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First proper watch - Page 4

post #46 of 69

Grand Seikos are watches internet nerds who never actually purchase them work themselves up into a frenzy over - such good value they coo, but somehow no one actually puts their money where their mouth is and buys one. I find them soulless with insipid designs, and the logo design alone is dreadful enough that I would avoid the whole marque because of it.

 

Go to kitchen, get step stool, reach high above the fridge and grab balls, re-attach and purchase real watch.

post #47 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scabal Fanatic View Post

In your opinion, which watch should I buy if I have around $10,000 to spend? I understand that your "view" of a watch is like mine, rare thing in 2013... 

 

I am looking for a classical watch (under 40 mm), a good movement (maybe mechanical, maybe not), no need for gold or diamonds (only increase the price for the look, not quality related to me).

 

 

 

What is a $10K watch without a mechanical movement? Do you mean a quartz movement or something else?

post #48 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scabal Fanatic View Post

Hi apropos,

 

I was reading the whole post on the forum and I saw that you have extensive knowledge of watches so I would like to ask you a question.

 

In your opinion, which watch should I buy if I have around $10,000 to spend? I understand that your "view" of a watch is like mine, rare thing in 2013... 

 

I am looking for a classical watch (under 40 mm), a good movement (maybe mechanical, maybe not), no need for gold or diamonds (only increase the price for the look, not quality related to me).

 

Yesterday, I was looking at the Jaeger Le Coultre web site and the Master section caught my attention. The "Master Réserve de Marche", calibre 938 seemed nice and in my price range. Would that be a good choice?

 

I know the top 4 brands in the world but right now, cannot afford them. If you have suggestions, I would really appreciate them.

 

Thank you.

1. I could give you my preferences but they may not fit you or your lifestyle.

 

2. I would highly recommend getting a mechanical watch and not a quartz watch.

 

3. Watches tend to be personal and many people have different likes, dislikes and opinions. For the price your paying I would highly recommend taking sometime and make sure you have done some research to ensure your getting something you'll be happy with not only now, but potentially 20 years or even 40 years from now.

 

4. Do yourself a favor and check the cost of servicing (Even quartz watches require servicing.) , and resale value just in case you change your mind later. Some watches do tend to resale at a lesser value later. Some of these also can be had at greater discount up front as well. Do the math, just in case. Invest sometime and get a keeper and these things won't matter as much.

 

5. Check to see if the movement was made in house or not. This matters to some and some do not. JLC in house by the way.

 

6. Rolex, IWC, JLC, and Omega sell some pretty nice options at or around this price point. For a bit more you could even get an AP. Get the one that sings to you. If I gave you my choice at this price point I would get some that would agree and some who would disagree with me.

 

7. Your current option by the way is a great choice, that is if that's the one you like the most.

post #49 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGLL View Post

Thanks for the advice, it's much appreciated.  Being 24, I could deal with the 3227-01's 'trendyness'! I must say that I do have a soft spot for the IWC, I dont know why as I have never even seen it in person... I do really like the RO and I could afford it now but I can't justify myself spending that much on my first proper watch.  

I do really like the look of the Omega Aqua Terra.  Is there anyone who owns an Ingenieur here who can give me advice on its ownership? 

I am inclined to tell you to get the 3227-01, because it seems like you really like it best, but are concerned what others think.

That said, if you really do like the RO, I can actually think of no better time to get it than as your first "real" watch. Your first real watch will always be special and the one you are most likely to keep indefinitely. If you have to, wait awhile until you can justify it. It helps you in several ways:

1. The RO is an excellent piece from "the big three"

2. If you still really like it after waiting that amount of time, you will know you did the right thing.

I do not own an aqua terra, so I cannot help you there. Personally, I would without question take an IWC over it though.
post #50 of 69
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post #51 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post

1. I could give you my preferences but they may not fit you or your lifestyle.

2. I would highly recommend getting a mechanical watch and not a quartz watch.

3. Watches tend to be personal and many people have different likes, dislikes and opinions. For the price your paying I would highly recommend taking sometime and make sure you have done some research to ensure your getting something you'll be happy with not only now, but potentially 20 years or even 40 years from now.

4. Do yourself a favor and check the cost of servicing (Even quartz watches require servicing.) , and resale value just in case you change your mind later. Some watches do tend to resale at a lesser value later. Some of these also can be had at greater discount up front as well. Do the math, just in case. Invest sometime and get a keeper and these things won't matter as much.

5. Check to see if the movement was made in house or not. This matters to some and some do not. JLC in house by the way.

6. Rolex, IWC, JLC, and Omega sell some pretty nice options at or around this price point. For a bit more you could even get an AP. Get the one that sings to you. If I gave you my choice at this price point I would get some that would agree and some who would disagree with me.

7. Your current option by the way is a great choice, that is if that's the one you like the most.

^^ This is good advice and to add onto the whole whether the movement should be in house or not keep in mind that all of the big three (Patek Philippe, Vacheron Constantin, Audemars Piguet) have at some point and some models still do (maybe not patek anymore) use JLC movements. I would also suggest looking at the Reverso range in stainless steel from JLC at that price point
post #52 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff13007 View Post


^^ This is good advice and to add onto the whole whether the movement should be in house or not keep in mind that all of the big three (Patek Philippe, Vacheron Constantin, Audemars Piguet) have at some point and some models still do (maybe not patek anymore) use JLC movements. I would also suggest looking at the Reverso range in stainless steel from JLC at that price point

Not sure about the others, but Patek no longer does.

post #53 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post

Not sure about the others, but Patek no longer does.

Recently Patek is all in house now if I'm not mistaken they even use the "Patek seal" instead of the Geneva seal now which is 4 something as opposed to 7 (not quite sure what this is but apparently the lower the number the better some deviation thing). Not quite sure about AP but Vacheron uses JLC for at least some movements they have only recently started moving to in house, if i remember correctly my malte grand classique movement was the first manual wind non complicated movement they have produced in house for a long time. But anyway my point was that although it sounds nice to have an "in house movement" a lot of the top brands used another maker at one point or another so it really shouldn't be that big of an issue unless you wanna go around going "nyahh nyahh nyahh my watch has a in house movement nyahh nyahh nyahh". And another thing just because the movement is from JLC doesn't make the watch "manufactured by JLC" i.e Edward Green making shoes for RLPL. I would compare them more along the lines of BMW making the engine for the original Mclaren F1 or lotus designing the "spine" for the Nissan GTR.
post #54 of 69
Will everyone stop referring to the Explorer as the Explorer I! Rimmers.

The OP wants a watch on bracelet, so stop recommending Reversos. Rimmers.

Surprised no one mentioned the Speedy Pro - looks great with anything but a tux, and can be worn anywhere but in the pool/sea. With a $5k budget, the OP could find a mint pre-owned 3570.50 and still have enough for a similar condition 2254.50

The point of diminishing returns for a watch is far below $5k. Saying that, I have 4 watches all in the 5-8k range that all get worn and will never get sold (well maybe one). My next several purchases will all be pre-owned/vintage.

Buy what makes you smile.
post #55 of 69
Both the AP Dualtime and VC Overseas Dualtime use a JLC movement - not sure if there are others.
post #56 of 69
Just thought I would chime in and mention a Panerai with quick release mechanism. The Panerai I have is the 233, which is above the OP's price point, but less complicated models can be had used for under $5k. The big advantage, to me, is the ability to change straps easily. I rotate about 5 different straps from ammo strap casual to shiny black alligator depending. Even though I have a "better" watch for my dress watch (Lange 1 in platinum), the Panerai is more versatile and gets more comments than my "stealth" Lange.
post #57 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff13007 View Post


Recently Patek is all in house now if I'm not mistaken they even use the "Patek seal" instead of the Geneva seal now which is 4 something as opposed to 7 (not quite sure what this is but apparently the lower the number the better some deviation thing). Not quite sure about AP but Vacheron uses JLC for at least some movements they have only recently started moving to in house, if i remember correctly my malte grand classique movement was the first manual wind non complicated movement they have produced in house for a long time. But anyway my point was that although it sounds nice to have an "in house movement" a lot of the top brands used another maker at one point or another so it really shouldn't be that big of an issue unless you wanna go around going "nyahh nyahh nyahh my watch has a in house movement nyahh nyahh nyahh". And another thing just because the movement is from JLC doesn't make the watch "manufactured by JLC" i.e Edward Green making shoes for RLPL. I would compare them more along the lines of BMW making the engine for the original Mclaren F1 or lotus designing the "spine" for the Nissan GTR.

Actually the way I understand it the Geneva Seal refers to a certification in regards to quality of finishing and decoration of the movement and not in regards to accuracy or timing. COSC is another certification manufactures can submit for (pay for) to have their movements tested for accuracy -4/+6 seconds daily. Rolex submits more watches to COSC every year than anyone else. They make more Luxury watches than anyone else, and besides they provide the actual machine to COSC to conduct the testing.

 

Anyway not long ago Patek announced that instead of having an outside agency do any testing they would certify their own watches.If you check Wikipedia you'll find that these outside agency requirements which may have meant something at one time a long time ago are no longer that difficult to meet.

 

I for one would be more than happy to accept whatever watches Patek would like to give me with their own internal seal. I have full faith and confidence that their standards are pretty  high..

post #58 of 69
Typing on phone keyboard, replies will be brief.

Patel Seal is simply a more stringent Geneva seal. There is a lot out on the net abt it.

The JLC MC RdM is an excellent choice.
Please take the time to handle it in person as the dial looks quite different in real life.

Good call whoever mentioned the Speedmaster - that too is the other obvious choice.
post #59 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luvwine View Post

Just thought I would chime in and mention a Panerai with quick release mechanism. The Panerai I have is the 233, which is above the OP's price point, but less complicated models can be had used for under $5k. The big advantage, to me, is the ability to change straps easily. I rotate about 5 different straps from ammo strap casual to shiny black alligator depending. Even though I have a "better" watch for my dress watch (Lange 1 in platinum), the Panerai is more versatile and gets more comments than my "stealth" Lange.

He mentioned size being a major issue; I've never seen a Panerai in my life that isn't completely obtuse or blobby.
post #60 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by saysomething View Post

Will everyone stop referring to the Explorer as the Explorer I! Rimmers.

The OP wants a watch on bracelet, so stop recommending Reversos. Rimmers.

Surprised no one mentioned the Speedy Pro - looks great with anything but a tux, and can be worn anywhere but in the pool/sea. With a $5k budget, the OP could find a mint pre-owned 3570.50 and still have enough for a similar condition 2254.50

The point of diminishing returns for a watch is far below $5k. Saying that, I have 4 watches all in the 5-8k range that all get worn and will never get sold (well maybe one). My next several purchases will all be pre-owned/vintage.

Buy what makes you smile.

Since when does a reverso have to be on a leather strap?
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