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Official: STAR WARS THREAD. These are the droids you're looking for. **WARNING MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS!** - Page 130

post #1936 of 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

Hah. I love the part were he calls them out for seemingly not even had watched the movie at all. It's a point I've brought up a couple times in this thread after banging my head against the wall at reading numerous complaints for this that were spelled out in the movie if one bothered to even pay the f**** attention.

The one they missed was, "why did Han go on that bridge? He's saavy enough to know that's a bad idea." Once again the answer is, "watch the movie."

Why did Han give Chewie the detonator? Was it possibly because he expected to die, or at least thought it was a distinct possibility?
post #1937 of 2848

Jr, while part of a larger storyline the individual LotR movies stood very well on their own and were a satisfying watch. It might be a little easier to do as we all knew where the story was going, but the filmmaking in those movies was far superior to this one.

 

Looking forward, I am curious as to the first conversation between Luke and Rey - pretty much assuming that she's his daughter. Past that I don't really care about Ren, Poe or Finn. That's a fault of the movie.

 

lefty

post #1938 of 2848
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

The only reason? What is this based on? Whatever expectation Lucas did or didn't have at the time, doesn't that film now stand as pretty powerful evidence disproving your thesis? That is, it is entirely possible to create a movie that feels like good relatively self-contained story-telling even if it's a single chapter in a broader narrative?

Ok sure "only reason" is strong wording, but he certainly didn't know it would be successful. No one did. Go read up on how blind sided by the film's success everyone was. They had almost no toys ready to sell that season because they were not confident they would even sell. It was a huge success out of no where. So yes Lucas wrote the movie as more of a self contained narrative then any of the other SW films. This includes the prequels. So my overall point stands.
post #1939 of 2848
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Van Veen View Post

The one they missed was, "why did Han go on that bridge? He's saavy enough to know that's a bad idea." Once again the answer is, "watch the movie."

Why did Han give Chewie the detonator? Was it possibly because he expected to die, or at least thought it was a distinct possibility?

He also missed that the film calls out why Han was in the general area when he discovers the MF. He didn't know the exact place, but had a good enough idea that it was around that planet to not be flying blindly half across the universe.
post #1940 of 2848
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Jr, while part of a larger storyline the individual LotR movies stood very well on their own and were a satisfying watch. It might be a little easier to do as we all knew where the story was going, but the filmmaking in those movies was far superior to this one.

Looking forward, I am curious as to the first conversation between Luke and Rey - pretty much assuming that she's his daughter. Past that I don't really care about Ren, Poe or Finn. That's a fault of the movie.

lefty

I know we will disagree, but I felt this movie also stood very well on it's own and provided a satisfying experience. They don't fully explain Rey, but ANH didn't explain how Luke just happened to be powerful in the force either. He blew up the deathstar with it afterall. A one in a million shot. The big difference is this film has the main character using the force more than did in that film.
post #1941 of 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

Ok sure "only reason" is strong wording, but he certainly didn't know it would be successful. No one did. Go read up on how blind sided by the film's success everyone was. They had almost no toys ready to sell that season because they were not confident they would even sell. It was a huge success out of no where. So yes Lucas wrote the movie as more of a self contained narrative then any of the other SW films. This includes the prequels. So my overall point stands.

Sorry, it doesn't at all. What it does suggest is that if your investment is marketing it as a franchise and selling toys, that can be a crutch that leads you to tell tight story-telling under the bus. It may be a natural reaction, but not an inevitable one. There's no reason one couldn't approach the writing, directing, and editing of the current film as though it were supposed to stand alone as a narrative.

Go read up on basic primers for writers, be it novelists, screenwriters, etc. Even if you're writing a television pilot, one of the most fundamental pieces of advice is to have the single-episode narrative hold together as a single viewing experience. Of course there's going to be other stuff that won't get revealed or fully developed until later episodes, but that shouldn't be a catch-all excuse for everything (one should always be suspicious of arguments that prove to much). That's a big difference between the experience of watching a well-crafted episodic narrative and, say, cheesy soap operas or Dynasty or Falcon Crest or whatever.
post #1942 of 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

OMG! You mean I have to sit through two more of these hobbit movies to see them defeat that giant flaming eye and dispose of the ring? ffffuuuu.gif

You could torrent Dildo Saggins and fast forward to the last 2 minutes
post #1943 of 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

I know we will disagree, but I felt this movie also stood very well on it's own and provided a satisfying experience. They don't fully explain Rey, but ANH didn't explain how Luke just happened to be powerful in the force either. He blew up the deathstar with it afterall. A one in a million shot. The big difference is this film has the main character using the force more than did in that film.

Obi-Wan's ghost was helping him with the force. Luke did not do that on his own.
post #1944 of 2848
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

Sorry, it doesn't at all. What it does suggest is that if your investment is marketing it as a franchise and selling toys, that can be a crutch that leads you to tell tight story-telling under the bus. It may be a natural reaction, but not an inevitable one. There's no reason one couldn't approach the writing, directing, and editing of the current film as though it were supposed to stand alone as a narrative.

Go read up on basic primers for writers, be it novelists, screenwriters, etc. Even if you're writing a television pilot, one of the most fundamental pieces of advice is to have the single-episode narrative hold together as a single viewing experience. Of course there's going to be other stuff that won't get revealed or fully developed until later episodes, but that shouldn't be a catch-all excuse for everything (one should always be suspicious of arguments that prove to much). That's a big difference between the experience of watching a well-crafted episodic narrative and, say, cheesy soap operas or Dynasty or Falcon Crest or whatever.


How do you feel about Empire Strikes Back?
post #1945 of 2848
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harold falcon View Post

Obi-Wan's ghost was helping him with the force. Luke did not do that on his own.

Obi-Wan's ghost spoke to Ray in her force vision. smile.gif
post #1946 of 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

How do you feel about Empire Strikes Back?

I'm sure I liked it less than SW, but I'm not sure I've seen it since I was 12 years old. Aside from seeing some bastardized version of ROTJ on TV years ago, I don't think I've ever re-watched any of them other than the original and Spaceballs.
post #1947 of 2848
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

Sorry, it doesn't at all. What it does suggest is that if your investment is marketing it as a franchise and selling toys, that can be a crutch that leads you to tell tight story-telling under the bus. It may be a natural reaction, but not an inevitable one. There's no reason one couldn't approach the writing, directing, and editing of the current film as though it were supposed to stand alone as a narrative.

Go read up on basic primers for writers, be it novelists, screenwriters, etc. Even if you're writing a television pilot, one of the most fundamental pieces of advice is to have the single-episode narrative hold together as a single viewing experience. Of course there's going to be other stuff that won't get revealed or fully developed until later episodes, but that shouldn't be a catch-all excuse for everything (one should always be suspicious of arguments that prove to much). That's a big difference between the experience of watching a well-crafted episodic narrative and, say, cheesy soap operas or Dynasty or Falcon Crest or whatever.


Also I must ask, but you saw this movie correct? Because I don't see how anyone could say it doesn't hold together as a single viewing experience. It told a complete story. The things many are complaining about is the stuff that isn't going to be revealed till one of the two future installments of this trilogy, which you admit is acceptable. So it sounds like we are in agreement.
post #1948 of 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

I'm sure I liked it less than SW, but I'm not sure I've seen it since I was 12 years old. Aside from seeing some bastardized version of ROTJ on TV years ago, I don't think I've ever re-watched any of them other than the original and Spaceballs.

You're missing out, man. Empire was great.
post #1949 of 2848
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

I'm sure I liked it less than SW, but I'm not sure I've seen it since I was 12 years old. Aside from seeing some bastardized version of ROTJ on TV years ago, I don't think I've ever re-watched any of them other than the original and Spaceballs.

Well as I have pointed out a few times in this thread ESB is by and large the most beloved film in the Star Wars franchise and it ends on a cliffhanger. The movie is so good, that I have seen people add it to "best of" lists completely separate from the franchise as a whole. It's a masterfully crafted film yet leaves leaves a lot of open questions that needed to answered when it ends.
post #1950 of 2848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

Well as I have pointed out a few times in this thread ESB is by and large the most beloved film in the Star Wars franchise and it ends on a cliffhanger. The movie is so good, that I have seen people add it to "best of" lists completely separate from the franchise as a whole. It's a masterfully crafted film yet leaves leaves a lot of open questions that needed to answered when it ends.

Well, you guys are doing a pretty good job of convincing me that I need to go back and watch it at some point Like I said, I'm not sure I've seen it since the original theatrical release.
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