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Growing Rape Scandal at UVA - Page 7

post #91 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

If there were going to be a man rape that's exactly the kind of guy who would be man raped by a woman.

I didn't want to say it...
post #92 of 175
I guess it's impossible to say without having been there myself, and a lot would depend on exactly what happened, but I can't imagine being that distraught over being raped by a woman. I mean, was he a child? Did she stick things up his ass? Did she threaten him with a weapon? If it's one of those, then ok, I can see it. But I'm imagining something like the scene in the last season of Louie where the chick forces him to go down on her in her car. I would be pissed off, but I can't see having a panic attack over it 8 years later.
post #93 of 175
The only time I think of woman-on-man-rape is a scene from a terrible made for TV movie from 1991 called the Haunted. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Haunted_(1991_film)

It's "a true story" about a haunted house that's actually not too far from where I live. In the made for TV movie the husband gets raped by a female ghost. I always just assumed that the husband was beating off on the living room floor, came, passed out, and then the family comes home from McDonalds to see Daddy sprawled out on the carpet with his softened junk in his hand and he had to come up with a lie really quick so he claims he was ghost-woman-raped.

Actually I'm not sure why I thought of that, but whatever.

EDIT - Here's the ghost-rape scene. Probably NSFW although it was broadcast on regular TV back then.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OSIxx6cgFM

Also love the Youtube comments -
Quote:
He was asking for it, prancing around the house with his flannel shirt unbuttoned like that. What did he expect the ghost to do? :P
Quote:
Where can I find this documentary?
Quote:
She starts out hot but then she turns into a hambeast. Yeah, I'd have screamed too.
Quote:
this happens to lots of us. it happened......to me. my druggs started wearing off. it was worse then any guy on girl rape in any movie i've ever scene. i had to pretend like it was all cool. it was horrible. she was so fat and mexican. .im sorry. i have to go take a shower. say some hail mary's for me.


Stay classy, youtube.
post #94 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

If there were going to be a man rape that's exactly the kind of guy who would be man raped by a woman.

Yeah, pretty much.
post #95 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saigonesque View Post

In the past ten years at UVa, not a single student has been suspended or expelled for sexual assault, despite its prevalence in college campuses. In a 1995 survey, one in five college students report having been raped at some point in their lives. "In a typical academic year, 3% of college women report surviving rape or attempted rape." (http://www.oneinfourusa.org/statistics.php)
While it's possible the woman in question may be hypersensitive to perceived hostility over the whole process, can you blame her? There is a huge institutional bias at UVa; the system is broken. In fact, UVa is currently undergoing investigation by the Department of Education for problems in its sexual misconduct policy. She may be overzealous in her criticism of everyone involved, but that isn't necessarily because she "went home with a 10 at 2 and woke up with a 2 at 10." Maybe it's because she simply didn't feel safe in an institution with known problems addressing sexual assault.

That's really not telling the whole story.

1. How many have been prosecuted for rape in UVA during that time period?
2. Consider that if someone is actually charged for rape they don't often have to be expelled because they drop out because the college fund now turns into a defense fund.
post #96 of 175
I was kidding in my original post on man-rape as I think ti's just as valid for a guy to slam on the brakes as a woman.
post #97 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I was kidding in my original post on man-rape as I think ti's just as valid for a guy to slam on the brakes as a woman.

Well, I don't think men slam on the brakes nearly as often as women do. It does happen, but at the same time I seriously doubt that most women have the physical strength to overcome a man. Maybe Conne could shed some light on that.
post #98 of 175
An editorial exploring the preponderance burden of proof in a college sex crimes case:

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303615304579157900127017212

Apparently while living together and sleeping in the same bed, the woman awakes to find him doing something to her... He denies it was anything nonconsensual. Grand jury refuses to indict. School proceeds with expulsion. The editorialist gets a copy of the audio recording...
Quote:
The most striking quality of the 99-minute proceeding is its abject lack of professionalism. Imagine a courtroom with a jury and witnesses, but no judge or lawyers. Mr. Strange and his accuser had lawyers present—the only people in the room with legal training—but they were forbidden to speak except to identify themselves at the outset.

Presiding was an Auburn librarian, Tim Dodge, the committee's chairman. The other members were two students, a staffer from the College of Liberal Arts and a fisheries professor from the Agriculture College. Mr. Dodge was confused and hesitant throughout. At one point he got lost and admitted: "I can't find the script here." On multiple occasions an unidentified voice—Mr. Strange believes it is Mr. Frye—can be heard on the recording whispering stage directions to Mr. Dodge.

The absence of a judge to control the proceedings left Mr. Dodge anxious for authoritative guidance. It was provided by the two Auburn administrators the accuser called as witnesses. First up was Susan McCallister, an associate director with the campus police who doubles as a "safe-harbor advocate," a concierge for purported sex-crime victims. "Any kind of services that they need access to, we provide a doorway," she explained. Such services include counseling, "academic accommodations" and help in filing police reports.

At the hearing, Ms. McCallister proclaimed the accuser "very credible" and attested to the belief that Mr. Strange was "a potential threat to [the accuser's] safety." But Ms. McCallister disavowed knowledge even of the accuser's version of events. "As a safe-harbor advocate, I really don't need to know a lot of details, and so I didn't ask her to go into great detail," Ms. McCallister said. "I don't really want survivors to have to tell their story over and over again."

Ms. McCallister had referred the accuser to Kelley Taylor, the university's sex-discrimination enforcer and the accuser's second witness. Ms. Taylor also described the accuser as "credible" and added that she found the allegation "very compelling."

Mr. Dodge asked Ms. Taylor to describe "typical behaviors" of "somebody who may have undergone a sexual assault." She listed three. First, "they frequently cry." Second, "their storytelling is sometimes disjointed, sometimes not." Third, "there's often a lot of emotion inserted into the story that is about being very upset or in disbelief or unsure what to do next, petrified."

...

The university flaunted its contempt for the defendant's right to confront his accuser. According to Mr. Strange, a curtain was hung in the hearing room to shield her from his view. And although the panelists were permitted to question witnesses, there was no cross-examination.

...

With criminal charges pending, Mr. Strange chose not to testify at the university proceeding. Auburn bylaws stipulate that "failure of the student [charged with an offense] to make a statement or to answer any or all questions shall not be considered in the determinate on [sic] of guilt or innocence." Yet Mr. Dodge and the other panelists raised no objection when the accuser, in her closing statement, emphasized that Mr. Strange "never talked about the facts of this case."

Although that statement seems improper, it was consistent with the logic of the proceeding. The preponderance-of-evidence standard enfeebles the right to remain silent. In a she-said-he-said case, the adversaries start on equal footing, so that some shred of additional evidence is necessary to convict. But when it's she-said-he-kept-silent, she begins with an overwhelming evidentiary advantage. In a federal civil lawsuit, which uses the same standard, jurors are permitted to draw adverse inferences from a defendant's refusal to testify.

Can't make this stuff up.
post #99 of 175
Quote:
Mr. Dodge asked Ms. Taylor to describe "typical behaviors" of "somebody who may have undergone a sexual assault." She listed three. First, "they frequently cry." Second, "their storytelling is sometimes disjointed, sometimes not." Third, "there's often a lot of emotion inserted into the story that is about being very upset or in disbelief or unsure what to do next, petrified."

Well, then that settles it . You can't argue with science.
post #100 of 175
That kind of testimony is not unprecedented even in real courts, unfortunately. Usually it's in the context of child sex abuse cases, where a supposed expert testifies that normal people don't know what it looks like when a child is telling the truth, therefore they need someone to explain it to them. Of course they're not allowed to testify whether the kid is actually telling the truth, just whether the kid's story and actions are consistent with it. If that makes your eyes roll, it should.

But at least there's the right to counsel and cross-examination, as well as instruction from a judge (not a librarian) on the proper way to consider the testimony. And a jury of your peers instead of a bunch of pinkos from a university faculty.
post #101 of 175
Not to mention, if a supposed expert got on the stand in a sex abuse case and said "sometimes they cry, and they are either confused or they aren't" then I would ask for a mistrial.
post #102 of 175
Looks like the rape crises arent just happening at the universities

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/12/10/first-grade-kiss-suspension/3963813/
post #103 of 175
She sounds like a shitty parent.
He sounds like a shitty kid.
Sexual harassment is silly.
post #104 of 175
Rather than start a new thread, I just thought I'd bump this one up.

I know nothing about this UVA business save what I just read in this thread. However, I have been hearing a lot of late about this claim that 20% of young women in college get raped. This is an incomparably greater rate of rapes than even in our most crime-infested cities. All in all, I find such a figure quite literally incredible. It has been over 40 years since I was last involved in American higher education. However, I have known quite a few people who have had daughters in college more recently. As far as I know, none were raped.

I know I am notorious for "misogyny" in this forum, but I can't help thinking that a large percentage of these "rapes" are simply cases of young women ruing their misconduct when they were doped up or drunk.
post #105 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Rather than start a new thread, I just thought I'd bump this one up.

I know nothing about this UVA business save what I just read in this thread. However, I have been hearing a lot of late about this claim that 20% of young women in college get raped. This is an incomparably greater rate of rapes than even in our most crime-infested cities. All in all, I find such a figure quite literally incredible. It has been over 40 years since I was last involved in American higher education. However, I have known quite a few people who have had daughters in college more recently. As far as I know, none were raped.

I know I am notorious for "misogyny" in this forum, but I can't help thinking that a large percentage of these "rapes" are simply cases of young women ruing their misconduct when they were doped up or drunk.

It's based on surveys that ask things like "have you ever had sex when you were drunk?" or "have you ever had anyone use social pressure to get you to have sex with them?" and counts all of those as rapes.
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