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How relevant was your college education to your career choice? - Page 3

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by amathew View Post

Most companies use the title "Software Engineer" and "Computer Programmer" to mean the same thing. It's basically programming and not
hardware work. Never heard of anyone with the job title of 'software programmer' being used in the States. 

Not to mention "Software Engineering" is a common undergraduate major, and largely focused on programming. Almost same as "Computer 
Science". However, "Computer Engineering" tends to be more hardware based.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor_of_Software_Engineering
Then I clearly see a bad use of the word "Engineer". I agree that most of the Computer/Software engineers end up being "Computer programmers" which is very frustrating, but it's unlikely that someone with only a high school diploma is qualified for the title of "Engineer".

Anyway, in my case, I'm finishing a five-years degree of Computer Engineering. I have knowledge in Maths, Physics, a bit of electronic, hardware, programing and also Software Engineering. So, will my collegue education be relevant to my career choice? It will be quite relevant in my case, but certainly I can end up being many things and I'm not sure what my future holds next. I just hope not to be sitting next to a High School diploma guy doing basic programming, but that of course will depend, as has been said before, on the each individual's skills, the title means nothing but a prove of what you're able to do. So, if you can, choose the degree you think you will be good at, if not, don't give up, just show the world what are you capable of and don't worry if your future career has nothing to do with your previous education.
post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FranSuitman View Post

Then I clearly see a bad use of the word "Engineer". I agree that most of the Computer/Software engineers end up being "Computer programmers" which is very frustrating, but it's unlikely that someone with only a high school diploma is qualified for the title of "Engineer".

 

*Shrugs shoulders*

 

Don't care the least bit. I find that the only people who care about that distinction are snobs like my cousin who like to brag about how he's an engineer and 'programmers are not engineers.'

 

My response to my cousin every time he made those comments...."In 60 or so years, we'll all be dead and rotting in the ground...who gives a shit about engineering vs programming vs basketweaving vs MIT vs Harvard vs Alabama State vs Mercedes vs Kia vs whatever."

 

 

Given that SF is full of a certain "type" (aka right-wing elitist snobs) of person, I'm probably in the minority on that one.


Edited by amathew - 12/13/12 at 12:49pm
post #33 of 34
Decreasingly relevant. I was a double major in English and Classical Studies. First job was in academic publishing (very relevant), then I began working in online marketing for an ecommerce business (less relevant, but facility with words is useful). Now I'm in process of changing careers to become a web (software) developer.

Although Classics was not relevant to my ultimate career choice, I wouldn't take it back. It taught me discipline, how to study, and what it means to actually know something. I had a few mind blowing English classes, that I would never trade for anything. But in retrospect,, it would have been good to double major in classics & computer science and just take those electives in avant-garde poetry. If a lack of degree in computer science becomes a career obstacle, I may try to get one if I (or someone else) can pay for it.
post #34 of 34

it is very conpulsory that our college should be provided all that education service facility which is important for making our career.

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