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Properly constructed plain front/french placket on shirts

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Dear fellow SFers,

I read an articel or forum post of Alex Kabbaz a few days ago, saddly can't find it right now, which said that in RTW shirts a french placket was cheaper to make than a placket front.
Mr. Kabbaz said In custom shirts it would be the other way around.
Could anybody of you explain to me the logic behind this?
What techniques and construction details does it take a plain placket to be considered to be made properly?
post #2 of 5
Thread Starter 
I found this post of Mr. Kabbaz at AAAC
http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?83278-flat-front-or-placket-on-dress-shirt&p=768530#post768530

Can anybody explain what he means with the interlining?
post #3 of 5
no clue as to what he is getting at. since i am not bothering to find the article

most shirts have a very thin layer of lining between two -3 layers of fabric.
this to support the buttonholes.
some makers forgo this lining and turn the fabric twice so there are three layers of fabric..
this creates a lighter weight front. i have seen some Italian shirts made this way.
when they use very lightweight fabric, I find it hard to button.

he might be referring to matching stripes.
post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
Thank you a lot Carl!

What are "two -3 layers of fabric"?
Do I understand correctly, that for you the only right choice is to add interlining instead of turning the fabric around twice?
On my french front shirt the fabric is folded to the inside and attached by the button holes, one can see the selvedge which is sign of poor workmansship, right?
Rather it should look like this

Black being the shirt's fabric folded inside around a piece of blue interlining and then the three layers should be attached by the button holes, right?

Also I fail to find the original comment of Mr. Kabbaz I am referring to but other comments of his which essentially say the same thing:
http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?51193-Properly-Constructed-Plain-Front-Shirts&p=313171#post313171
post #5 of 5
some rtw shirts take one full turn and then just a 1/4" where it is attached to the lining.
some turn twice with or with outlining depending on the weight of the fabric.
non-iron shirts have a fused front
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