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Living in miami - Page 2

post #16 of 37

something I've always wondered about Miami; since there are so many models there, would it be easy to get with one as a commoner(not famous, not super rich)?

post #17 of 37
should you now change your name, ed?
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LooksGood View Post

something I've always wondered about Miami; since there are so many models there, would it be easy to get with one as a commoner(not famous, not super rich)?

models are a commodity. either you have what it takes (looks, money, access, drugs, etc.) or you don't. the amount of them living here does not change their desirability.
post #19 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrG View Post

It has all of the problems Atlanta has, plus, the weather is horrible most of the year, and it's packed with old people.

You could probably enjoy it for a while, Ed, but I don't know if you'd want to stay once you settle down.

CoL is higher than Atlanta, especially for housing. Though Rambo's right, it's not outrageous for a big city.

Here's my response to those points.

Having been born and raised in Atlanta, other than some time in NYC and Australia, the "problems" of Atlanta are normal to me and I really don't mind them. I love the heat and humidity. When it was 110 in July I went for a run. Was so happy. I'm usually in bed by 9 if not asleep at 930 most nights so I practically am old. As to CoL, I have a feeling no state income tax might help things a tad.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gambit50 View Post

^^^
There are many, many deep faults but what is better about the ATL than the MIA?

Weather
Beaches
Better boxing gyms
More Catholics
Cigar culture
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidboy View Post

should you now change your name, ed?

Haven't moved yet, idiot.
post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by edinatlanta View Post

Here's my response to those points.

Having been born and raised in Atlanta, other than some time in NYC and Australia, the "problems" of Atlanta are normal to me and I really don't mind them. I love the heat and humidity. When it was 110 in July I went for a run. Was so happy. I'm usually in bed by 9 if not asleep at 930 most nights so I practically am old. As to CoL, I have a feeling no state income tax might help things a tad.
..

Dude, speaking as someone who has lived both places, I can tell you that Atlanta humidity =/= Florida humidity. It gets considerably hotter in Atlanta, yes, but Florida humidity is in a class all its own, especially down there next to the Everglades. The extreme heat we get here is also a dry heat - when it gets hot here the air dries out - so comparing that to Florida's humidity isn't really a good comparison. To put it into perspective, both times I've moved to Georgia from Florida, I've marveled at how much less humid it is in Georgia. Even after spending most of the last decade adapting to the drier Georgia climate, I still chuckle when people talk about how humid it is here.

Also, I wasn't so much talking about humidity when I mentioned the weather down there. When I talk about the weather, I'm more talking about the fact that it's hot 9-10 months a year, and the "seasons" amount to: hot, hot with daily rain, hot, and mostly pleasant. Don't get me wrong - I actually often miss the thick-air humidity, but I don't miss what basically amounted to homogeneous weather year-round.

WRT CoL, the state income tax difference isn't as substantial as you might think. You'll take home a bit more in each paycheck, but it's not enormous, and it's mostly absorbed elsewhere (Florida property taxes, for example, are outlandish there relative to Georgia). I remember thinking we'd lose a fair bit of income to the income tax when we moved up, but it really isn't significant.
post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by edinatlanta View Post

I love the heat and humidity. When it was 110 in July I went for a run.

I'm a northern transplant who's lived in central Florida for about 25 years. I'm athletic and run about 12-20K a week (depending). I'm also somebody who sweats super easy (and I'm as pale a cracker as you'll find).

You didn't say how far you ran, but unless you're superman, you are not running in 110 in Florida. Actually, here we only get up to about 102-103, but humidity can be 85%+, even when temps are "only" 85-95'ish. You will die just trying to run 3 miles. No joke, people pass out and have heart-attacks.. I bust my arse just to safely get 10-12K in a week during our killer june-august span. August especially is brutal. During those times, I'm fond of saying "it's not how far you run, it's how long you survive"

Dry heat is easy - you can escape it by shielding from it. High heat and humidity is like a sauna. And, just for comparison, I've 10 hour hiked the grand canyon to the bottom and out (south rim) when it was 100+ on the surface and 135+ down in the canyon with zero humidity - no prob.
post #22 of 37
I always tell people its not the heat, but the humidity.
post #23 of 37
I've lived here for about 3 years and while I enjoy much of what Florida has to offer, it's not my ideal place to live. The weather is highly overrated. As mentioned above, there's 1 season, it rains all the time and it's miserably hot most of the year. I'll eventually relocate down the road, the weather being a factor in that decision.

Of course you have pretty good nightlife, shopping, beaches, lots of beautiful women, ample job opportunities (although i wouldn't call the job market "great"), and a few months of what I would consider pretty decent weather.
post #24 of 37
As a counterpoint, its currently 80 degrees. In the middle of January. Anyone who wants to bitch about the heat can suck on that. Beats freezing your dick off in some northern hellhole.
post #25 of 37
Thread Starter 
I like humidity. Like, I've spent extended periods of time in equatorial outposts at the height of summer. Loved every second. (Just for...something I guess... In the summer I drive windows up, no AC. Don't ask me why. But just to give an idea of my tolerance or whatever...there you go.)
post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

As a counterpoint, its currently 80 degrees. In the middle of January. Anyone who wants to bitch about the heat can suck on that. Beats freezing your dick off in some northern hellhole.

80 isn't bad as long as it's not humid, although I like 70 better. The one nice thing about the heat are the nights and early mornings in the winter. I can go outside at 10pm or 7am in shorts and a t-shirt.
post #27 of 37
its going to be 65 in nyc this weekend, u mad?
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post


models are a commodity. either you have what it takes (looks, money, access, drugs, etc.) or you don't. the amount of them living here does not change their desirability.


No that's what I'm saying though, like if an average looking guy with average talk game made 200k in NYC, he isn't getting any models.  But put that guy in Miami, where people make much less, he WOULD have what it takes, no?

post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LooksGood View Post


No that's what I'm saying though, like if an average looking guy with average talk game made 200k in NYC, he isn't getting any models.  But put that guy in Miami, where people make much less, he WOULD have what it takes, no?

not necessarily. because NYC $200k is more or less equal to our $150k and I'm sure there are plenty of people pulling that down. down here, its more about image and the appearance of money. style really doesn't factor into it much for men. miami has abysmal men's style.
post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidboy View Post

should you now change your name, ed?

damn, you beat me to it
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