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NPR: Why Black Men Tend To Be Fashion Kings - Page 5

post #61 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimelesStyle View Post

I think you misunderstood what I was saying, particularly about a causal relationship. I said one may or may not exist, that I have no idea, but I simply observed that I see fewer whites wearing Gucci or Coach (or True Religion for that matter, one I'd previously omitted) and more blacks wearing said labels. Who knows what, if any, relationship exists. I highly doubt it's blacks "getting too close," and more likely a question of marketing. Consumers are fickle creatures and one of the best things marketers can do is find a new demographic to go after when a core demographic starts to lose interest. True Religion is a perfect example. Won't ever have much staying power anywhere but might as well try to find a new group of customers when the original target audience loses interest.

Finally, I'll be the first to admit that my observations (not beliefs, biases, predispositions or assumptions) may not be representative of the population at large. And it wasn't even really a question of hierarchy of consumers, rather it was more about a contrast in where I observed different types of trends (style vs. label) appear to originate and perpetuate. Was not meant to be a broad generalization.

Some time during the 80s, Coach cut back production for it's saddle leather products (the good stuff). Up until then, Coach was sold mostly in high end department stores and luggage stores. Coach start selling lower quality goods covered with the Coach logo. Coach made their bags more available and put millions into ads. Many upper income whites retreated from Gucci, Coach, etc. But middle income and lower income whites brought any and everything made by Coach and even fake Coach bags.
post #62 of 65

I cannot believe I just discovered this thread.

post #63 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigtimebuck4 View Post

I work for a high end retailer everyone here has been to. My job requires me to focus almost entirely on "classic menswear." However, we have seen an increase in african american clients, largely because we sell Gucci, Louis Vitton, Chanel, etc... However, I think the issue is much more complicated than race. It is more about socio-economic culture. Our urban clients who are only interested buying these labels regardless of quality / value are predominantly african american, however not exclusively. There are white customers from the same culture with the same tastes (they tend to be mono-chromatic, and avoid mixing brands in an ensemble). 

Conversely, our core clientele are professional businessmen and are largely white / asian. However, there are also african american professionals which have the same tastes as their white counterparts whom they share a socio-economic culture. It is more about your culture, who you associate with, what your norms are, than simply race. 

My style preferences are consistent with most of the people on this board, and I would never be caught dead wearing blue Gucci products head to toe. That is because it isn't the norm for my culture. It doesn't mean my culture is superior, even if it is more established, it's simply different. I appreciate the fact our urban customer puts much effort into their appearance as opposed to the "business-casual" corporate drones. 

Just my two cents.

Out of curiosity, what city are you in? Assuming you work in a Neiman Marcus?
post #64 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimelesStyle View Post


Out of curiosity, what city are you in? Assuming you work in a Neiman Marcus?

 

I don't want to out myself, but i work for one of Neiman's competitors in the midwest. Why?


Edited by bigtimebuck4 - 1/31/13 at 6:22pm
post #65 of 65
I saw this feature some time back, and own the "Black Dandies" book. I actually found the men high lighted to be amusingly dressed but for some reason Black Academia seems to be ripe with folks wearing bow ties in unfortunate ways. I do think Black folk tend take clothing more seriously than whites and are willing to spend more money and time achieving whatever look they like, however good or bad looking it is. I actually think it is almost pan ethnic in regards to the black race and not quite always a good thing. It is likely somewhat motivated by the fact that blacks are frequently viewed as the low end of the totem pole socially, globally and many times (and sometimes misguidedly) affect whatever trapping of wealth that are attainable to us and easily viewed by others. Personally I dress in a very understated manner(shetland,cords, oxford) tho occasionally I do worry it gives off the image the imagine that I'm assimilated to attempted to. Fortunately most folks tend to just call me Bill Cosby.
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