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post #16 of 35
If you're going to read Mann, Buddenbrooks. BTW, and totally off subject, but why is it that every second German, Russian or Scandanavian film seems to have a scene in it in which people are sitting with impassive, suffering faces, on some form of public transportation?  Piece all those scenes together, and you'd have an advert for the California way of life.
post #17 of 35
Quote:
If you're going to read Mann, Buddenbrooks. BTW, and totally off subject, but why is it that every second German, Russian or Scandanavian film seems to have a scene in it in which people are sitting with impassive, suffering faces, on some form of public transportation?  Piece all those scenes together, and you'd have an advert for the California way of life.
Very true, lol.
post #18 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
BTW, and totally off subject, but why is it that every second German, Russian or Scandanavian film seems to have a scene in it in which people are sitting with impassive, suffering faces, on some form of public transportation?  Piece all those scenes together, and you'd have an advert for the California way of life.
haha, not so much concerned about the off-subject as much as I'm wondering about where that came from.
post #19 of 35
My Favoites: Sirens of Titan Slaughter House Five Cat's Cradle... all by Kurt Vonnegut Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy To Kill A Mockingbird More.. I can't remember
post #20 of 35
Quote:
If you're going to read Mann, Buddenbrooks. BTW, and totally off subject, but why is it that every second German, Russian or Scandanavian film seems to have a scene in it in which people are sitting with impassive, suffering faces, on some form of public transportation?  Piece all those scenes together, and you'd have an advert for the California way of life.
la guy, i haven't seen many german or russian films, as i'm partial to spanish, italian, and french cinema (i'm over my swedish/bergman phase), but where did that comment come from? i don't get it. thracozaag, was it andre gide who said, "trust those who seek truth. don't trust those who find it." i think that was the quote from truffaut's the soft skin.
post #21 of 35
Quote:
Have anyone read "The Protestant Establishment"
No, but what's with your obsession with old money?
post #22 of 35
Quote:
If you're going to read Mann, Buddenbrooks.
One of my favorites - gets better the more times you read it. I particularly like the use of leitmotif for each character - so musical. I'll add something humorous: Decline and Fall, by Evelyn Waugh
post #23 of 35
Excellent choice. I also love Brideshead, and A Handful of Dust, along with Scoop.
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Quote:
If you're going to read Mann, Buddenbrooks. BTW, and totally off subject, but why is it that every second German, Russian or Scandanavian film seems to have a scene in it in which people are sitting with impassive, suffering faces, on some form of public transportation?  Piece all those scenes together, and you'd have an advert for the California way of life.
la guy, i haven't seen many german or russian films, as i'm partial to spanish, italian, and french cinema (i'm over my swedish/bergman phase), but where did that comment come from? i don't get it. thracozaag, was it andre gide who said, "trust those who seek truth. don't trust those who find it." i think that was the quote from truffaut's the soft skin.
I believe you're correct on that, Matador.
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Excellent choice.  I also love Brideshead, and A Handful of Dust, along with Scoop.
Another Waugh fan. Less popular, but well-written nevertheless: "The Loved One" (excellent send-up of California, well LA) and "Black Mischief" (my favorite part was the 'Birth Control Gala').
post #26 of 35
Quote:
No, but what's with your obsession with old money
I wasnt aware I was obsessed with Old Money. It's an interesting book that doesn't soley cover the topic of Old Money.It observes the power thats WASP had in America and why they were losing it.
post #27 of 35
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Quote:
Excellent choice.  I also love Brideshead, and A Handful of Dust, along with Scoop.
Another Waugh fan. Less popular, but well-written nevertheless: "The Loved One" (excellent send-up of California, well LA) and "Black Mischief" (my favorite part was the 'Birth Control Gala').
I'll have to check out the Loved One, thanks.
post #28 of 35
"Hamlet"
post #29 of 35
Thread Starter 
If anyone here is a linguist or just interested in studying oddities of Anglophones, I suggest Crazy English by Richard Lederer. I recently read it and found it very amusing.
post #30 of 35
Matador:  With your handle, I always took you for a fan of Papa. Not surprising you like Death in the Afternoon. A fabulous piece of sports writing. I'm surprised no one here mentioned Graham Greene. He's like one of the most profound, prolific writers in teh English language of that last century.  Quiet American and The Comedians are two of the best, but really any of his books are great, and he wrote hundreds.
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