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Borrelli v. kiton - Page 4

post #46 of 63
Originally posted by Shoefan:
Quote:
My understanding of the Kiton bespoke offering is very limited; this _may_ be synonomous with their "K 50" suit, which is personally fitted, cut, and sewn by one man -. I'm sure others will be able to provide more specific information. This suit may be le ne plus ultra, as it should be for around $10k. See: Kiton K50 suit for info on the Kiton and Oxxford bespoke offerings
Yes, you can choose other cloths. Although I was first introduced to it by the K 50 (which is very very nice, but I mainly use it for evenings since they are quite delicate).
post #47 of 63
I too started out worried about "getting what I wanted" when buying a suit, slacks or blazer on EBay. After now buying dozens of items, I know to eye carefully the exact measurements (don't go by the listed size); don't buy something that doesn't include the exact measurements; and only buy items that have several good pictures, including close-ups. I've learned to err on the side of buying something a little big. And, I've gotten to know well a couple of tailors around Washington, DC who are able to make expert alterations -- taking in, letting out, etc. I recently paid one nearly $600 after he made alterations to various items I had bought at Filene's and on EBay. In the end, not only do I have clothes that look and fit great -- yes, getting exactly what I want -- I have the satisfaction of having gotten a good deal.
post #48 of 63
Kabert, Do you mind me asking who your tailor is?   I need some work done on an attolini and an isaia and am terrified of what might happen if I don't choose my tailor wisely. I am currently thinking of using Christopher Kim. He has done only very basic work for me in the past (hemming pant legs) so I can't evaluate the quality of his work.
post #49 of 63
I'd buy an Attolini or a Borrelli if I could ever find one in my size. And the department stores here don't carry anything great, either. I mean, the suits are nice, but the style and cut just aren't what I'm looking for (Korean men like the ventless sack suit, for some reason.) Still, maybe someday, I'll be able to take a trip to either Mr. Beaman or Raphael to hopefully get the best fit with the best construction in one (relatively) affordable package.
post #50 of 63
Dr. Bresch: This Forum will not be ruined by ad hominem attacks. They are not allowed and members have been banned for them.
post #51 of 63
Quote:
Kabert, Do you mind me asking who your tailor is? I need some work done on an attolini and an isaia and am terrified of what might happen if I don't choose my tailor wisely. I am currently thinking of using Christopher Kim. He has done only very basic work for me in the past (hemming pant legs) so I can't evaluate the quality of his work.
I'd actually like to hear this as well. I've tried Christopher Kim and Joe Sauro and have mixed opinions. I found a seamstress who can do slacks so I'm more concerned about the jacket: finding a tailor who can do sleeves (and adjust the buttons correctly without my prompting) and one who might be able to take in the body of a side vent jacket and keep the flap down (although it may be a function of a RTW jacket).
post #52 of 63
They may not be fused, but Kiton (at least RTW) suits do not have hand-sewn pad stitches on the lapels. Just take a look at the little Kiton book at some Kiton-carrying stores. Borrelli pad stitching is done by hand, or at least that is what was shown in the flash video of their suits on the web site before they updated the web site a few months ago. One interesting detail of the men's shirts at the Borrelli store in NYC: the buttons have little "ridges" at the top, unlike the otherwise identical buttons found on Borrelli shirts at stores like Neiman Marcus.
post #53 of 63
I still am not sure about that Kiton pad stitching fact. It may be true that they use a blind stitch -- most Italian suits seem to nowadays, and indeed even on Oxxfords nowadays you see less of the dimpling than you used to -- but can't you do a blind stitch by hand?
post #54 of 63
The Savile Row firms generally have specialists, be they in-house or out-workers, who specialize in jackets, or trousers, or buttonholes.  However, certainly the degree/extent of specialization is much less than that of Oxxford, Brioni, et al. ................................................................................... Shoefan: are you saying that Oxxford, Brioni etc (top RTW suits) are outsourced more than lesser end suits? Don't Brioni etc have specialists under the one roof? l suppose Armani does [have less outsourcing because of the simpler construction of the suit] The salesperson in the Borrelli shop told me to only wear a Borrelli suit once a week and that the suit would last for five years. This means you can only wear a Borrelli suit 250 times before it is haggard and worn out. What hog-wash. The padding in the Borrelli lapels are entirely stitched by hand. Only criticism l can make of Borrelli is their single button cashmere jackets. The style looks alittle clumbsy and more middle of the road styling.
post #55 of 63
Marc37: I believe Shoefan was saying that individual tailors within Oxxford's or Brioni's facility specialize on doing a single task (sewing armholes for example) whereas on the Row a tailor might make the entire jacket himself.
post #56 of 63
In response to a couple of requests above, the tailor I've used is Field's English Custom Tailors. It's run by a father and son -- William Field Sr. and Jr. Both fine gentlemen. Walk in the shop on any given day and they're in there sewing away. They do a very nice bespoke business also. Anyway, because they are making custom suits, jackets, overcoats, etc. all day long, they know what can and can't be done and what will and won't work. Fields is located just above Georgetown on Wisconsin Avenue. Just past R street before the Social Safeway. While there, check out Sky Valet shoes for their selection of Vass, Weston, Sargent and Alden. Also take a look in Everard's Clothing for nice accessories -- belts, ties, etc.
post #57 of 63
I stopped by Saks and took a look at the Borrelli shirts there. Sure enough, these shirts now also have buttons with tiny "ridges" at the tops.
post #58 of 63
Quote:
I stopped by Saks and took a look at the Borrelli shirts there. Sure enough, these shirts now also have buttons with tiny "ridges" at the tops.
They started doing this late last year or early this year. The shirts that you saw at NM were probably made before that. Or perhaps NM puts its very large foot down and said that the edge reeding was not acceptable. I know that I don't like it -- it seems to me that it will tear up the stitching on the buttonholes.
post #59 of 63
Speaking of buttons, I've come to appreciate the buttons on Barba shirts. Super-thick like Borrelli, yet with even more of a MOP luster/rainbow effect. Plus, they obviously take great care -- I've got one Barba in dark blue linen, and the buttons seem to have a subtle blue hue to them.
post #60 of 63
Quote:
Quote:
(banksmiranda @ 22 June 2004, 10:34) I stopped by Saks and took a look at the Borrelli shirts there. Sure enough, these shirts now also have buttons with tiny "ridges" at the tops.
They started doing this late last year or early this year. The shirts that you saw at NM were probably made before that. Or perhaps NM puts its very large foot down and said that the edge reeding was not acceptable. I know that I don't like it -- it seems to me that it will tear up the stitching on the buttonholes.
Just on a tangent: NM's foot is so large (they are the biggest buyer of Zegna in the world) that if they want something changed regarding finish, material, size, etc...on a particular item they are usually obliged. I wonder how many other stores have tat kind of power... Jon.
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