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Words+Bindings - The Fashion Books Thread - Page 2

post #16 of 139
For the 032c issue you don't need to scan everything, just a couple pages that are representative, some kind of description etc. Things to give people an idea of the content and eventually whether it's worth buying or not, practical stuff.


Rewind / Forward definitely belongs here. Let's do that one.




Quote:
Rewind/Forward 1995-2000

Edition: M/M Paris
Year: 2001
Paperback + glossy dust jacket
286 pages

Availability: ebay sometimes or $$$










The book was published to celebrate Yohji's 20 years in fashion and compiles all the images and images/collages (238 in total) produced in the 5 previous years (so from 1995 to 2000) with work from photographers Paolo Roversi, David Sims, Inez & Vinoodh and Craig McDean.

As Snake mentioned, it's a great little book. Yeah it's damn small by fashion/art books standard, I was pretty surprised when it arrived. All photographs are printed full-page though so it's not that bad. The book uses different kinds of paper throughout for dat heightened tactile experience (matte stiff paper, glossy thin paper etc). The binding creaks like hell at each turn of the page but has yet to break.

The images are displayed in no particular order seasons-wise, only womenswear stuff btw. There are no texts or captions, but you'll find an index at the end of the book referencing the various photographers/art directors/models and the associated page numbers.

Saddly, the book as been out of print for a while so it tends to go for a premium price, there have been a couple on ebay recently at more reasonable prices.





















Edited by sipang - 1/10/13 at 4:45pm
post #17 of 139
is this for books only ?

some re-posts

not the right place! (Click to show)
CCP Vogue, March 2000 (Click to show)
CDG scans (Click to show)
Quote:
Image details
Image 1
Retail informationPolyester sheer coat. Rayon and polyester sleeveless coat. Comme des Gargons by Rei Kawakubo. Hat, Comme des Gannons by Rei Kawakubo, $785. Comme des Gannons Boutique, NYC; June Blaker, Chicago.
Image 2
Retail informationRayon and acetate top. Rayon and polyester skirt. Susan, San Francisco and Burlingame CA. Manicure, Roxanna Nearsu for Warren-Tricomi Salon.
Title Fashion: Fashion's Visionary: Even As Her Comme Des Garçons Label Marks Its Twentieth Anniversary, Rei Kawakubo, The Woman Who Has Taken Apart And Redefined The Very Concept Of Clothing, Is Still Expanding The Boundaries Of Her Revolutionary Style
Author Bowles, Hamish
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 183
Issue 3
Pages 344, 345, 346, 347, 426
Publication year 1993

494492494
492493
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Comme Des Garçons (Comme Des Garcons)
Editor Mirabella, Grace (1971-1988)
Volume 177
Issue 10
Pages 80, 81
Publication year 1987

477474
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Comme Des Garçons (Comme Des Garcons)
Editor Mirabella, Grace (1971-1988)
Volume 175
Issue 10
Pages 309
Publication year 1985
493
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Comme Des Garçons (Comme Des Garcons)
Editor Mirabella, Grace (1971-1988)
Volume 177
Issue 3
Pages 78, 79
Publication year 1987
479478
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Comme Des Garçons (Comme Des Garcons)
Editor Mirabella, Grace (1971-1988)
Volume 178
Issue 9
Pages 156, 157
Publication year 1988
489488
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Comme Des Garçons
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 179
Issue 9
Pages 270, 271
Publication year 1989
486486
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Comme Des Garçons
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 179
Issue 3
Pages 173, 174, 175
Publication year 1989
Journal subject
486487487
Quote:
Title Fashion: Fashion Portfolios: The Rei Way: The Influential Fashion Dissident Rei Kawakubo, Head Designer And President Of Comme Des Garçons, Made Her Name With Highly Inventive, Artful Designs. This Fall Her Collection Also Exposes Her Singular Vision Of Romantic Evening Wear
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 185
Issue 10
Pages 344, 345, 346, 347
Publication year 1995
493493489493
Quote:
Image details
Image 1
Retail informationSmall bag ($900) and large bag ($1,500). Louis Vuitton Boutique, NYC, Bal Harbour FL. Dallas. Beverly Hills, San Francisco.
Title Fashion: Vogue View: Turning Japanese: When Comme Des Garçons Said, ''Come To Paris,'' Jun Takahashi Listened. Now The Fashion World Is All Ears....
Author Mower, Sarah
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 192
Issue 12
Pages 182
Publication year 2002
496
Quote:
Image details
Image 1
Retail informationTop also at Riccardi, Boston; Susan, San Francisco and Burlingame CA. Nylon and polyurethane tights also at Christian Michi, Charleston SC; Cielo, Palo Alto CA. Hat and boots, Comme des Garçons by Rei Kawakubo. Comme des Garçons Boutique, SoHo NYC. Boots also at June Blaker, Chicago. Chair at Comme des Garçons Boutique, SoHo NYC.
Image 2
Retail informationNylon and polyurethane tights, Comme des Garçons by Rei Kawakubo, $35. Charivari, NYC; Christian Michi, Charleston SC; Linda Dresner, Birmingham MI; Cielo, Palo Alto CA. Hat and boots, Comme des Garçons by Rei Kawakubo. Comme des Garçons Boutique, SoHo NYC. Hat also at Maxfield, Los Angeles. Boots also at June Blaker, Chicago.
Image 3
Retail informationWool and nylon jacket and pants. Jacket also at Linda Dresner, Birmingham MI; Susan, Burlingame CA; Ralph Davies, San Francisco. Pants also at Cielo, Palo Alto CA. Shoes, Comme des Garçons by Rei Kawakubo. Comme des Garçons Boutique, SoHo NYC.
Image 4
Retail informationGown, $7,125. Gown, $5,090.
Title Fashion: Star Turn
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 181
Issue 7
Pages 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147
Publication year 1991
479[/URL476477
475479477
Quote:
Image details
Image 1
Retail informationWool/nylon sweater. Wool jersey T-shirt Accessories, Comme des Garçons.
Image 2
Retail informationTurnout also at Alan Bilzerian, Boston and Worcester MA; Cielo Boutique, Palo Alto CA; Mari Boutique, Ontario and British Columbia Canada. Accessories, Comme des Garçons
Image 3
Retail informationTurnout also at Ultimo, Chicago; Maxfield, Los Angeles. Accessories, Comme des Garçons
Title Another World Of Style...Rei Kawakubo
Author KLENSCH, ELSA
Editor Mirabella, Grace (1971-1988)
Volume 177
Issue 8
Pages 306, 307, 308, 309, 377
Publication year 1987
481481481
479480
Yohji ads (Click to show)
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Yohji Yamamoto (Yohji Yamamoto)
Editor Mirabella, Grace (1971-1988)
Volume 178
Issue 9
Pages 456, 457
Publication year 1988
493493
Quote:
Title Fashion: talking fashion: A YEN FOR YOHJI
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 187
Issue 5
Pages 104
Publication year 1997
488
Quote:
Title Advertisement: Yohji Yamamoto (Yohji Yamamoto)
Editor Mirabella, Grace (1971-1988)
Volume 175
Issue 9
Pages 197
Publication year 1985
486
By CATHY HORYN (Click to show)
Like Mona Lisa, Ever So Veiled



By CATHY HORYN
Published: May 30, 2012

TO appreciate the designs of Rei Kawakubo, the woman behind the label Comme des Garçons, it helps to be a specialist in fashion, or something of a kook.

Let’s consider her latest collection, shown in March in Paris. Not only were the brightly colored felt garments of a fun-house scale, but they were also completely flat. A dress had a front and a back, and the two pieces were joined at the sides. The simplicity was such that a clever child, using a cookie cutter, tracing paper and the photocopying services of Kinko’s, could produce the basic pattern. The wool felt was a good technical choice for the floating two-dimensional shapes, but the design, more than being merely simple, seemed to disclaim design.

Reaction during the show was immediate.

Editors smiled and nudged one another as the silly tents came down the bare plywood runway. Gradually, though, their gooey looks of delight turned to serious interest and finally to pleasure, the deep pleasure of seeing something rare and fully resolved and resistant to syllogisms.

Was Ms. Kawakubo commenting on the flattening of the world by the Internet? Was the lady, by fabricating such harmonious volumes without padding or other means, calling out lazy and weak-minded designers who tout couture techniques and don’t create anything new? Even the industry’s craze for bold color combinations and archival prints seemed to land in her cross hairs, and, not surprisingly, her choices were marked by intensity.

If Karl Lagerfeld is the leading talk artist of fashion, Ms. Kawakubo is the Mona Lisa. She makes no effort to reveal her meanings, though at times she explains her methods. That day in Paris, standing backstage, she greeted each guest with a brisk ceremonial nod. Small, nearly 70, she wore a black cotton jacket buttoned to the neck, black dhoti shorts and sunglasses that seemed a mischievous touch of celebrity — and that she has. No living designer with the exception of Azzedine Alaïa is held in higher esteem by her peers, and none has enriched our spirit in so many original and confounding ways.

“Kawakubo has done everything,” Jun Takahashi, the respected creator of Undercover, has said.

Indeed. On Monday, the Council of Fashion Designers of America will honor her with a lifetime achievement award.

Ms. Kawakubo, who lives in Tokyo, does not plan to attend the festivities, said her husband, Adrian Joffe. As much as it would thrill to see her on the Lincoln Center stage, it’s hard to imagine her actually being there. She stopped appearing on her own runway long ago, though she is easily accessible backstage and in her showroom.

In addition to managing Comme des Garçons Parfums and many day-to-day matters, Mr. Joffe serves as his wife’s interpreter (he is fluent in several languages). It is Mr. Joffe who provides journalists with a brief, prepared explanation after every show. In March it was: “the future in two dimensions.”

And, of course, the statement, while not pure nonsense, turned out to be pure quicksand, sucking people in.

The truth is that Ms. Kawakubo is not interested in seeking answers, at least not to the conventional type of questions asked above. She is not an artist, and she doesn’t consider herself to be one, per se, though her work over the last 30 years, since she assaulted people’s consciousness with a collection called Destroy, has impelled serious consideration far beyond fashion. (Ms. Kawakubo, who is the sole owner of Comme des Garçons, a small, $200 million conglomerate with a number of brands, including Junya Watanabe, once said that if she is anything, it’s a businesswoman, and then added, “Well, I’m an artist-businesswoman.”)

In 1996, Ms. Kawakubo presented a collection called Dress Meets Body Meets Dress, which featured disfiguring lumps of cotton wadding covered with cheerful gingham. She was criticized for being “antiwoman,” yet a closer look at her silhouette revealed that she was probably neutral on the subject of gender, and instead had done something of more profound meaning: she had recreated a reality of the late 20th century — that of the individual seemingly joined to her burdens, like a backpack.

Since then, Ms. Kawakubo’s work has grown in clarity and wisdom. Last October, a collection titled White Drama referred to ceremonial occasions, like a wedding, and was assumed by many to relate to her widely admired Broken Bride show, in 2005. For fall 2012, she followed with her two-dimension collection.

Ms. Kawakubo, however, insists that she is not a feminist, and that her work has nothing to do with being a woman. “I was never interested in any movement as such,” she said a few years back. Her position is at best ambiguous; early in her career she embraced such ideas. It may also be true that as her work has matured, she has reached wholly different conclusions about what nourishes the creative process.

No one has ever sufficiently explained how she has been able to retain the spirit of the 1970s and early ’80s, particularly its sense of experimentation, without getting mired in it. In all the years I’ve known Ms. Kawakubo, which is close to 15, I’ve never heard her talk about the past, nor have I thought to ask her. With many designers of her generation, the past is like a giant wading pool on a hot day.

“She’s not greedy,” the art director Ronnie Newhouse said, suggesting that the way Ms. Kawakubo chooses to live relates directly to her design process. Journalists often find it hard to take her at her word: that she lives a relatively normal life, in Tokyo. “Can’t rational people create mad work?” she once asked a writer.

A few years ago, while reporting an article about her, I asked Mr. Joffe if photos could be taken of her work space. He said it wouldn’t serve any purpose. He was right. The Comme des Garçons headquarters, which occupy several floors of a banal office building, look like design studios everywhere, and may even be drabber.

In the end, Ms. Kawakubo’s example may prove that the last thing you need to be in the creative fields is a specialist. In fact, it may be a hindrance, blinding you to new feelings. I recently asked Ms. Kawakubo one or two specifics about her design methods, mainly to be clear about what I already knew. Did she use a so-called “mood board,” for instance?

Here is her reply, by e-mail. I reprint it in total. It says everything, and it could not be said better.

“My design process never starts or finishes. I am always hoping to find something through the mere act of living my daily life. I do not work from a desk, and do not have an exact starting point for any collection. There is never a mood board, I do not go through fabric swatches, I do not sketch, there is no eureka moment, there is no end to the search for something new. As I live my normal life, I hope to find something that click starts a thought, and then something totally unrelated would arise, and then maybe a third unconnected element would come from nowhere. Often in each collection, there are three or so seeds of things that come together accidentally to form what appears to everyone else as a final product, but for me it is never ending. There is never a moment when I think, ‘this is working, this is clear.’ If for one second I think something is finished, the next thing would be impossible to do.

“Often the elements are completely disassociated in time and dimension. One might be an emotion, the next thing a pattern image, the third thing an object or a picture I have seen somewhere. I can never remember when and from where the elements come together in my head. I trust synergy and change. For fall 2012, I was thinking about no design being design, about very ordinary fabric (wool felt) being strong. Somehow, the two-dimension level of thinking became apparent.

“I do not feel happy when a collection is understood too well. For me, White Drama was too easily understood, the concept too clear. I feel better about fall 2012, because it wasn’t too clear, and some people assumed things it had nothing to do with, like the Internet age.

“The struggle to find something new gets more and more difficult with time and experience, so this time, for fall 2012, my feeling was to try to make a collection by doing very little.”[/quote]
Ann of Antwerp (Click to show)
Quote:
Image details
Image 1
Retail informationCotton sweater and pants.
Image 2
Retail informationCotton shirt. Viscose and cotton pants. T-shirt, $150. Shirt, T-shirt, and pants also at Ultimo, Chicago; Maxfield, Los Angeles. In this story, manicure, Sheril Bailey.
Title Fashion: Vogue's View: Ann Of Antwerp
Editor Wintour, Anna (1988-)
Volume 187
Issue 4
Pages 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353
Publication year 1997
488497493
496494492
Paul Harnden (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

Title:The Mysterious Paul Harnden
Author(s):Samantha Conti
Source:WWD. 200.121 (Dec. 10, 2010): p14.
Document Type:Article
Full Text:
Byline: Samantha Conti
Quote:
The Mysterious Paul Harnden

"PAUL, WE LOVE YOU! IF YOU GET TO READ THIS PIECE."

Such was John Galliano's shout-out to designer Paul Harnden in a conversation with WWD earlier this week.

Yet Harnden, a Canadian national long based in England, isn't ready for his close-up. Reached by telephone at his shop in Brighton, a seaside town in South East England on Wednesday, Harnden would only say that he "doesn't do any publicity. It's a really strict rule we have."

Such lack of self-promotion has not stopped Harnden from building a cult following with other retailers and designers who prize his artisanal, weathered-looking shoes and clothes. And the retailers who carry his designs play strictly by his rules. Both Dover Street Market, Comme des GarAs.ons multibrand emporium in London, and If Boutique in New York declined requests to lend out any merchandise for photography.

Rei Kawakubo started carrying Harnden's shoes in her Tokyo store more than 15 years ago. "We've always loved what he does," said Adrian Joffe, Kawakubo's husband and chief executive officer of Comme des GarAs.ons International. "It's beyond fashion, really. You wear his clothes and it's as if you've always had them.

"He does have a following, and it's not dissimilar to our customers," Joffe continued. "He's got a very strong signature, and we do really well with it."

Similarly, If Boutique owner Jeanette Bird has carried Harnden's work for about 10 years. "The strongest pieces are his jackets," she said, praising his washed fabrics with heavy cotton linings. "It has a lot of style without being flashy. It's laid back and very organic. Everything is natural...rugged looking. His shoes are especially amazing, completely handmade. His clothes attract people from the arts, people who don't want to wear anything that looks branded."

Harnden designs under the label Paul Harnden Shoemakers, reflecting his start in handmade footwear. He moved from Toronto to London in 1985 intent on learning to make lasts by hand. His work, which now includes, in addition to shoes, men's and women's clothes, leather goods and some quite whimsical scarves, remains handmade. The look is right out of "Oliver Twist," all distressed and artfully crumpled.

Harnden's marketing techniques or lack thereof are similarly old school. In an age when fashion labels are eager to broadcast their goings-on via Twitter and blogs, Harnden is hardly visible online. He has a bizarrely nonfunctional Web site. Most searches of his name bring up fashion forums, where his hard-core fans eagerly discuss where his pieces can be found.

" He does have a following, and it's not dissimilar to our customers. He's got a very strong signature, and we do really well with it."

Adrian Joffe, Comme des GarAs.ons International

Yet Harnden was not always so elusive. In 1987, the designer, then 27, sat for an interview with Footwear News, WWD's sister title. He compared his designs, such as an elongated Victorian style leather boot, to Giacometti sculptures.

"He liked doing long, skinny shapes, and so do I," Harnden commented. At the time, he said he sees making a shoe's last as more important than a shoe's upper. "If I experiment in design, it's with the last, not with the upper. I'm very into dynamic shapes with a lot of tension in the last. The uppers are usually very traditional."

Harnden, who trained at London's prestigious Cordwainers College before completing a year as an apprentice at the luxury British boot maker John Lobb, also said then that he used only British vegetable-tanned leather for his shoes.

Meanwhile, character sketches of the man are scarce. A person familiar with Harnden said: "He hasn't sold himself out, and he believes that producing exclusive, quality goods is all-important. He doesn't talk to the press. He is a very solitary character, and he has a small staff that works full-time for him. He has a huge business in Japan."

Bird described him as a "warm, interesting person. He plays music with groups and is involved in making underground movies," she said. "He's just doing what he really likes without any pressure from the fashion world."

CAPTION(S):

Paul Harnden Shoemakers fall 2010 wool and cotton blazer

Paul Harnden Shoemakers fall 2010 silk scarf.

Paul Harnden photographed for Footwear News in 1987.

By Samantha Conti

Edited by the shah - 1/10/13 at 5:46pm
post #18 of 139
perhaps our serpent was referring to this ?

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)





























post #19 of 139
Ideally it's just for books (or magazines), reviews good or bad, suggestions, questions, that kind of things... I think all the other stuff is at its right place in the designer thread. I mean, the way I see it this thread is more about the book as physical object, not about a specific interview or other stuff.


Maybe we should have a 'fashion articles+texts' thread. And a fashion ads thread.
post #20 of 139
Very good. Very elusive.


Can you do a review of this one ? With pictures and everything ?

post #21 of 139
Very good. Very elusive.


Can you do a review of this one ? With pictures and everything ?

post #22 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by sipang View Post

Very good. Very elusive.


Can you do a review of this one ? With pictures and everything ?

 

That's in our library. Not sure if I'll have time to read it now but I can probably do a few quick pictures at some point.

post #23 of 139
reviews forthcoming


ReFusing Fashion: Rei Kawakubo
Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo
Supermodernism


Black Paintings of Goya
Mies van der Rohe. Objetos y muebles
Comme Des Garcons (Universe of Fashion)


Rei Kawakubo and Commes des Garcons
Belgian Fashion Design
Yohji Yamamoto (Memoirs)


Japanese Fashion Designers: The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo
Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion
Modern Architecture Since 1900


Programs and Manifestoes on 20th-Century Architecture
Maison Martin Margiela
La Jetée: ciné-roman


Chris Marker: Memories of the Future
Non-Places: An Introduction to Supermodernity
The Red Book


Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life (Radical Thinkers)
Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin (Fotografie)
Stephen Shore: Uncommon Places


Ron Arad
Phenomenology of Perception
Masterpieces: Library Architecture + Design


BLESS: Retrospective Home N 30-N 41
Yohji Yamamoto
Yohji Yamamoto: My Dear Bomb


Fashion: Rei Kawakubo *not actual cover
Fashion: Yohji Yamamoto
Robert Capa: The Definitive Collection
Edited by the shah - 1/10/13 at 6:06pm
post #24 of 139
Lists with covers pics are no fun confused.gif


Needs more reviews, insights, what's inside ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by magicalporks View Post

That's in our library. Not sure if I'll have time to read it now but I can probably do a few quick pictures at some point.

That'd be great.
post #25 of 139
That kid's wear magazine is straight from my nightmares
post #26 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by sipang View Post

Lists with covers pics are no fun confused.gif
Needs more reviews, insights, what's inside ?

patience young grasshopper, i've yet to read most of them. it's a preliminary list of shah's reviews to come alien.gif
post #27 of 139
smile.gif


I saw the Kawakubo Taschen book today, those things are huge.


Mini-poster sized images, really nice. Haven't looked at the texts content but it's probably pretty light. Definitely worth it for the price though.



post #28 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by g transistor View Post

That kid's wear magazine is straight from my nightmares


Design wise or content wise ?
post #29 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by sipang View Post

smile.gif


I saw the Kawakubo Taschen book today, those things are huge.


Mini-poster sized images, really nice. Haven't looked at the texts content but it's probably pretty light. Definitely worth it for the price though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dantebykiko View Post

had chance to see the new book, nothing special to be honest. bigger in terms of dimension for what i expected.

1000


1000
post #30 of 139
They didn't have the Yohji one, I thought it looked great. Not groundbreaking or anything but seeing vintage pics you're used to look at in grainy shity 300x650 blown up on those big ass pages is pretty nice I think. For $30 it's decent.

Anyway, I picked up Pleats Please instead, review soonish.
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