or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › Shaving razors and products
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shaving razors and products - Page 5

post #61 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullitt View Post

I see, its a boar bristle brush.
Indeed. I have much more expensive silver tip badgers (with relative stand) but are of the home user/short type, and I much prefer the length of this Omega for how easy he creates leather with hard soaps like the P.160.
post #62 of 69

You can buy a medium-weight Merkur for about $50 and it won't be so aggressive that will maul your face. Most people recommend starting off with a less aggressive blade but that all depends on how willing you are to slowly learn to shave with a safety razor. I use feather blades which are amazing but they will cut you if you make even a minor mistake.

 

Right now I am using Bigolo shaving cream. It's about ~$10 for a large tube so it is quite cheap. I am told it's the old formula for Poraso which some people prefer. Not only does it lather well with some water but it doesn't have a ton of ingredients like Taylor Bond Street, and again it's super cheap. You can even pick it up at Bath and Bodyworks in the mall.

 

Get a cheap bowl for lathering ~$15. I would suggest you buy a decent boar brush since the cheap one I have has lost a lot of hairs in 2-3 years. Perhaps something in the $30 region. That will all cost you around $100 and I can assure you that shaving with a safety razor is light-years better than a regular gilette.

 

If you do decide to try a safety razor, I can't say it enough- start off SLOW. If you have to shave in a rush, use your old razor. All the times I cut myself while learning to use a safety razor were when I had to leave the house in 15 minutes. Do not watch a video of someone who has tons of experience and think you can shave as well as they do, as quickly as they do. You have to learn the nuances of your face. You should be using little to no pressure with the blade. For me there are places on my face that I cannot use any amount of pressure or I run the risk of cutting myself badly (my chin mainly) there are other areas like my neck and sideburns that I don't have to worry about nearly as much.

 

I also recommend shaving right after a shower or at the very least with a hot towel before shaving. I dip the towel in steaming water, hold it to cool off for about 15 seconds, then apply to my face with pressure. It works wonders.

 

Good luck!

post #63 of 69
@eprex, all very helpful tips that, from my short experience, are true. I got my razor as a gift; I have small hands, so my parents chose a short handled version for me, and this was brilliant of them! As you say, you hand to learn your own face, as you now control the blade angle, pressure, etc. I took my time the first few times, just as you're recommending above, and I'm glad I did, as this allowed me to pause, think, examine, as I went. The short handle felt odd at first, but it gave me amazing control of the razor, just as a racquetball racquet is easier to control than a squash racquet. Now that I have the hang of it, I find the shave much more comfortable around the difficult spots. I control how the blade passes over the strange angles at my Adam's apple, around my jaw to under my ear, and so on. With my old razor, I had to trust the hinged head. It required less focus, and skill, but the result was not nearly as good. With practice, I can now shave almost as quickly as before.

I certainly second your recommendation to take time, and attention, with the learning process.
post #64 of 69

Merkur 34C razor - ~30

Semogue 1305 brush ~ $20

Proraso shaving soap ~ $10

Alum block ~ $5-10

Thayers Witch Hazel ~ $5-10

 

There are others things you might end up buying if you get into the shaving thing. Stand, bowl, etc. If you want a straight you'll need the stones and strop. Some people who are really hardcore into it call it RAD (razor acquisition disorder) :D

 

I started wetshaving about 8 months ago. At first I was scared to take the razor to my face, but I heard a helpful tip that will help you learn how much pressure is really needed with these things. Put shaving cream on a balloon and shave it without making it pop. Also, for the first month or so, only do one pass during your shaves until you become more proficient.

 

My setup is a Dovo straight razor, Star Shaving Big Daddy strop, Mitchell's Wool Fat, Semogue 1305, Colonel Conk Santa Fe bowl, Gentleman Jon alum block, Trumpers Lime Skin Food.

 

For an extra luxury, I microwave a soaked washcloth in the Santa Fe bowl (closed with the Mitchell's lid) to get a hot towel with lavender/tea tree essential oils. It also warms up the bowl so that the lather is nice and hot. I also use MRGLO (Musgo Real Glycerine Lime Oil) soap and Jack Black MP10 nourishing oil for additional lubrication.

post #65 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcodalondra View Post

Yes, I tried Acqua Di Parma shaving soap -glycerine based (I still have some) but it is greatly overpriced. It is made by the same company that made the original Figaro P.160 but it is not as good as the P.160 (tallow base). The one I have has lost all the original almond scent but it lather beautifully




Edit: may I also suggest Cella & Vitos

I beg to differ, I have the soft soaps you mentioned and a few others (Cella & TFS) and ADP provides a great shave, only second to Santa Maria Novella.
post #66 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuttingboard View Post

I beg to differ, I have the soft soaps you mentioned and a few others (Cella & TFS) and ADP provides a great shave, only second to Santa Maria Novella.
To each is own, and as you know each skin/beard type take each shaving set up in its own way. ADP is about £37 RRP in UK, and aside of the scent (which I do not care for as I use the colonias anyway) it is greatly overpriced. The original P.160 is on a league of his own, but sadly they decided to stop producing it.
post #67 of 69
I sometimes wonder how many different toothbrushes and toothpaste tubes those guys on the shaving forums have. And shampoo, nail clippers and deodorant.
It's really weird how people can be sucked into buying so much of this stuff.
You need a brush, some soap, a razor and some blades. Almost any of the soaps work fine. Ditto razors, brushes, and blades.

I'd maybe consider getting an extra set for travel, but that's it.
post #68 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

You need a brush, some soap, a razor and some blades. Almost any of the soaps work fine. Ditto razors, brushes, and blades.

I disagree.
post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

I sometimes wonder how many different toothbrushes and toothpaste tubes those guys on the shaving forums have. And shampoo, nail clippers and deodorant.
It's really weird how people can be sucked into buying so much of this stuff.
You need a brush, some soap, a razor and some blades. Almost any of the soaps work fine. Ditto razors, brushes, and blades.

I'd maybe consider getting an extra set for travel, but that's it.

I had quite a few flavors of Marvis from my last trip across the pond, but other than that no hoarding tendencies. The thing about razors and soaps is that you go through an experimenting phase and then most people eventually settle on a few favorites. Razors in particular can be prone to variation: steel content, grind, heft, age, point style - so you might go through a dozen before finding one that's just right in terms of performance and aesthetics. No different from kitchen knives, in most respects.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Health & Body
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › Shaving razors and products