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Growing Rape Scandal at UVA - Page 2

post #16 of 175
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Do you feel that the beyond a reasonable doubt standard is too high in all criminal cases, or just in rape cases?

Did you see me comment on the local DA declining to prosecute?
post #17 of 175
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post

I don't get the sitting for ten hours a foot away from the rapist thing. I get that people are naturally sheep, but why wouldn't she just walk out? If the UVA administrators confined her somehow, they will be paying an assload of money in a civil suit.
Anyway, until Nancy Grace weighs in (after UVA officials accidentally leak a few of the rapists' identities), all we're doing is just idle speculation.

It was during a hearing. Is she supposed to go 'welp fuck this, time to bail'? I mean, isn't it a bit much to expect her to do that?
post #18 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

Did you see me comment on the local DA declining to prosecute?

No, but this strikes me as shopping for a forum in which she feels she can get the satisfaction not afforded to her in more established, rigorous environments.
post #19 of 175
Teger is perfect for the world of academia.
post #20 of 175
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

No, but this strikes me as shopping for a forum in which she feels she can get the satisfaction not afforded to her in more established, rigorous environments.

Here's the post that the article is citing:

Judge for yourself.
Quote:
“This was a very difficult case. Ms. X provides a very compelling and believable account of the events and has clearly been affected by this incident. Mr. Y, your behavior was crass and disrespectful but this panel could not come to a unanimous conclusion that the policy had been violated in this instance. That said, this panel urges you, Mr. Y, to evaluate your actions and your treatment of women in the future. We would strongly suggest that you consider counseling around the issue of consent and respecting the wishes of your sexual partners. The panel wishes Ms. X well as she continues to work through the trauma that this incident has clearly caused.

These are the words that Dean E. read out loud at the conclusion of a grueling ten-hour hearing in which I had to single-handedly defend my case against the person who had drugged and raped me last December.

He offered me a beer during a club meeting on Grounds. The next thing I knew, I woke up on a bed in a sun-lit room, naked, in pain, next to him. I rushed out of the apartment as quickly as I could, even though I had no idea where I was. I spent the day confused, sinking deeper and deeper into depression, mercilessly blaming myself for putting myself in such a vulnerable position. I got home, ripped my clothes off and took an hour long shower, scrubbing my body down to the bone, cleaning any remaining semen I had on me. However, no matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t feel clean. I could only look at myself in the mirror in disgust, seeing him on top of me. I tried getting through the remainder of the day as though nothing had happened. It wasn’t so simple. Something in me had changed, and I didn’t know how to deal with it. Suicidal thoughts constantly crossed my mind. In one day, I had morphed from a cheery and carefree girl into an empty shell whose life had become a nightmare. By the end of the day, I was unable to keep the pain to myself and broke down in tears as I recounted the few memories I had of the night to two of my closest friends. I remember crumbling onto the floor as I realized that I had been raped.

One of my professors contacted the Dean of Students office. I went there with my parents and was encouraged not to officially report the rape, but rather to go through mediation with the rapist. I refused. The sole idea of his sight and of his voice sickened me. Dean E. further added that no one had been expelled for rape in over ten years. How could this be possible, when the statistics are that 1 in 4 women are sexually assaulted in college?

I went to the Martha Jefferson Hospital for pregnancy and STD tests. The examination triggered hidden yet vivid memories. It felt like I was going through the whole experience once again, processing the images my brain had suppressed. I began to piece the events of the night together.

A week after the rape, I gathered enough courage to file a complaint with the police. They took me to the UVA Hospital for a forensic examination. My complaint was dropped within a week, before the prosecution even looked at my forensic examination report. It took them two months to tell me that I did not have sufficient evidence. Apparently in Charlottesville, a woman has to be unconscious and carried back to a man’s place for non-consensual sex to be proved.

“It was just bad sex”, the prosecutor said. I was devastated.

Dean E. had been in contact with me as the new semester began, encouraging me to file a complaint with the school and insisting that the standard of proof, based on “preponderance of evidence”, was much lower than before thanks to the new sexual misconduct rules signed by President Sullivan in July 2011. Although I desperately wanted to move on and to forget all about my traumatic experience, I knew I had to file a complaint in the hope of removing a rapist from our beloved community. Weeks of investigation conducted by the Office of the Vice-President of Student affairs along with interviews with witnesses followed. I later found out that the entire investigation was skewed as the rapist’s defense attorney was monitoring it all along, behind my back. Dean C., my advisor, constantly repeated “We cannot punish someone for being a jerk”. The investigators tried to make me feel sorry for him by insisting how “sad” he had looked when they interviewed him, and how he “couldn’t sleep” at night because he was so disturbed by my accusations. This infuriated me. It didn’t matter to them that every day of my life had become a constant struggle. After my rape, it took me two weeks to be able to eat again, and another month to fall asleep at night. I couldn’t go to the bathroom for the entire day following the assault because it hurt so much. Regular panic attacks plagued me for months and still do from time to time. I forgot how to interact with my friends because nothing seemed important to me anymore. I couldn’t concentrate in class, and my grades began to suffer. Even now, nearly a year after the traumatic events, I still have violent nightmares. I have stayed at UVA because of my friends and professors who have shown me kindness and support. They are the UVA that I love, that has kept me in school.

Finally, four months after the worst day of my life, I was granted a hearing. However, before the hearing, a pre-hearing was to take place. No one had prepared me for it. The day before, my advisor, Dean C., told me that both the rapist and I had to present our evidence and that Dean E. would ultimately decide which evidence would be presented to the panel at the hearing. Dean E., the rapist and I sat together in a small conference room in Peabody Hall. It was the first time I had seen him since the rape. Suddenly, I forgot how to breathe and how to speak and I could barely restrain myself from running out of the room. What had happened before happened once again: he was the dominant figure and I could barely defend myself. Before I knew it, most of my evidence, like he had been accused of drugging others, was deemed “prejudicial” against him and was ruled out as evidence for the hearing. I tried maintaining my composure until I left Peabody Hall, but inside, I felt defeated, helpless and defenseless.

The hearing was held in the same room as the pre-hearing, where I sat diagonally across the rapist, just a few feet away from him. I could feel his glare on me every time I spoke, and I could see him smirk the few times I dared glance his way. I was sworn in on my honor at the beginning of the hearing while the rapist wasn’t. I spent ten hours answering the most invasive and humiliating questions from a panel who questioned every one of my statements. Had I ever had “visions” before? Was I on medication? Was I romantically interested in him? Did I say “no” forcefully enough for him to understand? Did it hurt because it was my first sexual experience? On the other hand, the rapist’s testimony was barely questioned. No one was interested in the fact that he contradicted himself and lied multiple times during the hearing. He was shamelessly callous, arrogant, disrespectful and remorseless, as if he already knew the outcome. None of my witnesses’ statements seemed to bear any weight against his word. Moreover, I had no form of support in the hearing despite the fact I had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), of which Dean E. was very well aware.

When Dean E. read out the verdict, I ran out of the room, sobbing uncontrollably like never before, and hid under a desk, wishing I could just die there. My own school, that I loved so much, failed to protect me. I had never felt so betrayed and let down in my life. The deans said that the hearing was supposed to be “therapeutic” as I faced the rapist. They said that they believed me. They said that UVA was my home and that it loved me. Yet, how could they believe me and let him go completely unpunished? How could they uphold an Honor Code and expel students for cheating, lying and stealing while letting rapists stay in the University? How could UVA ever be my home after what it had done to me? I didn’t want anything to do with it anymore. The only reason I pulled myself together and pushed through the semester was out of the little dignity and pride I had left within me and of the incredible support I got from my family, friends and the academic faculty.

My parents appealed the outcome of the hearing but, despite documentary evidence that the forensic nurse had changed her findings from her initial report that I had physical damage to nothing had happened to me in her lay report to the Panel, the decision was upheld. I later found out that this same nurse is the Chair of the Sexual Misconduct Advisory Committee and she is also the wife of the Deputy Commonwealth Attorney. Furthermore a second medical examination confirmed the damage was more than the nurse’s initial report. How can I have faith in an institution that engages in such deceitful conduct?

Today, as I write this, the rapist is still a student here and has ironically been rewarded with a teaching assistant’s position while I have struggled to stay in school and hold my life together.

The only reason I am sharing this is because I read Angie Epifano’s account of the way Amherst College treated her rape. She, like me, was raped and Amherst did nothing, even going so far as to try and suppress her from complaining. Angie’s courage has inspired me to share my story. A few days ago, all UVA students received an email from the Office of Civil Rights in D.C., asking us to share our experience with sexual assault and harassment at UVA by November 9, 2012, at this email address: OCRDCTitleIX@ed.gov. I contacted the OCR. Even though it might seem scary to share such painful memories, we need to speak up and defend ourselves. Unless we do so, rapists will walk freely and repeat their disgusting actions on other innocent girls, because universities do not have sexual assault victims’ best interest at heart, as I learned the hard way.
post #21 of 175
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

Teger is perfect for the world of academia.

You're right. Sexual assault isn't a problem on campuses. It's also especially not a problem on campuses with a culture of drinking, partying and fraternities. There's also no incentive for Universitys to do what they can to cover up sexual assault cases and encourage victims not to report, because it's not as if such information is required to be shared with prospective students. There's also never been an issue with UVa requiring a federal investigation; their flawless sexual misconduct policy, as pointed out in the article in the OP (which I'm sure you read) is the gold standard by which other University's should be judged.

Some particularly egregious quotes from the girl's story:
Quote:
The hearing was held in the same room as the pre-hearing, where I sat diagonally across the rapist, just a few feet away from him. I could feel his glare on me every time I spoke, and I could see him smirk the few times I dared glance his way. I was sworn in on my honor at the beginning of the hearing while the rapist wasn’t. I spent ten hours answering the most invasive and humiliating questions from a panel who questioned every one of my statements.
Quote:
despite documentary evidence that the forensic nurse had changed her findings from her initial report that I had physical damage to nothing had happened to me in her lay report to the Panel, the decision was upheld.
Quote:
The investigators tried to make me feel sorry for him by insisting how “sad” he had looked when they interviewed him, and how he “couldn’t sleep” at night because he was so disturbed by my accusations.

But I'm sure this is just another case of a girl trolling for attention.

If you want to have a conversation about the existence of different burdens of proof between criminal investigations and University-level internal judicial hearings that's fine, but once the standards exist (and they do), shouldn't a University follow them? Shouldn't a University try to make the ordeal of an investigation and a hearing as non-traumatic for the victim as possible?
post #22 of 175
The university didn't believe her story. The cops didn't even believe her story by the very lax probable cause standard. Reading through her story there are several unbelievable elements which I'll get into if you like.

Why do you believe her?
post #23 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

... and her hearing involved her sitting a foot from her rapist while she was questioned for 10 hours about her sex life....

What the woman says in her email concerning the hearing:
Quote:
Had I ever had “visions” before? Was I on medication? Was I romantically interested in him? Did I say “no” forcefully enough for him to understand? Did it hurt because it was my first sexual experience?

I point this out as an example of why people can by cynical about things they hear. This person's account does not read like teger's accusation.
post #24 of 175
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

The university didn't believe her story. The cops didn't even believe her story by the very lax probable cause standard. Reading through her story there are several unbelievable elements which I'll get into if you like.
Why do you believe her?

I'm curious, so please do get into them. Do you find the circumstances of the hearing bothersome?
post #25 of 175
Think about it this way, Teger.

She says he drugged her, he says he didn't. Just assume for the sake of argument that they're equally credible, 50/50.

She says the cops and the DA ignored all the evidence and unreasonably refused to investigate or prosecute. Presumably they say otherwise. Again assume they're equally credible.

Then there's the deans and the professors and so forth refusing to give her a fair hearing. Doubt they would agree with that, but equally credible.

And the nurse who's conspiring to hide evidence of violent sexual assault. Again, equally credible.

I realize these things aren't entirely independent of each other, but what are the odds of her winning these four coin flips in a row?

Anyway, I always thought we were supposed to let ten guilty men go free rather than punish one innocent. Again, why should the rules be different here?
post #26 of 175
I'm suspicious of any attempt to convict more people of rape on slimmer evidence. As I am with the feminist attempt to redefine rape. Rape is a horrible crime and nobody should have their name attached to it unless it's absolutely clear they are guilty.
post #27 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Think about it this way, Teger.
She says he drugged her, he says he didn't. Just assume for the sake of argument that they're equally credible, 50/50.
She says the cops and the DA ignored all the evidence and unreasonably refused to investigate or prosecute. Presumably they say otherwise. Again assume they're equally credible.
Then there's the deans and the professors and so forth refusing to give her a fair hearing. Doubt they would agree with that, but equally credible.
And the nurse who's conspiring to hide evidence of violent sexual assault. Again, equally credible.
I realize these things aren't entirely independent of each other, but what are the odds of her winning these four coin flips in a row?
Anyway, I always thought we were supposed to let ten guilty men go free rather than punish one innocent. Again, why should the rules be different here?

Because RAAAAAAPE! 1 IN 4 WOMEN ARE RAPED! WOMEN! RAPED! CULTURE OF RAPE! RAAAAAAAPE!
post #28 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

I'm curious, so please do get into them. Do you find the circumstances of the hearing bothersome?
Quote:
“This was a very difficult case. Ms. X provides a very compelling and believable account of the events and has clearly been affected by this incident. Mr. Y, your behavior was crass and disrespectful but this panel could not come to a unanimous conclusion that the policy had been violated in this instance. That said, this panel urges you, Mr. Y, to evaluate your actions and your treatment of women in the future. We would strongly suggest that you consider counseling around the issue of consent and respecting the wishes of your sexual partners. The panel wishes Ms. X well as she continues to work through the trauma that this incident has clearly caused.


Let's be clear right off the bat. If this girl was looking for justice she was looking in the wrong place. I don't know what the policy that's being referenced is (I would assume it is a no-rape policy) but the only consideration the panel was supposed to have was whether that policy was violated.

Quote:
These are the words that Dean E. read out loud at the conclusion of a grueling ten-hour hearing in which I had to single-handedly defend my case against the person who had drugged and raped me last December.

1.I simply do not believe any such hearing lasted ten hours. That is wildly excessive to what a school administrative hearing would entail. Perhaps she's including time where there wasn't testimony being taken, or when the panel was out to lunch, or when the panel was deliberating, but there is no possible way she was cross examined or had to "single-handedly defend" her case for ten hours. That's either an outright falsification or a wild exaggeration. Neither bodes well for her credibility.
2. "Single-handedly defend my case." This represents a complete lack of knowledge about what her role was in this proceeding. She's not part of an adversarial hearing at a college adjudication hearing. She's a witness. She has no case. The case is AGAINST the accused. She is a piece of evidence, not a party to the matter.

Quote:
He offered me a beer during a club meeting on Grounds. The next thing I knew, I woke up on a bed in a sun-lit room, naked, in pain, next to him.

This is as specific as she gets in her whole story as to what happened. She never gives us details, either from her memory or another's, as to what happened. What she just stated is not proof of rape. She doesn't know what happened. Not remembering does not equal rape.
Quote:
I rushed out of the apartment as quickly as I could, even though I had no idea where I was. I spent the day confused, sinking deeper and deeper into depression, mercilessly blaming myself for putting myself in such a vulnerable position. I got home, ripped my clothes off and took an hour long shower, scrubbing my body down to the bone, cleaning any remaining semen I had on me. However, no matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t feel clean. I could only look at myself in the mirror in disgust, seeing him on top of me. I tried getting through the remainder of the day as though nothing had happened. It wasn’t so simple. Something in me had changed, and I didn’t know how to deal with it. Suicidal thoughts constantly crossed my mind. In one day, I had morphed from a cheery and carefree girl into an empty shell whose life had become a nightmare. By the end of the day, I was unable to keep the pain to myself and broke down in tears as I recounted the few memories I had of the night to two of my closest friends. I remember crumbling onto the floor as I realized that I had been raped.

I have no idea what went through her mind when this happened. I will say that this is the kind of cliche "I've been raped" story that is repeated over and over again. That doesn't mean it didn't happen to her, but it does mean her story is so closely aligned with the literature on this topic that it sounds like it could have influenced her memory. Consider all those people who claim to have been abducted by aliens and all describe the aliens the same, as little gray people with big heads. Now, just because all their stories are the same could mean they're all telling the truth and they've all been abducted, or it could mean they're all tainted, perhaps even unintentionally, with thoughts of what an abduction SHOULD be like.

Quote:
One of my professors contacted the Dean of Students office. I went there with my parents and was encouraged not to officially report the rape, but rather to go through mediation with the rapist.

I could easily believe she was encouraged not to report the rape. But the idea of going through mediation? I have a hard time believing the Dean would encourage something like that.

Which this brings up another point. We're assuming the story she's telling now is the same story should told previously. That's not necessarily the case. He statements could have differed wildly. If the Dean is suggesting mediation that suggests to me that her complaints to him at that time were not that serious.
Quote:
I refused. The sole idea of his sight and of his voice sickened me. Dean E. further added that no one had been expelled for rape in over ten years. How could this be possible, when the statistics are that 1 in 4 women are sexually assaulted in college?

1. Rape /= sexual assault.
2. Those statistics are bullshit.

Quote:
I went to the Martha Jefferson Hospital for pregnancy and STD tests. The examination triggered hidden yet vivid memories. It felt like I was going through the whole experience once again, processing the images my brain had suppressed. I began to piece the events of the night together.


She's piecing the events together a week later? No. She was wither blackout drunk, drugged with rohypnol, or knocked out. In any case she would not start to remember events at a later time. Memory doesn't work that way. She either remembers it or she doesn't. If she's "piecing it together" she's inventing things in her mind.

Quote:
A week after the rape, I gathered enough courage to file a complaint with the police. They took me to the UVA Hospital for a forensic examination. My complaint was dropped within a week, before the prosecution even looked at my forensic examination report. It took them two months to tell me that I did not have sufficient evidence. Apparently in Charlottesville, a woman has to be unconscious and carried back to a man’s place for non-consensual sex to be proved.


Where to start.
1. She still doesn't understand her role in this. In the criminal process she doesn't have a complaint. This isn't a civil proceeding. The state files charges against people. Saying her "complaint was dropped within a week" just doesn't make sense.
2. Prosecutors often don't look at evidence if the cops don't bring the evidence to their attention. Cops are the ones who bring charges to be filed to the prosecutor. And remember, the cop only needs probable cause to file the charges. That's a stupidly low standard. Basically if a crime might have been committed. And cops are trained to take sex assault victims at their word in these kinds of cases. So she's leaving something out here as to what she told the cops. There's some fact she's not telling us that they noticed and decided it didn't merit prosecution.
3. "It took them two months to tell me that I did not have sufficient evidence." Again, she doesn't understand her role. She's not the one who has evidence. She is evidence. The cops and prosecution determine if THEY have enough evidence to prosecute.
4. I have no idea what things are like in Charlottesville, and I admit that you buggers below the Mason-Dixon line are about 100 years behind the rest of civilization but if I really cared about this I have no doubt I could look on Lexis and find dozens if not hundreds of examples to the contrary.

Quote:
“It was just bad sex”, the prosecutor said. I was devastated.

This is almost certainly the real explanation for what happened that night. Bad sex followed by regret followed by anger followed by accusations.

Quote:
Dean E. had been in contact with me as the new semester began, encouraging me to file a complaint with the school and insisting that the standard of proof, based on “preponderance of evidence”, was much lower than before thanks to the new sexual misconduct rules signed by President Sullivan in July 2011
.

So wait, this school adopted the standard of evidence that the crazed women's advocate was advocating for in your initial post. AND THEY STILL COULDN'T MEET THAT STANDARD.

Quote:
Although I desperately wanted to move on and to forget all about my traumatic experience, I knew I had to file a complaint in the hope of removing a rapist from our beloved community.


What beloved community? Sue the fucking school, sue the fucking kid, sue everybody. Get a half million dollars and move to a college somewhere else. What the fuck?

Quote:
Weeks of investigation conducted by the Office of the Vice-President of Student affairs along with interviews with witnesses followed. I later found out that the entire investigation was skewed as the rapist’s defense attorney was monitoring it all along, behind my back.

Right, because it's not all about you. It's all about the accused and whether he should be expelled.

Quote:
Dean C., my advisor, constantly repeated “We cannot punish someone for being a jerk”.

Again, the real explanation comes out. It was bad sex followed by regret followed by allegations. This is the second person who came to this conclusion.

Quote:
The investigators tried to make me feel sorry for him by insisting how “sad” he had looked when they interviewed him, and how he “couldn’t sleep” at night because he was so disturbed by my accusations
.


Not sure they were trying to make her feel sorry for him, but perhaps they saw what we don't have the benefit of - something which clearly establishes this was not rape, but rather was a guy being a jerk. I'd be fucking disturbed by rape allegations too.


Quote:
This infuriated me. It didn’t matter to them that every day of my life had become a constant struggle. After my rape, it took me two weeks to be able to eat again, and another month to fall asleep at night. I couldn’t go to the bathroom for the entire day following the assault because it hurt so much. Regular panic attacks plagued me for months and still do from time to time. I forgot how to interact with my friends because nothing seemed important to me anymore. I couldn’t concentrate in class, and my grades began to suffer. Even now, nearly a year after the traumatic events, I still have violent nightmares. I have stayed at UVA because of my friends and professors who have shown me kindness and support. They are the UVA that I love, that has kept me in school.


Again, very cliche story, and there's no way for us to verify this.

Quote:
Finally, four months after the worst day of my life, I was granted a hearing. However, before the hearing, a pre-hearing was to take place. No one had prepared me for it.

She still doesn't understand her role.

Quote:
The day before, my advisor, Dean C., told me that both the rapist and I had to present our evidence and that Dean E. would ultimately decide which evidence would be presented to the panel at the hearing. Dean E., the rapist and I sat together in a small conference room in Peabody Hall. It was the first time I had seen him since the rape.

I do not believe this happened. No matter how hard hearted you are how do you put an alleged rapist and an alleged victim in a small room? IF this is in any way true she should immediately sue the shit out of the school and she will absolutely win.

Quote:
Suddenly, I forgot how to breathe and how to speak and I could barely restrain myself from running out of the room. What had happened before happened once again: he was the dominant figure and I could barely defend myself.

Again, she doesn't understand her role. She's not the one defending herself, he is.
Quote:
Before I knew it, most of my evidence, like he had been accused of drugging others, was deemed “prejudicial” against him and was ruled out as evidence for the hearing.


I'm actually pleasantly surprised by this. Prior accusations that do not result in convictions aren't admitted as evidence in criminal trials for exactly that reason. It's hearsay and it definitely is prejudicial.

Quote:
I tried maintaining my composure until I left Peabody Hall, but inside, I felt defeated, helpless and defenseless.


Ok.

Quote:
The hearing was held in the same room as the pre-hearing, where I sat diagonally across the rapist, just a few feet away from him. I could feel his glare on me every time I spoke, and I could see him smirk the few times I dared glance his way.

Nope. She may believe those things happened but they didn't. She's already said the accused had a defense attorney. Defense rule #1 - Don't let your client smirk at the victim.

Quote:
I was sworn in on my honor at the beginning of the hearing while the rapist wasn’t.

Well, did he testify at the beginning of the hearing? Was he ever sworn in or did he ever testify? People who don't testify aren't sworn in, dummy.

Quote:
I spent ten hours answering the most invasive and humiliating questions from a panel who questioned every one of my statements.

I don't believe the questioning lasted ten hours. Period. She's lying or exaggerating.

Quote:
Had I ever had “visions” before? Was I on medication? Was I romantically interested in him? Did I say “no” forcefully enough for him to understand? Did it hurt because it was my first sexual experience? On the other hand, the rapist’s testimony was barely questioned.

Those are pretty standard questions to ask.

Quote:
No one was interested in the fact that he contradicted himself and lied multiple times during the hearing.


Thanks for being so specific about what he lied about.

Quote:
He was shamelessly callous, arrogant, disrespectful and remorseless, as if he already knew the outcome.


That's her perception. I afford it no weight either way.
Quote:
None of my witnesses’ statements seemed to bear any weight against his word. Moreover, I had no form of support in the hearing despite the fact I had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), of which Dean E. was very well aware.

What does PTSD have to do with anything? Dog whistle.

Quote:
When Dean E. read out the verdict, I ran out of the room, sobbing uncontrollably like never before, and hid under a desk, wishing I could just die there. My own school, that I loved so much, failed to protect me. I had never felt so betrayed and let down in my life. The deans said that the hearing was supposed to be “therapeutic” as I faced the rapist. They said that they believed me.

The Dean said she was "believable" not that they believed her. Those aren't the same thing.

Quote:
They said that UVA was my home and that it loved me. Yet, how could they believe me and let him go completely unpunished? How could they uphold an Honor Code and expel students for cheating, lying and stealing while letting rapists stay in the University?

Well, possibly because they came to the conclusion no rape occurred.

Quote:
How could UVA ever be my home after what it had done to me? I didn’t want anything to do with it anymore. The only reason I pulled myself together and pushed through the semester was out of the little dignity and pride I had left within me and of the incredible support I got from my family, friends and the academic faculty.

Nice.
Quote:
My parents appealed the outcome of the hearing but, despite documentary evidence that the forensic nurse had changed her findings from her initial report that I had physical damage to nothing had happened to me in her lay report to the Panel, the decision was upheld.


No way to determine the truth of this without access to the documentary evidence. Nice way to be specific.

Quote:
I later found out that this same nurse is the Chair of the Sexual Misconduct Advisory Committee and she is also the wife of the Deputy Commonwealth Attorney.


Obviously it's a grand conspiracy.

Quote:
Quote:
Furthermore a second medical examination confirmed the damage was more than the nurse’s initial report. How can I have faith in an institution that engages in such deceitful conduct?

Who has faith in a college? Again she's going after this guy in the wrong forum.
Quote:
Today, as I write this, the rapist is still a student here and has ironically been rewarded with a teaching assistant’s position while I have struggled to stay in school and hold my life together.

How very 99% of her.
Quote:
The only reason I am sharing this is because I read Angie Epifano’s account of the way Amherst College treated her rape. She, like me, was raped and Amherst did nothing, even going so far as to try and suppress her from complaining. Angie’s courage has inspired me to share my story. A few days ago, all UVA students received an email from the Office of Civil Rights in D.C., asking us to share our experience with sexual assault and harassment at UVA by November 9, 2012, at this email address: OCRDCTitleIX@ed.gov. I contacted the OCR. Even though it might seem scary to share such painful memories, we need to speak up and defend ourselves. Unless we do so, rapists will walk freely and repeat their disgusting actions on other innocent girls, because universities do not have sexual assault victims’ best interest at heart, as I learned the hard way.

Of course universities don't have sexual assault victims' best interest at heart. They're schools, not fucking police officers. If you've been raped you go to the police, not the school. If the police don't believe you then you're shit out of luck criminally, but you can still file a civil lawsuit.

Too many problems with her story. I remain unconvinced.

Now, perhaps you could answer my question and tell me why you found her story convincing. You don't know this woman. You have no way to verify any of her story. Why accept it?
Edited by Harold falcon - 12/13/12 at 6:23pm
post #29 of 175
Thread Starter 
It's not so much that I believe her story -- maybe she was raped, maybe she wasn't -- but that I believe her description of the administrative procedure she went through, and that the University did what they could to both prevent her from originally reporting the crime, as well as to come down a decision that wouldn't necessitate further action on their part.

I believe this for a couple reasons:

1. There's been a lot of reluctance amont Universities nationwide to confront and deal with sexual assault
2. The particular culture at UVa
3. The history of issues that the school has had with reporting sexual assault and rape
4. The fact that her story was first revealed in the context of an investigation by the Office of Civil Rights, which had previously had issues with UVa's policies
post #30 of 175
Women would be well served to learn the martial arts starting around age 9.
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