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Chicago's Finest? - Page 6

post #76 of 82
The inner workings of the LE community are not what the average citizen thinks.
I can tell you that a vast majority of LE personnel I have encountered were drawn to the job by a genuine desire to help society. They learned that law enforcement isn't what it seems on TV, nor is it what it seems to the average citizen. They still have the highest ideals and try their best to perform their duties as wisely and fairly as any human being can. These officers would rather starve than be corrupt. That said, yes sometimes a career in law enforcement attracts an individual with a bully mentality or one looking for any "easy way". I have seen that a time or two and it is never a pretty sight. I can also tell you that in most departments they get weeded out. Sometimes it takes time for the tendencies to manifest and then there are union and other concerns that must be addressed but they do get weeded out. That said, community politics have a great deal to do with the overall policies of the force in general. Some jurisdictions like a police force that is more agressive while other communities have a much more service oriented force.
I have not had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of any of the Chicago department and it seems clear that they have some issues but I do know several officers from larger cities and I know the difficulties they deal with. A vast majority of the citizens are decent enough, law abiding people and the only contact they usually have with the department is the occasional traffic citation, crowd control at parades and if they are unfortunate enough to have been the victim of a crime. The LE personnel, on the other hand, deal daily with the dregs of society who do consider the police as the enemy. The things that a large department sees regularly do tend to make veteran officers jaded and seem somewhat callous. A certain comraderie developes in any department by virtue of that fact. An officer responding to a D&D call finding upon investigation that the disorderly is a fellow officer will tend to be more understanding. He may thing back to the day he had to scrape what was left of a seven year old who was high off of the sidewalk after the drugs the kid was on made the kid think he could fly and how he (the officer) felt he needed a drink when he got off duty. The officer might remember the day he was sick after seeing the remains of a car wreck that left a family in such a condition that it was impossible to tell how many people were in the car.
An unfortunate truth is that in the larger departments a culture of "us versus them" tends to develop.

Smaller jurisdictions have different issues, perhaps another time.
post #77 of 82
Buickguy,
+100. Well said. It appears I am not the only person that shares this opinion.

JB
post #78 of 82
Thread Starter 
http://www.cnn.com/2007/LAW/05/16/po....ap/index.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnn
A police officer pleaded not guilty Wednesday to beating a female bartender, and to threatening to arrest bar employees in a failed attempt to suppress a video of the attack that has been viewed around the world. In a brief hearing, Anthony Abbate's attorney entered not guilty pleas to all 15 felony counts of aggravated battery, official misconduct, intimidation, conspiracy and communicating with a witness. "He's pleading not guilty because he is not guilty," Peter Hickey said after the hearing. "And we expect at the end, the conclusion of the trial, that that's what the outcome will be."
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnn
The indictment alleges that Abbate, using a woman as an intermediary, threatened to plant drugs on bar employees and arrest customers for drunken driving if the video was turned over to authorities.
Very classy.
post #79 of 82
Man, I thought this thread was dead a while ago.

JB
post #80 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by drizzt3117 View Post

That is what happens when you teach police to act on-duty as if they were Nazis in an occupied country. High school drop-out with government-mandated authority is a very dangerous thing.
I would not support or cooperate with most of them as 90% of my encounters with Police left me with impression that I am guilty of just being alive. Rude, obnoxious, retards with guns.
post #81 of 82
post #82 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

It takes a village.

Heard about it on the radio a couple days ago. Thought there must be more to the story, because it sounded too ridiculous, even for Chicago. Apparently, there's not.

Former Mayor Daley's nephew was involved (and by "was involved" i mean "killed the dude") in a similar incident. Of course it took a decade and a new mayor to be resolved.
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2014-02-01/news/chi-koschman-vanecko-20140131_1_vanecko-u-s-attorney-dan-webb-nanci-koschman

I remember walking to class as an undergrad one morning and watching someone on a bicycle get hit by a car. I dropped my books and rushed over to help. Only after I got the dude on his feet did a couple more bystanders wander over to check on him.
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