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Aubercy hand sewn?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Are all aubercy hand-sewn/hand welted, even RTW?

 

From there blog:

http://www.aubercy.com/en/passion-for-our-craft/hand-sewn-goodyear/

 

Hand-sewn Goodyear

The term Goodyear is often obscured by methods that have become more and more industrialized. It uses materials (like base forms in glued canvas which are neither shapely nor strong) that are a far cry from those that should be used for shoes the way we design them. In this technical area, no matter what the product range, the ordinary is commonplace and omnipresent, but there is very little “whirlwind” or “instant repetition.”

We designed our Goodyear to turn this all around. We have the joy of making what no one makes anymore, because the Aubercy design house is one of the last, if not the only, in Paris to produce ready to wear hand-sewn Goodyear footwear.

There is no machine in our workshop that sews Goodyear welts, and we believe that’s the way every one of our shoes should be made. The extra soul that our shoes possess and the secret for the ultimate pleasure enjoyed by the wearer is due to the artisan’s hand.

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When the Goodyear is hand-sewn, it creates a whole number of unimagined aspects that take you far above and beyond the ordinary. There are no base forms made from glued canvas in our shoes. We have welts that are hand-sewn in the thickness of the innersole. So what is needed is a natural material that is both thick and flexible, and of uncompromising quality. The result of this density is that each client will mold the shoe to his foot over time. This refined appointment is ample evidence that hand-sewn products are of incomparable quality.

Still, our highly qualified artisans really make all the difference. Their 30 years of experience result in incomparable durability and real beauty. Just like the welt wheel mark on our unequaled finish quality. Two hours of work are also required to sew one of our pairs, instead of the two minutes it takes when the task is automated on a machine.

So why do we continue in the traditional way when manufacturing has become so mechanized and where the only things that matter are the things you can see through aesthetic design tricks? Because we believe that each of our creations bears our name and requires our commitment to quality. Because our family’s independence allows us to work in our own way. For respect for our marvelous profession. So that every creation will be a way of honoring the great shoemakers that have come before us. Lastly and especially for the joy that comes from 75 years of making the most beautiful product. Because of comfort, technical perfection, our perfect sizing, and distinct quality, the Aubercy design house attracts loyal followers, not just customers.

If you are a true lover of footwear elegance, you have to try our shoes at least once so you can truly appreciate the difference. True connoisseurs know and wear our shoes, and everyone else just talks about them!

post #2 of 8
Only two models at the shop when I was in Paris in November. A derby (William) and an oxford (James). Both in black calf, but can be special ordered in different colors (and I suppose materials). Waist is square on the outside/bevelled on the inside. Finsished at bespoke level. Extended stiffener from the heel. Overall quite nice. Price was about €1100. Will probably get a pair next time around. NO GEMMING!!!
Edited by Kuro - 1/11/13 at 6:00pm
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuro View Post

Only two models at the shop when I was in Paris in November.

From what I understand many of the Aubercy's shoes are actually blake.
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuro View Post

Only two models at the shop when I was in Paris in November. A derby (William) and an oxford (James). Both in black calf, but can be special ordered in different colors (and I suppose materials). Waist is square on the outside/bevelled on the inside. Finsished at bespoke level. Extended stiffener from the heel. Overall quite nice. Price was about €1100. Will probably get a pair next time around. NO GEMMING!!!

 

blind welt stitching on the inside or just those faux blind welt stitched like say G&G Deco, EG TD, etc?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by forseti6 View Post


From what I understand many of the Aubercy's shoes are actually blake.

 

:(

post #5 of 8
All the Aubercy shoes that I have seen were certainly Blake-stitched. But I haven’t been to Paris for a few years and things might have changed.



Kuro mentioned two styles that were hand-welted: William and James. Here is a picture of the James and the shoe is certainly hand-welted, although, if I read the photograph correctly, without two channels carved to form a holdfast. That way seems to be quite common in Italy and further apart. Whether this method has intrinsic problems, compared with the established central-European way of doing the welting, I cannot answer,
.
If you check the “new arrivals” careful, you will find that the only William and James are listed as having a hand-stitched welt. It is fair to presume, all the other models are produced differently

http://www.aubercy.com/en/category/new-arrivals/

Only Aubercy can tell you if William and James are supposed to be isolated products or if, within due course, the production method for the entire collection will get changed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

blind welt stitching on the inside or just those faux blind welt stitched like say G&G Deco, EG TD, etc?

The welt is never blind-stitched (the welt stitching is always underneath the sole). If a bevelled waist is required the welt is placed further away from the last edge (feather edge) than for a square waist..
post #6 of 8
I think I saw a norwegian, but the rest of what I saw were blake.
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

All the Aubercy shoes that I have seen were certainly Blake-stitched. But I haven’t been to Paris for a few years and things might have changed.



Kuro mentioned two styles that were hand-welted: William and James. Here is a picture of the James and the shoe is certainly hand-welted, although, if I read the photograph correctly, without two channels carved to form a holdfast. That way seems to be quite common in Italy and further apart. Whether this method has intrinsic problems, compared with the established central-European way of doing the welting, I cannot answer,
.
If you check the “new arrivals” careful, you will find that the only William and James are listed as having a hand-stitched welt. It is fair to presume, all the other models are produced differently

http://www.aubercy.com/en/category/new-arrivals/

Only Aubercy can tell you if William and James are supposed to be isolated products or if, within due course, the production method for the entire collection will get changed.

 


The welt is never blind-stitched (the welt stitching is always underneath the sole). If a bevelled waist is required the welt is placed further away from the last edge (feather edge) than for a square waist..

 

What you described is blind welt stitched as far as I understand.  Please educate me if I am wrong.  Picture courtesy of Posh @ newsaboutshoes.net and my own shoes.

 

Extra allowance to 'hide' the welt.  Left is blind welt at waist/beveled waist.  Right is all blind welt, probably for court shoes, pumps, etc.

 

And construction of blind welt stitch:

AppleMark

 

JLP example (I think), regular welt and transition to blind welt stitching (not blind stitching) at the waist.

post #8 of 8
What the Lobb picture shows is the sole stitching, not the welt stitching and how the welt looks trimmed and finished..

In a hand-stitched sole (which features a bevelled waist) the stitching begins at the heal with a relatively large stitch set as far back as possible (the actual term is "sewing") until you've passed the waist area, then you go to the stitch length you have determined for the sole. 10 stitches/inch is considered a good standard these days, you work your way around the sole until you reach the waist at the other side then you employ the sewing again. All this is part of the sole stitching not the welting.

Aubercy never claims their soles are hand-stitched, so the machine stitch is likely to start at the heal and end at the heal. How good (or how clumsy) the bevelled waist looks depends depends how careful the welt is cut back and shaped in the waist area. In a standard machine-made shoe (which would include Lobb Prestige) all the trimming is done by rotating sanding wheels. G&G 'Deco' and EG 'Topdrawer' claim that a lot of the waist finishing is done by hand.

How close a machine stitched and carefully hand-finished bevelled waist can possibly come to a all-handmade bevel depends in the quality of both artisans. After all, also hand-made bevelled waists can turn turn out a right dog if the artisan messes up. (Not every handmade buttonhole is a wonder to look at). It just depends what kind of work the craftsman does regularly and so becomes part of his comfort zone. For example, Italian shoemakers can do all kind of fancy 'Norvegese' work, but they cannot do a bevelled waist (they don't even try),
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