or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Menswear Fall-Winter 2013-14 (Mens Fashion Week - London, Milan, Paris)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Menswear Fall-Winter 2013-14 (Mens Fashion Week - London, Milan, Paris) - Page 15

post #211 of 273
I couldn't stop looking at SLP...really freaky. Hedi looked bad at the end. I notice there are more likes for that on Style.com than any other collection by far, but I guess that's because of the press. I bet it'll sell anyway. Maybe people want grunge again.

I contrast, i loved DH, very sharp, austere, and mature. I like the expert look, but wouldn't do the belt!

Balenciaga had some of the coolest jackets. Really great, but obviously short collection.
Edited by SirGrotius - 1/21/13 at 8:55am
post #212 of 273
All I could think was "why would someone pay several thousand dollars to look like Kurt Cobain?" But, at this point, it's hardly surprising what people will pay money for.
post #213 of 273
Hedi is a douche. His response to any criticism is to take his ball and go home. I can't think of anyone who contrasts more in spirit with all the music he claims to love and take inspiration from. What an ass.
post #214 of 273
Re: pulling advertising

What do you expect them to do? What would you do in that situation? To think that anyone who is in bed that much with advertising money is not going to be influenced by it is pretty naive.

I don't understand what people expected from Slimane? The links between his collections for YSL, DH and now SLP are strong and obvious. He isnt going to change his direction. They paid him to make sexy, slim clothing that was youthful and that they could sell for crazy markup and leverage fragrances / bags / money makers from.
post #215 of 273
In their situation, I probably would wait for the review before deciding to pursue an advertising relationship.

Just because the end result is unsurprising doesn't mean it's not worth deriding. That said, his work for SLP is worse than his work for Dior, which is something worth talking about – along with his absolutely insane way of managing business elements.
post #216 of 273
You are kidding right? Yes they brought him in to sell clothes. But they were u der the impressuon that he would use his design sense to make stuff that people would want to buy today. This look is old. It is a new day.. Dudes are not starving themselves anymore to look like this.
post #217 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyber7Punk View Post


"Boy-Safari" ?

I will not google this
post #218 of 273
Agree with your take on his clothes. Totally disagree about his response to criticism though. Saint Laurent is trying to punish anyone who even mildly criticizes Hedi. It's not like they're choosing not to advertise with a place that unnecessarily slams them. They're just being petty and vindictive. There's a difference. It's not the first time either.
http://www.businessoffashion.com/2012/10/a-wake-up-call-for-ysls-pr-team.html
post #219 of 273
Errr eating disorders in men are rising not falling? And so is body dysmorphia? I think people will be surprised about how much people will eat up Heidi's work, his fans are rabid and have never really been part of the demographic on SF.

We won't know how well it's selling for awhile. If you wanted a new look why the fuck would you get Heidi Slimane to do it?? Have you seen old YSL Rive Gauche shows? He bangs on the same drum forever and obviously that's what they wanted. They would have approved the shows anyway.

Brad, big fashion is like big radio, full of payola. It's to be expected. We live in a bubble free of they influence on SF, but read GQ or Esquire and it's glaringly obvious.
post #220 of 273
I'll say that on second glance, I'm starting to like the SLP collection a little more. There are a few pieces that I'd pick up, and it's so old school that it's almost different for me. I don't mind the whole waif thing, especially since he uses some thicker models, too.

There's only one opinion that matters on this collection though, and that's Karl Lagerfeld's. Let's wait to see what he has to say. I'm sure it'll be intense. smile.gif
post #221 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

Agree with your take on his clothes. Totally disagree about his response to criticism though. Saint Laurent is trying to punish anyone who even mildly criticizes Hedi. It's not like they're choosing not to advertise with a place that unnecessarily slams them. They're just being petty and vindictive. There's a difference. It's not the first time either.
http://www.businessoffashion.com/2012/10/a-wake-up-call-for-ysls-pr-team.html

Well would you spend money on advertising on a site that slams your products?

Yes / No?

I wouldn't, I'm not saying that Heidi isn't a dick (I don't and won't own any Heidi clothes) but honestly, the model is:

Fat Advertising Accounts = Playing Nice

If you want a proper critique, don't go to the person getting paid by the company who makes the product. This is the same for plenty of other industries, it's just a fact. Thinking that journalists swear some creed to remove all bias from thier holy scriptures is niave - the majority of them are beholden to thier benefactors, who are marketing departments usually.
post #222 of 273

YSL should be sending Style.com a bonus for Mr. Blanks' tact.  Instead of "stagnant" it was a "rock prototype." Ubiquitous and pedestrian? No, just present on "the funky end of any L.A. boulevard."  

Aside from the boring collection, I'm still trying to wrap my head around the "we're going to use our 60's branding for our new designer who was influential in the 00's to churn out a 90's aesthetic to move forward" logic.

 

And speaking of negative Style.com reviews, at least he didn't trash the whole house.

From Celine FW08:

"Celine is one of those minor-league labels that, in the absence of any fixed identity of its own, is destined to play along with the trends in order to keep up its claim to being a part of things." 

post #223 of 273
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Razele View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

Agree with your take on his clothes. Totally disagree about his response to criticism though. Saint Laurent is trying to punish anyone who even mildly criticizes Hedi. It's not like they're choosing not to advertise with a place that unnecessarily slams them. They're just being petty and vindictive. There's a difference. It's not the first time either.
http://www.businessoffashion.com/2012/10/a-wake-up-call-for-ysls-pr-team.html

Well would you spend money on advertising on a site that slams your products? Yes / No?

I wouldn't, I'm not saying that Heidi isn't a dick (I don't and won't own any Heidi clothes) but honestly, the model is: Fat Advertising Accounts = Playing Nice

If you want a proper critique, don't go to the person getting paid by the company who makes the product. This is the same for plenty of other industries, it's just a fact. Thinking that journalists swear some creed to remove all bias from thier holy scriptures is niave - the majority of them are beholden to thier benefactors, who are marketing departments usually.

I don't disagree with any of your main points, but you're playing the devil's advocate with a tad too much enthusiasm, because these things didn't need to be refuted.

Your hypothetical oversimplifies: even if on principle I don't do business with anyone who doesn't curry my favour, once I am in a business relationship with someone, it can only reflect poorly upon me to spastically sever that relationship over the first hiccup (read: criticism), regardless of whether it is faintly justifiable after the fact by a devil's advocate figure.

Furthermore, you can't call the consumer naive for going to a biased reviewer if that reviewer is the only one. "If you want a proper critique, don't go to the person getting paid by the company who makes the product" is a fair statement, but these are the primary source of reviews and information about the new collections. Where else is anyone supposed to go?

And his name is Hedi like Eddie, not Heidi like Shirley Temple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by futuresailors View Post

"Celine is one of those minor-league labels that, in the absence of any fixed identity of its own, is destined to play along with the trends in order to keep up its claim to being a part of things."

This is horribly meaningless. Sometimes all that matters is what side of the bed they woke up on; they certainly fall over themselves lauding all kinds of crap from the big name labels. The result is a really strange feeling whenever you read the one review each year with teeth, like that of Saint Laurent above.
post #224 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Razele View Post

Well would you spend money on advertising on a site that slams your products?

Yes / No?

I wouldn't, I'm not saying that Heidi isn't a dick (I don't and won't own any Heidi clothes) but honestly, the model is:

Fat Advertising Accounts = Playing Nice

If you want a proper critique, don't go to the person getting paid by the company who makes the product. This is the same for plenty of other industries, it's just a fact. Thinking that journalists swear some creed to remove all bias from thier holy scriptures is niave - the majority of them are beholden to thier benefactors, who are marketing departments usually.

That's actually a very outmoded way of thinking, and one of the reasons that communities and more "impartial" magazines are getting more and more advertising dollars, and agencies and brands are looking at all sorts of new ways to capture and retain the attention of a very demanding audience. If a website or a print periodical gets a reputation as being a mouthpiece for any brand, it loses its potency and relevance. Brands want to advertise in places that people find relevant, and engage with the public in a positive way. PR firms that don't get this either have some secret voodoo that we'll all see in 5 years, or they are just dated and unable to keep up with changing technology. A lot of them are scared of losing control. Truth is that in a world where information is quickly desseminated, and anyone can be the conduit, you don't have control of anything but your own actions anyway. I think that the reaction to the ultimatums passed down by the SL pr team should be a wake up call to them and to everyone else.
post #225 of 273
The automotive industry is probably the biggest culprit.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Menswear Fall-Winter 2013-14 (Mens Fashion Week - London, Milan, Paris)