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The Survivalist thread

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
As well as the 7 bottles of scotch and cognac I bought pre-storm really helped out, the 3 days of power loss offered some frustrating and got me thinking.

I went ahead an ordered a 5500W Honda Inverter style generator, since my town has very strict noise ordinance and I generally don't want to call to much attention to the fact that I will have power.

I also ordered a transfer switch so that the changeover to back-up power will be simple, I plan to wire that in ahead of the Nor'Easter approaching this week.

Next I have been doing some research on gas storage since I only had one container pre-storm leftover from my racing days. I found that the steel containers with spring loaded seals seemed to be the best reviews, I bought a stock pile of those and a long term fuel stabilizer. Enough to keep me going for about a week before I have to siphon the cars to get another week or two.

We've got plenty of glass bottled drinking water and water for toilets since there was talk of turning off the water for a period of time.

I bought 100 storm-proof 15 second burn matches, these things look unlike any matches that I have seen, they come in a resealable container

Next on the list I bought a pack of 10 industrial lighting snap-bars that will last for 12 hours each if my industrial flashlight with 3 charged batteries dies.

Rope- bought a 50 foot length of survivalist rope, who knows...

100 hour emergency candles that work on paraffin wax, set of 3. As much as I would rather use Hurricane lamps they're not really the best for this and the scented candles we were using (someones lame gift) are pretty annoying and really don't put off much light.

The survivalist style forums are really not my speed, they all seem to be a little over-board or sort of hoping for disaster to strike, what are you guys doing to help yourselves in the future?
post #2 of 12
Thread Starter 
Any experience with PTR-91 rifles?
post #3 of 12

I'd have to say that the survivalist forums, while usually a bit on the extreme side, do have very useful information. if you look at the principals that they use to pack/buy stuff they can be applied to pretty much any level of shall we say paranoia. 

 

If you live in a storm prone area I'd look at putting a cage around your windows, or at least bars. That 1. stops/slows down intruders, and 2. it stops large objects from flying through your windows. Maybe you can have one made and store them in the garage and then when you need them you can just attach them over your already boarded up window. 

 

As for alcohol, I think that while it's a comfort, out of a survivalist perspective, it's really bad. Alcohol increases your need for water AND clouds your judgement. Not a very good combo when disaster strikes. 

 

I'd also look for an escape plan. Where do you go if you can't stay at your place? What do you need in terms of supplies? Can you use your vehicle(unlikely, but still)? 

 

If you're going to get yourself some firearms, you would be needing something that has a lot of stopping power, but not really that much range like a shotgun. You don't want your bullets flying out the window and then hitting something half a mile down the street. The problems with weapons is that you have to be proficient. Don't even think about getting a firearm if you're not going to practice with it regularly so that you know beyond a shadow of a doubt that you'll be able to use them properly in a high stress situation. 

Also, IF you purchase a firearm, are you ready to shoot another human being? Are you morally and psychologically ready to be responsible for someones death/severe injury? Or just the fact that you'll be know as the guy who shot someones relative?

If you answer NO to any of these questions, then don't get a firearm. Baseball bats and the like are in most cases just as good for home defense and they usually don't end up with someone in the morgue. That's not even talking about the possible legal complications that can come with putting a bullet in someones head. 

 

Now, once you've set up your house for survival and you have all the necessary gear, what are you going to do about boredom? Once shit hits the fan you're going to be stuck inside your house for a LOOONG time, Nothing is more detrimental to your mental status than being bored. It will drive you crazy. So make sure you have something to do that you like. What that is, you ahve to figure out for yourself. Given that you've got a generator, you'll probably have electricity and thus(with some luck) internet, so I guess that alleviates a lot of your boredom issues, but if all that fails, get a plan. 

 

Relatives

So you have relatives in the potential disaster area? If so, what's the plan to stay in contact with them? How do you make sure that they are okay? Or if they aren't in the affected area, how do you tell them that you are okay? It seemed to me that most people in the "Hurricane Sandy thread" where worried about their relatives/friends because they couldn't reach them. So you might want to check out alternative ways of communicating. 

 

Plan A, B, C, D. 

What happens if your primary plan fails? Or your backup plan? Is there a backup to the backup plan? If not, then get one. A plan rarely survives reality unscathed, and while a plan can change, reality won't. So make sure you know what you should do, where your gear is, and most importantly, how to use it. 

Many people mentioned that they had friends, neighbors, etc that had trees fall down on their houses, completely demolishing them. What is your plan for that? What happens if your house(and potentially generator) are struck out by a tree? Given that such an event would leave your house open to the elements, what is your plan for keeping warm/safe? How do you make sure that you don't get crushed by the tree? All questions that should be asked and answered. 

 

Maximator

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Good thoughts, when it comes to me in particular I live in a neighborhood where bars on the windows are not going to happen. That's why instead I've been looking at laminated glass. I've seen videos of a 2x4 fired at the window at say 60 mph that did not break through the glass.

No overhanging trees to worry about, but if one of my spruce's came down on the side of the house, I would temporarily board up the effected area then chain saw it into manageable pieces after the storm is gone.

Fire is a good topic, I live in a place where the two roads that access it are easily clogged with downed trees, making an exit plan very difficult to execute. A couple halon style fire extinguishers sound like they would be good to have in various places around the house. If you couldn't stop a full on blaze, you could use them to help get out the house.
post #5 of 12
I don't prepare for a specific disaster. The reason for this is it really doesn't matter what causes the disaster that's important. It's about surviving in conditions where food, water, shelter, and the infrastructure we rely on is scarce or non existent. Basically you'll have two options, stay put or move out.

In a nutshell I have a case or two of bottled water at any given time. When that runs out I know how to find water and can purify it chemically or by filtration. I have a 60 to 90 day supply of food that's freeze dried and long term storage capable. I hike and camp a lot so buying it in bulk like this is cheaper and it serves both short term and longer term survival needs. If push comes to shove I can live indefinitely off the land where I live. I have an extensive medical kit and I'll make up a smaller more portable unit that goes with me in the field. Making fire isn't an issue either. I have a good supply of matches, a magnesium fire starter, magnifying glass and if push comes to shove I can start one with a couple of sticks and some string. Other things in my trick bag includes climbing gear, surefire flashlights with a ton of batteries, some long life candles, paracord, a fishing kit that fits in a band aid box, several changes of clothes, signaling devices, micro camp stove, Ti utensils/cookware. Anyway you get the idea. Sounds like a guy who spends too much time in the field right? Oh and guns aren't an issue. I have plenty and plenty of ammo too. If need be I'm well trained so again if push comes to shove I'll do what has to be done.

All of this stuff fits into a decent sized cedar chest and can be moved fairly quickly if need be. If it's really bad I always have a backpack that's ready to go with what I would need to survive well and in comfort in the woods for a week. Oh and I do have a second place to go to if my house/immediate area has to be vacated. It's a two day hike in good conditions, 4 in bad.

Now with all of this said in a worst case scenario I could make do with much less and still come out OK. A little training can go a long long way in that regard.

There is so much to this it isn't funny. What I have in my trick bag or box works very well for me and it's field proven. Will it work for you or the next guy who knows.
post #6 of 12

Crane, I was driving along the highway the other day and saw your sign so I stopped by the store. You could board up the windows and survive in there for a decade or so.

 

Nice shop.

 

lefty

post #7 of 12

I think what many people here tend to ignore is physical fitness. IF shit hits the fan and you have to bug out, are you fit enough(mentally and physically) to survive the ordeal? Remember that survival is VERY different from hiking. It's hiking with no determined end, you're probably cold and (after a while) hungry as hell, scared to some degree, and in a place where there is no infrastructure. 

 

In the Boy-scouts we where told that you can survive 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water, 3 minutes without air, but you won't last 3 seconds unless you have the will and determination to survive. I think this is very true. 

 

So, make sure that your body is in the same top shape as your equipment. You should also remember to train for what emergencies may happen, now what you'd expect in an ordinary situation. 

 

Maximator

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks Cranes's, I appreciate the input. As expected you are well prepared! What do you guys have in place for maintaining your homes in an emergency? And also maintaining some basic creature comforts.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Crane, I was driving along the highway the other day and saw your sign so I stopped by the store. You could board up the windows and survive in there for a decade or so.

Nice shop.

lefty

Yep, the store would be one of the first places I would be going to if it hit the fan. It's the supply depot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maximator View Post

I think what many people here tend to ignore is physical fitness. IF shit hits the fan and you have to bug out, are you fit enough(mentally and physically) to survive the ordeal? Remember that survival is VERY different from hiking. It's hiking with no determined end, you're probably cold and (after a while) hungry as hell, scared to some degree, and in a place where there is no infrastructure. 

In the Boy-scouts we where told that you can survive 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water, 3 minutes without air, but you won't last 3 seconds unless you have the will and determination to survive. I think this is very true. 

So, make sure that your body is in the same top shape as your equipment. You should also remember to train for what emergencies may happen, now what you'd expect in an ordinary situation. 

Maximator

Very true Max. I'm already fit both mentally and physically. I'm also trained in wilderness survival skills which can easily be adapted to survive in an urban environment as well. The thing is I wouldn't stay in an urban area for long in an extended disaster situation. I would head for the hills where there is little chance of running into people. It's sad to say but people are your number one threat in a disaster situation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Thanks Cranes's, I appreciate the input. As expected you are well prepared! What do you guys have in place for maintaining your homes in an emergency? And also maintaining some basic creature comforts.

I look at the house as nothing more than shelter from the elements. If it's intact great, if not the water gas and electricity get cut and I'm gone after salvaging needed supplies. I'm not sure what you mean by basic creature comforts. I'll be warm, dry and fed with a decent shelter to get out of the elements. If you're talking about things like an Ipod or a laptop to watch movies or listen to music I have that covered as well. I have a solar cell setup that recharges small devices like these. What's more important to have is a broadband radio so you can get information on the situation.

Max brought up something interesting and that's being mentally prepared. Part of that preparation is being able to keep occupied without all the gadgets, TV and so on. This isn't a problem with me thanks to my age. I grew up without all this crap that people somehow think they need. I don't get bored out in the field, there's plenty to do especially if you're trying to maintain a camp, food supply, water supply and so on.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Mentally prepared is easy for me, I can always find something to occupy that space, and as you mention if you are off in the wilderness you will find that there is much to do. The solar cell is a great idea and may find itself useful in more than just a SHTF situation.

Keeping those your with in prime mental state may be a bit more difficult.
post #11 of 12
Get something like this for your doors, they make it for for various types including sliding glass and french:

http://www.armorconcepts.com/Our-Solutions/Door-Jamb-Armor

I would also recommend 3M security film on your first floor windows, and adequate exterior lighting. Securing your doors is essential. Through the front door is how many intruders enter.

If you are preparing for an actual survival situation, anything less than a firearm will be completely worthless for protection. A baseball bat for home defense/survival? Not going to cut it. Would you want to confront someone who has 75lbs on you with a baseball bat? You might get 1 swing, if you're lucky. Personally, I would not limit yourself to a shotgun, a handgun, or a rifle. I would own one of each, at a minimum, but one is better than nothing. A lot better. They each serve their purpose, and in a true survival situation you might have to leave your home. In that case, a handgun and a shotgun become exponentially less effective, although the conceal-ability of a handgun retains its usefulness, as does the intimidation of a shotgun at close range - and the shotgun is excellent for hunting game.

You can't have enough water, or food, or ammunition. Also remember:

Medical Supplies
Vitamins
Radio/Communication
Maps
Knife
Cash (or something of value)
Liquor (the hardcore guys will tell you to barter with it)
Ammunition
Rain Gear/Waterproof Backpack
Extra Clothing - good shoes/boots/gloves/hats, etc.
Batteries
Flashlights
Candles
Lantern
Fire Starting materials (matches, lighters, striker, etc.)
Bathroom Essentials
Contractor Bags
Towels (paper and cotton)
Tape
Cord
Multi-Tool
Eating Utensils
Sleeping Bags/Tent
Survival Manual

The list could go on and on. Personally, I don't have much in storage other than in the firearm/ammo category, but plan to slowly accumulate a decent supply. If you live in a storm area I think it would be prudent to have a solid backpack that can last 3-5 days (referred to as a BOB, bug out bag). We have a lot of these items around the house, but certainly could not gather them quickly if we needed to. It's best to have something ready to go.
post #12 of 12

While physical preparation and building up supplies are very important(I myself keep a good supply of canned food at hand, and have prepared a well stocked/bug-out bag...I also never leave home without a pocket knife and a lighter). Something like this, filled with water purification tablets, metalcontainer for boiling water, a knife, a survival guide, tarps, cordage, a first aid kit, fishing line/hooks - http://www.qltyctrl.com/civvy-kit-bag/

 

 

 

 

 

...the most important tool a person can arm himself with is knowledge and resourcefulness. Being able to see multiple uses for every tool, watching tutorials for various survival skills, learning about wild-edibles/medicines...things like that.

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