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Mariano rubinacci

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
That's Amore: Naples' Five Major Apparel Houses, an article in the September/October, 1998 issue of Departures by Jo Durden-Smith discusses what the author believes to be the five most significant Neopolitan men's clothing manufacturers.  Included among the august fashion houses of Attolini, Kiton, Borrelli, and Isaia is the house of Mariano Rubinacci.   A search on styleforum.net for posts about this line produced a few hits, but not nearly as many I would have thought a company that has been ranked the equal of the other Neopolitan men's clothing giants would have.  Very few upscale men's stores would seem to carry this line (actually, none that I can recall), which seems most unusual. What are your opinions on Rubinacci style and quality relative to Kiton, Attolini, etc., and why is this company not as well known among the sartorially au courant, or as well represented by US retailers?
post #2 of 13
The only place I can remember seeing anything by Mariano Rubinacci was Bluefly, which had a lot of Rubinacci shirts.
post #3 of 13
i could be way off, but i think rubinacci was sold at bergdorf goodman in new york. i also seem to recall that he is basically a shirtmaker, and anything else with his name on it is made by someone else. this is just what i recall offhand.
post #4 of 13
http://www.rubinacci.co.jp/ Why do a number of companies have their "main" sites with the ".co.jp" extension? Loro Piana has it that way, Berluti does it this way, etc.
post #5 of 13
The article includes Rubinacci because apparently it was the efforts of Bebe Rubinacci (Mariano's father) and Vincenzo Attolini (Cesare's father) that led to the development of the giacca (the quintessential Neopolitan tailored jacket) as we know it. Not because Rubinacci is especially influential on the US R2W market. Matadorpoeta is right - Bergdorf used to carry Rubinacci ready-to-wear. I don't think that they still do. I've had a number of pieces, mostly suits and jackets made by Belvest, also an exquisite Rubinacci sportcoat that was made by Brioni. The cuts didn't seem to be anything special - standard issue Belvest and Brioni. I'm sure that the bespoke Rubinacci's from Napoli are another animal entirely.. Anyone had any firsthand experience?? Excellent article - make sure and read it if you haven't had the chance already...
post #6 of 13
Mariano Rubinacci's shop in Naples, London House was and is still today one of the finest men's shops in the world. Rubinacci is a man of sublime taste. His shop offers bespoke tailoring services that are among the best in Italy. The selection of fabrics available in the shop and the counsel of the tailors there are truly worth a visit. Many of the most famous tailors in Naples have worked at one time or another with Rubinacci; and the collaboration with the elder Attolini is well known. I especially like the cut of the typical Neopolitan shortish double breasted, natural shouldered jacket that is a specialty of the shop. A must in Naples. Cheers
post #7 of 13
Troops I realise I didn't answer all of the question which asked to compare Rubinacci to Attolini, Kiton, Borelli et al. Well there is no comparision. The others are semi-industrial factory produced while Rubinacci is "bespoke" in the true sense of the word. Of course they do also offer RTW, but I can't say that I have ever paid much attention to it to be able to compare one firms RTW to another. My main interest is bespoke and there, Rubinacci is in a completely different league. Hope this helps. Cheers.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Mariano Rubinacci's shop in Naples, London House was and is still today one of the finest men's shops in the world.
Spalla, do you, or anyone else, know anything about the Rubinacci shop in Milan? /Mr Sweden
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Gentelmen: Thank you for your knowledgeable responses.
post #10 of 13
Originally posted by Spalla:
Quote:
...asked to compare Rubinacci to Attolini, Kiton, Borelli et al. Well there is no comparision. The others are semi-industrial factory produced while Rubinacci is "bespoke" in the true sense of the word.
What is your definition of "true" bespoke?  In my opinion, that means a pattern individually cut for you, a suit that is (mostly) hand made.  From your post here and at Andy's, I seem to get the impression that you (and some others) believe that "true" bespoke means that it is made by one person.  Please correct me if I am wrong. As for Borelli, Kiton, and Brioni (Barbarini), I have "bespokes" from them, and I have seen my paper patterns drawn and archived (and compared them to some current patterns that were made for me last year). edit: as for your suggestion (at Andy's)  of getting a suit made by a tailor who works for Kiton, I did that two years ago.  The suit was indeed cheaper, material was very good, but I do not think it was as nice (styling wise) as the Kiton that I ordered that year.
post #11 of 13
Hello T4, Its a very good question. In my limited time visiting these two boards, I have seen the term "bespoke" used to describe just about any kind of suitmaking that involves taking a measurement. And yet bespoke has a very precise meaning. I have also noticed, and this is common because marketers purposely misuse terms to try and dupe potential clients, that bespoke, and MTM are used almost as synonyms. I will post a definition of bespoke along with an example on a subsequent post. Its very important to use the terms correctly and consistently or we will fail in communicating to each other every time. To answer your specific question about Borelli and Kiton. They make what I call "high grade MTM." They start with a standard pattern, cut the suit, do a fitting, then do alterations to that suit after the fitting, then (if they are good) they retouch the pattern to try and avoid having to do the alterations again. So, in a way, you will have a pattern that is your own kinda. But the pattern was not cut for you and as such the subtle,finesse points we search for in bespoke fit are not there and will not be reflected in the finished product. It will not fit you as well, nor feel as confortable to you as a 100% handmade, handsown (no machines please) suit. With respect to your experience in Naples. There are poor tailors, good tailors, excellent tailors, and genius tailors. A poor tailor will make poor suits. Better luck next time. Cheers
post #12 of 13
Hi Spalla, nice to have you over here too
Quote:
With respect to your experience in Naples. There are poor tailors, good tailors, excellent tailors, and genius tailors. A poor tailor will make poor suits.
As I mentioned in my previous post, the suit that was made for me was excellent, I just preferred the style of the Kiton better.
Quote:
They start with a standard pattern, cut the suit, do a fitting, then do alterations to that suit after the fitting, then (if they are good) they retouch the pattern to try and avoid having to do the alterations again. So, in a way, you will have a pattern that is your own kinda. But the pattern was not cut for you and as such the subtle,finesse points we search for in bespoke fit are not there and will not be reflected in the finished product. It will not fit you as well, nor feel as confortable to you as a 100% handmade, handsown (no machines please) suit.
I would respectfully disagree on some of your abovementioned points. I do have some "no-name" bespoke suits made for me in Italy by tailors (Roman and Neapolitan), while some have been "as good as" the big brands in fit and quality/technical execution, some have not been as good in the styling dept. As for the patterns not being cut for me by Borrelli or Kiton, I would not know if the paper patterns were modified versions of what they already had. All I know is that last year when I went to visit Kiton and had another fitting for a new suit, they noticed the increase in chest size (of about 2cm), and later showed me my old pattern on top of the new pattern they made for me, and I could see the adjustment (miniscule though it was) that they did. For Borrelli, I do know that I have a problem with their standard cut suits (armhole and biceps a tad too small), and I have had "bespoke" made by them. It looks a bit different from their MTM and RTWs. I am looking forward to your treatise.
post #13 of 13
HI T4, Ok, all great points. Let's not confuse "bespoke" construction and styling. Bespoke construction can aid styling, but styling can never make up for the lack of poor construction. In reality, they are two different subjects. I think styling is the responsibility, to a large degree, of the customer. I design my own suits. I listen to the tailor but he is there to execute according to my designs, period. If he is unwilling or unable to do so, then he will not be my tailor for long. I take responsibility for the look. I know what I want. If its sublime, then pat me on the back. If its wretched design, then buy me a drink cause I have no one to blame. If you are having problems with the styling of your garments, take the time to study photos and see what you like and want. Learn how to communicate this is sartorial terms that a tailor will understand. Then lead the process and don't be led.. Remember that the great dressers of the past, like Fred Astaire, Cary Grant etc had encyclopediac knowledge of tailoring. Grant even worked as a designer; and he designed most of his own clothes. Get the knowledge and apply it. Cheers. T4phage, the ideal is to have great individual styling with splendid bespoke construction. That why we are working with tailors.
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