears to reflect no such motive, but is just there to say "This is a Taub!"
post #168 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by T4phage View Post

not that unfamilar to neapolitans
some photos of panico's coats
have a similar construction

i found two pix of my coat
in my phone
the pocket construction
is broadly similar

the fabric is a 32oz/1kg
vintage moorebrook




I have the same Moorbrook fabric in dark brown and beige. After seeing your coat, it has moved to the top of next winter's pile. I assume you are happy with the way it made up.
post #169 of 436

I quite like the originality of Taube's work. I'm tired of seeing the same old 6x2 DB overcoats, and 2-button SB jackets. I applaud his willingness to think (and tailor) out of the box.

post #170 of 436
I don't buy that he's trying to make a signature design.

It looks like he was trying to connect up the lines on the back of the arms.

Whatever he was doing, I don't mind the look tbh and the coat overall looks amazing.
post #171 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Is there any function to it?

I generally hate when tailors play fashion designer. I mean, to some extent, every tailor must make his own design decisions. Yet, it seems much of the time the impetus is to do something better or do it the "right" way or simply to solve a problem. That back yoke detail appears to reflect no such motive, but is just there to say "This is a Taub!"
I think he does it to line up with the seams on the sleeve so you have a nice continuous line from wrist to wrist. It is a purely aesthetic choice, but not arbitrary.
post #172 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by etkl View Post

I have the same Moorbrook fabric in dark brown and beige. After seeing your coat, it has moved to the top of next winter's pile. I assume you are happy with the way it made up.

I do as well, but mine is only 2m. I love it, but I don't know what to do with it. If you have extra, please let me know as I would love to have it made up.
post #173 of 436
Some discussion regarding the Taub coat.

http://www.cutterandtailor.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=2066&st=0

I recall something about the curved back seams being related to military overcoats but I don't remember where I saw it.
post #174 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


See, that interior breast pocket looks normal to me. Why do that versus the horizontal one and vice-versa?

It is normal. I don't use the horizontal so I didn't do it. I don't use these and could have done without them and had the lower patch only.

Thinking to start making the horizontal pocket sized for sunglasses, not gloves
post #175 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Taube is awesome.

+100
post #176 of 436
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

I don't buy that he's trying to make a signature design . . . It looks like he was trying to connect up the lines on the back of the arms.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

I think he does it to line up with the seams on the sleeve so you have a nice continuous line from wrist to wrist. It is a purely aesthetic choice, but not arbitrary.

Clearly it was not by accident that the yoke lines up with the sleeve seams. However, that doesn't liberate the feature from the realm of gimmick for me. I've never thought that the sleeve seems needed to be connected, for either functional or purely aesthetic reasons. In fact, I think it's an aesthetic negative. Yes, he's created a new, contiguous horizontal plane--but at the expense of interrupting the more flattering vertical plane, which used to run from collar to coat bottom.
post #177 of 436
Foo, are you wearing a coat under there?

If not, might be a bit too snug, no?
post #178 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Is there any function to it?

I generally hate when tailors play fashion designer. I mean, to some extent, every tailor must make his own design decisions. Yet, it seems much of the time the impetus is to do something better or do it the "right" way or simply to solve a problem. That back yoke detail appears to reflect no such motive, but is just there to say "This is a Taub!"

 

Well, I think there's a little bit of a designer in every tailor and in the early days the tailor was the designer.

 

The yoke is just a decorative feature. As to it saying "I am a Taub" doesn't a house style do the same thing? Rubinacci have a distinctive cut that announces "I am a Rubinacci" does it not?

 

Back treatments like this aren't new, take a look at some of the old pictures of sports coats from the 30's. You'll find a bewildering range of back treatments, some functional like a bi-swing others purely decorative

 

Here is a pattern Taub's created for a jacket with a curved yoke amongst over features.

 

 

 

Don't be put off by these types of tailors, there's a tendency to think that they can't cut a conservative business suit. Most of their business is likely to be such business suits.

 

In some ways though they are the very definition of bespoke tailoring, in that they are flexible and willing to collaborate with the customer to make something unique and special, like Rubinacci did with your coat.

post #179 of 436
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by quar View Post

Foo, are you wearing a coat under there?

If not, might be a bit too snug, no?

No, I wasn't in that photo. But the coat was fitted over one of my thicker tweed odd jackets. When not wearing a suit or odd jacket, it is very, very roomy.
post #180 of 436
You fell into a foo.gif trap.
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