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Armed robbery - Page 5

post #61 of 112
Take the example of France: do you really believe they have it worse despite having, by all accounts, "more government"?
post #62 of 112
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Take the example of France: do you really believe they have it worse despite having, by all accounts, "more government"?
I like France and the French people very much. They have a good perspective on life there. I just don't care for their politics that's all. They are also a waning empire and I think they wear that on their sleeves too much while engaging in international politics. But as a people, they certainly have better taste, IMHO, than most Americans do. Great clothing sales in July too.
post #63 of 112
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I still don't see how "black looking rich or dressing well" fits into this post.Seems a little odd
i mentioned blacks not looking rich because la guy brought up the question of why it seems white people get mugged more often than others.
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Even more odd you mention a mexicans and Cubans getting mugged, and going by your looking rich statement I'd assume you mean these group are well dressed or rich,
when i mentioned cubans and mexicans getting mugged i was referring specifically to guys that i personally know. i wasn't making a statement about groups in general.
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blacks have higher incomes in California than both groups. That goes for both native -born and immigrants
i'm perfectly aware that there are plenty of rich blacks in my city. i see them driving expensive cars and i see them everyday in my restaurant spending $200 on lunch. but there's a difference between being rich and looking rich. most of the rich black dudes i see dress like teenagers even though their in their 30s. they wear fubu, phat farm, sean john, and all the other ghetto brands being hawked on mtv--the same stuff the poor people are wearing. you also see a lot of poor blacks wearing flashy jewelry and watches so you can see how it's difficult to distinguish if they have money or not just by seeing them walk down the street. i know in other cities there are a lot of middle class blacks who wear khakis and button down oxford shirts, (atlanta for example) but l.a. isn't like that. of course i'm generalizing.
post #64 of 112
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when i mentioned cubans and mexicans getting mugged i was referring specifically to guys that i personally know. i wasn't making a statement about groups in general.
Ok , I misunderstood.
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i'm perfectly aware that there are plenty of rich blacks in my city. i see them driving expensive cars and i see them everyday in my restaurant spending $200 on lunch. but there's a difference between being rich and looking rich. most of the rich black dudes i see dress like teenagers even though their in their 30s. they wear fubu, phat farm, sean john, and all the other ghetto brands being hawked on mtv--the same stuff the poor people are wearing. you also see a lot of poor blacks wearing flashy jewelry and watches so you can see how it's difficult to distinguish if they have money or not just by seeing them walk down the street. i
Actually, you hit on one of the main complaint I have about how blacks dress. Though I don't know how someone poor can afford a big pice of jewelry ,fakes I guess can be substituted. I never saw what is so attractive about a huge white T-shirt and some jeans with all the baseball teams symbols patched around it. But I don't think its any worse than the vintage T-shirt look. I think black men in L.A dress differently than they do on the East. Sean Johns popular here but no one wears FUBU. Thinking about Sean John and other Hip - Hop clothing. We have large groups of Asians especially at Yale who love wearing that gear. Usually Korean or Japanese. I thought it was interesting since I never noticed it before.
post #65 of 112
Thread Starter 
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Thinking about Sean John and other Hip - Hop clothing. We have large groups of Asians especially at Yale who love wearing that gear. Usually Korean or Japanese. I thought it was interesting since I never noticed it before.
Not to make a stereotyping statement, but I've never noticed a large-scale adoration for the "urban" clothing lines among Asians. That is rather interesting. Have you noticed if they're foreign students or Americans by birth?
post #66 of 112
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Not to make a stereotyping statement, but I've never noticed a large-scale adoration for the "urban" clothing lines among Asians. That is rather interesting. Have you noticed if they're foreign students or Americans by birth?
I've noticed this too. This are usually the same dudes who are into the rice-mobiles - and yes, they tend to be Japanese and Korean rather than Chinese. There are several tribes of young Asians - neo hip-hoppers (as above), casuals (think sneaker culture - untucked shirts and Paper Denims rather than Sean John), and the largest contingent, whom I call the Banana Brigade, and who look like they were attacked, devoured, and disgorged by the nearest Banana Republic.
post #67 of 112
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and the largest contingent, whom I call the Banana Brigade, and who look like they were attacked, devoured, and disgorged by the nearest Banana Republic.
Funny - I just sold a Banana Republic shirt on ebay to an Asian guy. He bid almost the full retail price for a used shirt that wasn't anything special - just an ordinary button down short sleeved shirt. Nice looking shirt, but I had no expectations of getting anywhere near that amount (was hoping for $15 or so).
post #68 of 112
Oh, and LA Guy, don't forget about two other important categories of Asian guys that I've noticed around campus: The Anime-Wannabes: Seen wearing brightly-colored nylon shirts and pants, often times adorned with dragons. Similar to characters in Anime movies. The Vintage Gang: Seen wearing very late 1970's and early 1980's clothing. Puffy ski vests in bright colors (most often with stripes too) are a favorite accessory.
post #69 of 112
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Have you noticed if they're foreign students or Americans by birth?
They are usually Japanese or Korean from what I know and as L.A Guy pointed they are rarely Chinese. The Chinese often snicker at them, I don't know why I never ventured to ask.
post #70 of 112
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They are usually Japanese or Korean from what I know and as L.A Guy pointed they are rarely Chinese. The Chinese often snicker at them, I don't know why I never ventured to ask.
I might have a little bit of insight here, Japanese fashion and trends are kind of a guilty pleasure of mine. I don't participate in them (being in the U.S. it, would be rather odd) but I keep track of the latest and most bizzare as sort of a hobby. My best guess is that the Japanese youths of which you speak, were either born in, or lived extensivly in Japan, or were raised in a very traditional Japanese household. Because of the many differences between Western and Japanese culture, they are trying to fit in better in western society by easily identifying themselves within currently popularized stereotypes. Conformity is very important to the Japanese. Individualism at one point in time was considered abberant behavior. Your greatest goal in life was to be a cog in the corporate machine. Now that the bubble economy has collapsed, the western business model is starting to gain a foothold, and the individual ideal is just starting to be discovered. The Japanese and Korean societies don't really have a strong individualistic identity like we do here in the West, so they tend to fall back on stereotypes and distorted western media perceptions to try and - for lack of a better term - seek their own individuality by emulating the things they feel best reflect their general attitudes and beliefs (I.E. - I've been led to believe that Americans all watch MTV. Almost all of the people on MTV are rappers, who are tough. I want to be tough, therefore I'm going to wear FUBU. Therefore I'm an American."). Sounds strange, I know... but I assure you, thought processes go on like that every day in the warped minds of the Japanese teenager. Its closest western counterpart that I can really categorize is the Abercrombie & Fitch "movement". For some reason millions of people age 12-25+ find it neccesary to shop for and wear unbearably bland clothing. A&F, Eddie Bauer, GAP, etc. Does anyone remember a time when you couldn't tell what brand of grey, hooded sweatshirt someone was wearing two blocks away? The logo seems to be the major selling point now, as far as I can tell. It must be because everyone else does it. Someone else can try to explain that one. I'm getting depressed just thinking about it. And I think the Chinese are laughing because they hate us Japanese for WW2. They enjoy us being behind the curve in anything, they don't care what it is. And they are laughing at the Koreans who think they are Japanese. But the Japanese laugh at everyone, it's just that nobody can see us laughing because we have no outward emotions. Duh.
post #71 of 112
I apologize for the previous post, I sort of left a half finished thought in the middle when I went for a smoke break - I was going to type; blah blah blah...Now that the bubble economy has collapsed, the western business model is starting to gain a foothold, and the individual ideal is just starting to be discovered, The Japanese are new at trying to figure out what to do with independant thought and personal style...blah blah blah
post #72 of 112
l had a kid try to rob me at knifepoint a few years ago. l turned around laughed at him, kicked him in the stomach, dragged him up the laneway, took all his clothing off, pissed (urinated) on him, took his money and gave it to a beggar. l am not afraid of many people. When l get money from a streetmachine (bank on the street) l have eyes in the back of my head. People mug me at their own risk. Had it been a shotgun [though], l would have pooped my pants. Had a family member who was in an armed robbery; he was made to lay on the floor and was shot at. The bullets went thru his hair and clothing. He has never been the same sinse. lt can really affect some people. P.S: Navystyles: people can be perfect. Stay tuned for more of shoomans health talk. l am curre4ntly debating if l should define good health. lt will blow your mind but it may be enough to send me to the asylum.
post #73 of 112
To the original poster, I think that was about the best way you could have played it. As for home invasions, I've had my apartment broken into three times, on two occasions I was present, and confronted the would-be robbers with a rifle and extremely bright flashlight. The authorities dealt with them accordingly. In the first case, the assailant was carrying a 8" butcher knife and in the second they were carrying a saturday night special. I would have to agree with VM that I didn't want to find out what they were interested in doing with those weapons. I have also been involved with three muggings and have luckily emerged unscathed with my property intact and healthy, due to luck, some stupidity on the part of the criminals (they usually aren't the brightest people in the world) and my H&K USP. I've lived in both Europe and Asia for extended periods of time, and my general feeling is that while stricter gun control laws may make it more difficult to for criminals to obtain weapons, I think the average person is more vulnurable to a break-in than an appopriately armed American. While the statistics show that you are more likely to be injured or killed if you own a weapon, I think that the lack of training that is common with handguns is a primary cause. Logically thinking through the process, if you are awake and alert, you know your home better, especially in the dark, than any intruder, and would presumably have the element of surprise. I find it hard to believe a trained marksman would be at a disadvantage over someone with no weapons whatsoever.
post #74 of 112
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As for home invasions, I've had my apartment broken into three times, on two occasions I was present, and confronted the would-be robbers with a rifle and extremely bright flashlight.  The authorities dealt with them accordingly.
You have more restraint than I do. If I found myself with a rifle, confronting an armed intruder in my home, when the authorities arrived, they would have found that I had already "dealt with them accordingly." (Although in my case it would likely be a 9mm carbine rather than a rifle. Easier to control in close quarters, less penetration through walls if I miss, a larger magazine capacity, and a bright light and laser sight already mounted on the stock.)
post #75 of 112
yeah, my rifle is actually a Bushmaster Target 20 with some "modifications". between the laser sight and the streamlight stinger hp, the would be robbers were a bit intimidated. I also have a pre-94 Ingram Mac-10, and about 8 pistols... Gun shows in Kentucky are nice, I stopped by on the way to Florida several times.
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