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Tea Seta

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
My girlfriend drinks a lot of tea. At present, she's pretty casual about it, in the sense that she tends to use tea packets from the market in an everyday tumbler glass, etc. She is interested in becoming more "serious" about it, in part with an eye toward potentially developing and marketing her own brand. (Her background is in design/marketing generally as opposed to, say, tea manufacturing or import/export, for whatever that's worth.) I would like to get her a "good" tea set as a gift. I'm happy to pay appropriately for good quality and aesthetics, but don't feel any need to go overboard for exotica (say, china with ground rhino penis or whatever). I'm comfortable exercising my judgment on aesthetics but would welcome opinions on what other characteristics to look for (and why) in selecting a "good" tea set (composition, place of manufacture, etc.) and perhaps what sensible price points would be. Sourcing suggestions also welcome. I'm traveling a fair bit for work these days to the UK and China, so those are potenti options if necessary. But I'm assuming I don't need to go to those lengths and can opt for the convenience of something available in the States or over the Internet. (Feel free, of course, to disabuse me of that notion.)
Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
post #2 of 12
Bone china or sterling?
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Advantages of one or the other, aside from personal aesthetics?
post #4 of 12
Silver has germicidal effects, it's one of the reasons why it was used for silverware. Other than that I believe it comes down to preference.
post #5 of 12
If she prefers to drink green tea, there are some alternatives that have advantages. Of course, most teas from tea bags don't warrant any special tea set since they're mostly of mediocre or bad quality.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks, guys. Helpful observations. (She drinks mostly black or white teas, not green.)
post #7 of 12
Holy crap! I was looking at the main forum page, saw your user name, and couldn't believe it. Where you been hiding man?

Sorry, I don't know shit about tea. Wish I could help.
post #8 of 12
Try checking out the selection of tea pots at Mighty Leaf and 5 Mountains:

http://www.mightyleaf.com/teaware_teapot/

http://five-mountains.com/doublewallglasse.html

But really you should start by getting her some good loose leaf tea. I've been drinking Mighty Leaf for about a year now and they have some great teas. 5 mountains is also very good but very expensive.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by alex99 View Post

Try checking out the selection of tea pots at Mighty Leaf and 5 Mountains:

http://www.mightyleaf.com/teaware_teapot/

http://five-mountains.com/doublewallglasse.html

But really you should start by getting her some good loose leaf tea. I've been drinking Mighty Leaf for about a year now and they have some great teas. 5 mountains is also very good but very expensive.

bodum has some tea brewers http://www.bodum.com/us/en-us/shop/prodlist/272/

mighty leaf makes great bagged teas

for loose leaf check the closest natural foods store they normally have lots
post #10 of 12
Check out red blossom tea. Been wanting a set from there for awhile.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Went away mostly because it became clear you worthless a-holes don't know anything useful -- like about tea, for example.

Nah, just had a lot of transition and the like over the last year or so that got me out of the habit of checking in. Which means that I missed the opportunity for a grand "and in conclusion, F*** all of you" exit. All rights reserved, of course.

(This was meant as a reply to Rambo's post, obviously. My skilz have clearly atrophied.)
Edited by lawyerdad - 1/11/13 at 11:00am
post #12 of 12
If you want something that is of heirloom quality consider something such as a Georg Jenson sterling set of the era before his death. I'm not an expert on Jenson, but my understanding is that the pieces pre death are more highly sought after.

There are many notable mid century danish and american designers however that are worth collecting and I generally would chose something hand wrought over something mass produced. Ebony wood or ivory handles (before they were illegal) are also more highly sought after.

I personally get a little suspicious of the really old stuff, even though I enjoy many of the designs during the period of George III.

I like the really simple Arts and Crafts designers as well, such as Lebolt.
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