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Tempura Sushi - Page 4

post #46 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD View Post
And art, and architecture to some extent, probably weapons as well (pre and post isolationist).

Where did they borrow their sword-making techniques from?

I understand that Spain was well-known for making swords at one time.
post #47 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
Where did they borrow their sword-making techniques from?

I understand that Spain was well-known for making swords at one time.

Most likely China. I know that there are strictly Japanese designs, but their blacksmithing knowledge probably came from China.

Sometime in the 17th century, they got a hold of a couple of muskets (I think it was just two muskets that were bought), de-constructed them and started using guns, and then subsequently building castles.
post #48 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD View Post
Most likely China. I know that there are strictly Japanese designs, but their blacksmithing knowledge probably came from China. Sometime in the 17th century, they got a hold of a couple of muskets (I think it was just two muskets that were bought), de-constructed them and started using guns, and then subsequently building castles.
Actually, from what I understand, the Japanese swordsmiths were about the last original thinkers in Japan. They were making world beating superior cutting blades as far back as the 13th century, blades that were basically unsurpassed in utility, durability, and design outside of Japan until the 19th century.
post #49 of 82
Saba shioyaki = Seriously one of the best things ever.
post #50 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Actually, from what I understand, the Japanese swordsmiths were about the last original thinkers in Japan. They were making world beating superior cutting blades as far back as the 13th century, blades that were basically unsurpassed in utility, durability, and design outside of Japan until the 19th century.

Are you sure this isn't one of the cases where they got the idea from China, then made it a whole lot better?

From what I've heard (and I definitely don't read up on this) the Japanese were far ahead of their time in terms of weapon design, so I have no doubts that their shit was the dankest. But just wondering who the OG nihonjin was who had a sword, and where he got it from.
post #51 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Well what have you eaten exactly? Almost none of what I mentioned is "sweet". In fact, most Japanese food isn't sweet. Quite a few condiments are sweet, but only because most Japanese food is salty, citrusy, or bitter. It goes well with it. The only things I can think of right off the top of my head as "sweet" are unagi no kabayaki, yakitori, and other sauced and then grilled items. And then it's only because of the sauce (similar in some ways to barbeque or teriyaki sauce here in the states).
I find bonito stock to have a slightly sweet smoky taste and that is what doesn't agree with my palate. I am not talking about teriyaki or whatever.
post #52 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD View Post
Are you sure this isn't one of the cases where they got the idea from China, then made it a whole lot better?

From what I've heard (and I definitely don't read up on this) the Japanese were far ahead of their time in terms of weapon design, so I have no doubts that their shit was the dankest. But just wondering who the OG nihonjin was who had a sword, and where he got it from.

Japanese swordmaking was driven by the fact that there is very little decent iron ore indigenous to Japan, so the only way to make steel was by heating the crappy iron, hitting it with flux, then folding it and hammering it down. This allowed carbon to infuse the iron (creating steel) and created the beautiful layered look for which the katana is famous. The characteristic difference in coloration between the edge and spine of the katana is caused by the differential hardening of the blade, which is hard at the edge and soft at the spine.

As the story goes, the design of the katana was driven by necessity because the older chokuto straight blades were unable to defeat the superior armor of the Mongols. In order to make a blade that was strong enough to maintain an edge, but flexible enough not to shatter on impact, the technique of differential hardening was developed. Before the final heat treat, a blade is coated in a clay mixture, then the clay on the edge is scraped off to leave the steel bare. This allows the edge and spine to cool at different rates when quenched.

Chinese blades are not (at least not widely) made with the foregoing techniques because the Chinese had access to better iron ore. Japanese smithing techniques came about in order to turn crap into a decent blade, and the aesthetically pleasing aspects of the katana are just side effects of those smithing techniques.
post #53 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
I don't like Thai. I prefer Vietnamese.

food? are you talking about food?
post #54 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidicboy View Post
food? are you talking about food?

Indeed.

I dislike peanuts (legumes in general) and sour tastes which is what puts me off Thai cuisine.
post #55 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
lol... I love this thread. All I have to say is that the Burger King Croissanwich is totally the most delicious French food I've ever eaten! Who else loves French food?

Oh, and Italian food! MMM MMM.

didn't you try to call me out on pizza-snobbery just a few days ago?
post #56 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
Saba shioyaki = Seriously one of the best things ever.
God damn... Yumi's mom made that for me several times. I can wholeheartedly agree with you on this. I was at the store the other day and saw some Saba in the case and was like "damn, that sounds really good right now" but no one at my house eats fish, but me. Curry rice is a personal favorite, I like it with a thick spicy sauce, a boiled egg, and a little cheese on top. I remember seeing Salarymen restaurants selling huge plates of Curry rice for like 400JPY. It sure hit the spot. And Brian, you are a wiener. Nattou is good for you, it doesnt taste nearly as bad as people make it out to be. Who likes An (An Pan, or other red bean treats)? Karaage (I make this all the time), Yakisoba, Udon (curry udon, really good to make with leftover curry), Tarako/Mentaiko is also good. Has anyone else had "chizu mochi," I had some in Kobe at a matsuri and it was very very good. It was a 8" round 1" thick disk of mochi that was grilled brushed with shoyu, covered with veggies then they melted cheddar over the top of it. It was a little chewy but the mochi really took in the flavors. But still nothin beats a big bottle of Asahi and some takoyaki on a hot summer night, the sky ablaze with hanabi and a cute yukata clad girl at your side.
post #57 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini View Post
Shabu Shabu was becoming the new "sushi" the last time I was in LA. Pretty trendy.

So fun and tasty, but it's anything but filling.
post #58 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysol View Post
didn't you try to call me out on pizza-snobbery just a few days ago?

You only have 161 posts under your belt, perhaps you haven't been around long enough to notice that I don't follow any rules... not even my own.

That being said, I don't think I called you out on pizza snobbery, I think I called you out because you said something dumb, like "I'm not going to read the 9 previous pages of this thread , but here's my opinion, and if it wasn't already mentioned, you guys are all idiots" or something along those lines.



And then you tried to defend your dumb post by saying that there were two (gasp!) mentions of Dominos pizza which would then somehow make all the other useful information in the thread which you are too lazy to read, irrelevant.

I then had to correct you on the Dominos pizza thing, seeing as there was only one mention of it up until that point, which you would have known, had you read the thread.

Starting to ring a bell?
post #59 of 82
Oh yeah - mochi wrapped in nori, baked a couple minutes in the toaster oven, then dipped in soy sauce or maybe ponzu/soy (haven't tried that...) is also a great snack. I think I'm going to go make some.
post #60 of 82
Mochi is also really good warmed up, cut open and a slice of cheese inside, then wraped in nori. I made a bunch of Smoked Salmon Onigiri a couple weeks ago and brought it to a school function, I was about raped when the Japanese kids found out. I am just glad I ate my share before I got there otherwise I would have been SOL.
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