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Shoes and cold states (Michigan, Alaska, Canada and so on) - Page 2

post #16 of 38
In and out of a vehicle or for a short walk I wear a derby boot with Ridgeway sole irrespective of temperature if I am wearing a suit or odd jacket.
post #17 of 38

When it gets very cold, safety becomes much more important.  When it hits that -40 and lower, it's time to bust out the military surplus bunny boots they issue to guys pulling duty in the arctic.  I found mine NOS still wrapped up USMC from 1950.  

post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by benjclark View Post

When it gets very cold, safety becomes much more important.  When it hits that -40 and lower, it's time to bust out the military surplus bunny boots they issue to guys pulling duty in the arctic.  I found mine NOS still wrapped up USMC from 1950.  

Definitely if it becomes uncomfortable, I wouldn't recommend it, but I've always managed to get by with my Redwings and thick socks on 5 degrees F (-15 C) days.
post #19 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsugsu View Post

How are you going to wear them? In and out of a vehicle or short walks versus trudging long distances on foot?
Out of the vehicle. Trudging long distances.
post #20 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Putonghua73 View Post

The recent inclement weather in London [rain], plus last Spring's washout has got me seriously pondering options for dealing with rain, as opposed to snow.
I'm thinking along the lines of a burgundy / oxblood shell cordovan derby with dainite soles. I prefer a more sleak look, hence derbies as opposed to chukkas. The ideal - but expensive - solution would be a pair of oxfords and a pair of derby's in shell cordovan with dainite soles.
Rain is my main fear, as opposed to snow and slush.
Right now what I'm trying to do is to buy some burgundy or oxblood warm shoes with the fur inside for cold weather. The task seems to be impossible as I see only black or brown colors around.
post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_sulks View Post


Right now what I'm trying to do is to buy some burgundy or oxblood warm shoes with the fur inside for cold weather. The task seems to be impossible as I see only black or brown colors around.

When it's that cold you wear valenki. Buy some galoshi to wear over them if it's a wet cold or dirty in the city.

post #22 of 38
For below zero conditions where I am trudging through snow I wear a form of valenki though more structured. A filzstiefel or felt boot. Goodyear storm welted, Vibram sole, leather boot with wool felt shaft. Can also get them shearling lined. Good to about -30 Celsius. You can extend the comfort range by using different types or combinations of wool felt or shearling insoles. I wear Diemme but there are many makers that do them including Ludwig Reiter.

Fritzl says traditional winter boot for Austrians is a black scotch grain Norweger on Vibram with or without shearling lining.

I think Edward Green does a shearling lined Galway. Can't remember if it is on a Ridgeway or Dainite. Also can't remember if it is RTW or MTO. Good combination of form and function but you would not wear them inside.

Beyond -30 I wear a Steiger mukluk which has the wool felt liner like a Sorel boot but is far lighter. You can go up in size and width to add additional liners and felt and/or shearling insoles. This boot will serve you well if you are outside all day in frigid temperatures or walking to the arctic circle. Not so good for wearing around town with your suit.

At some point, style does go out the window when it is extremely cold.
post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsugsu View Post
At some point, style does go out the window when it is extremely cold.

This. This X 1000.

post #24 of 38
As was mentioned, the main offenders in winter time are the snow itself, as well as the salt and sludge crap that builds up as the roads are salted and sanded.

I used to keep my shoes at work and wear boots for the trip, but have since taken to wearing rubber overshoes for any excursions outdoors.
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michigan Planner View Post

I have a pair of Bean Boots for when it is particularly snowy or slushy.

This has been what I've done in recent years, got a pair of the LL.Bean Khatadin Iron workers, give them a good wipe down and apply some Obenaufs Heavy Duty LP at the start and once in the middle of the season when they get really salty and a little beat up. Change into my nice shoes once I get to the office. They're on their fourth year and still going strong, with warm socks they're fine to -20 C or so for reasonable periods of time outside, but if it's colder or you're out all day long you'll want something with a liner. Like others have said the real kicker is the salt.
post #26 of 38

Any boots warm enough to protect your feet from meaningful exposure to that kind of cold will be far to warm to wear indoors. So you will have to change into conventional shoes once you get inside. That being the case, avoid frostbite and get boots made for severe cold. These will be big, insulated, but not necessarily heavy. Waterproof bottoms are a good idea in case the cold is accompanied by slush or freezing rain. In cold areas no one expects people to trudge through snow and salty slush in dress shoes.

post #27 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCPhoto View Post

give them a good wipe down and apply some Obenaufs Heavy Duty LP at the start and once in the middle of the season
Very interesting. Don't you have to wash your outdoors shoes every day to wipe the dirt away. I have to wipe my shoes down every day (especially if it is slushy outside).
post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_sulks View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JCPhoto View Post

give them a good wipe down and apply some Obenaufs Heavy Duty LP at the start and once in the middle of the season
Very interesting. Don't you have to wash your outdoors shoes every day to wipe the dirt away. I have to wipe my shoes down every day (especially if it is slushy outside).

You wear these over the shoe.

http://tinyurl.com/aoer25r

 

And some heavier high quality wool socks that are worsted and feel like cotton. Your feet will always be comfortable, the wool regulates temperature even in a hot office.

 

If it's really cold then get some heated socks.
 

post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by House View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_sulks View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JCPhoto View Post

give them a good wipe down and apply some Obenaufs Heavy Duty LP at the start and once in the middle of the season
Very interesting. Don't you have to wash your outdoors shoes every day to wipe the dirt away. I have to wipe my shoes down every day (especially if it is slushy outside).

You wear these over the shoe.

http://tinyurl.com/aoer25r

 

And some heavier high quality wool socks that are worsted and feel like cotton. Your feet will always be comfortable, the wool regulates temperature even in a hot office.

 

If it's really cold then get some heated socks.
 

These are good too over wool socks

 

http://store.tretorn.com/arsta-vinter-mens-winter-boots-black/p/47234005/

 

Carry some light slipons or keep a pair at the office. Don't make life difficult with old fashioned fugly lace up shoes left over from the late Victorian uptight days.200 years ago upper class men wore Gucci type slipons perhaps decorated with a buckle or bit.

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by House View Post

You wear these over the shoe.
http://tinyurl.com/aoer25r

And some heavier high quality wool socks that are worsted and feel like cotton. Your feet will always be comfortable, the wool regulates temperature even in a hot office.

If it's really cold then get some heated socks.

 

I no longer live in a cold climate. But I grew up in suburban Chicago - so I know from cold, slush and salt.

Those zip up overshoes make complete sense to me. Those silly 'swims' that everyone around here seems to love might be good for a drizzle - but for 'normal' winter conditions including salt and grimy slush they are useless.

Rubber zip up overshoes are great - good protection - easy on and off - stretchy rubber fits over all sorts of shoe shapes. No insulation is about the only drawback. I used to pull heavy wool socks OVER my dress shoes before putting on boots - protected the shoes from scuffing and provided extra insulation.
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