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Dress like James Bond, and move like him. - Page 2

post #16 of 43

Assuming just for a second that the OP is not a troll... you do know that there were around 60 identical suits made just for the opening sequence of Skyfall? You cannot move like Bond in any suit of this kind, even the best bespoke. They are not designed for it. You can get suits made that are designed for movement, and these are of two kinds: the traditional, tough country suits in hard-wearing materials that have special features for movement especially around the shoulders - but these will really not look like you expect a modern suit to look; or alternatively, you can go for the stretchy non-SF approved type (CK wool and lycra etc.). That's it: I'm afraid Bond isn't real.

post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by peasant View Post

I've browsed the forums a few times, but what finally made me sign up was the Skyfall trailer ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kw1UVovByw , for those who have not seen it).

 

I recently started wearing suits more, and though I love the way I look, every one I wear has the same problem.  The shoulders are binding.

 

All of my suits are traditional, American cuts (the brands are Men's Warehouse, Jones New York, and Joseph A. Bank), altered to fit my body.  I think the problem is with the suits I buy, but I don't know what to look for to solve it.

 

So to get to my question, why is it that James Bond can fight a guy on top of a train in his suit, but I cannot reach across a bar without my suit shoulders binding?

 

The second part of the question, is there something I can do to my current suits to make them work?

 

And last, what can I do to get suits that will fit me, allow that range of motion, and not cost an insane amount?

 

Thanks for the help!

...because James Bond is a character in a movie. The "fight" that you see is really a combination of takes, pieced together. Not to mention, the actor's wardrobe was made with those scenes in mind. A lot of times, the actors have "costumes" that were specifically made for those takes.

 

If you want suits that are less restrictive, then you should do a better job of assessing them while you're trying them on. Some cuts just don't work for everyone. As far as your second question goes, there's not much that you can do about the shoulders and huge armholes on those Jos. A Bank/Men's Wearhouse suits. At least it was a learning experience.


Edited by VinnyMac - 11/6/12 at 5:39pm
post #18 of 43
And you realize that they have like 50+ MTM suits for the film right? if he's fighting on the train and rips one he can just replace it with a new one and carry on filming, if us mortals go and rip a TF/Brioni suit we are pretty shit out of luck. But if you are talking about just range of motion then as another poster has stated higher armholes you should PM a poster here named Svenn he's been posting/ trying out different ways to get as much mobility as possible.
post #19 of 43

We live in the possibility of dressing and moving like Bond don't we? But it would be really nice to have all those custom suits for free though!

post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by anginaprinzmetal View Post

do not feed the troll

Or you could, you know, not be a jerk about it. He's not trying to be James Bond, he's using his inspiration for dressing well (James Bond) as a segue into his questions about suited mobility.

 

To the OP: I'm told higher armholes are a wondrous thing. Of course, it'll still be more constricting than, say, an odd vest and dress shirt, but we must all make sacrifices at the alter of style.

post #21 of 43

I actually asked my tailor about this several years ago (for dancing purposes, not for spy purposes).  His answer was that regular suit jackets couldn't both look right and give you much mobility.  The way the arms attach to the body of the jacket, specifically, means that you can raise and lower your arms freely parallel to your body, but raising them perpendicularly would always be somewhat restricted.

 

I later learned that actual ballroom dancers that you see in competitions or on TV wear "tail suits," which look like suits from a distance, but which are quite different in reality - they are mostly made of somewhat stretchy material, and they are fastened quite differently from a real suit.  The front and back of the shirt often snap underneath the crotch (like a baby's "onesie") to keep the shirt tucked in, and sometimes the front of the jacket will have a hidden button to attach it to the shirt so it doesn't swing open.  I've forgotten some of the other details the tail suits have.    But you cant get that level of mobility in a regular suit. 

post #22 of 43

fred astaire moved fine.

post #23 of 43

To be able to move the arms in a fight increase the yoke on the shirt and suit itself. That was my main problem in off the rack, slim fitting shirts, so I had to get MTM to increase the yoke.  I can push press 135lbs with my suit on...no rips though I cant bench press.

post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by wimsey View Post

I actually asked my tailor about this several years ago (for dancing purposes, not for spy purposes).  His answer was that regular suit jackets couldn't both look right and give you much mobility.  The way the arms attach to the body of the jacket, specifically, means that you can raise and lower your arms freely parallel to your body, but raising them perpendicularly would always be somewhat restricted.

I later learned that actual ballroom dancers that you see in competitions or on TV wear "tail suits," which look like suits from a distance, but which are quite different in reality - they are mostly made of somewhat stretchy material, and they are fastened quite differently from a real suit.  The front and back of the shirt often snap underneath the crotch (like a baby's "onesie") to keep the shirt tucked in, and sometimes the front of the jacket will have a hidden button to attach it to the shirt so it doesn't swing open.  I've forgotten some of the other details the tail suits have.    But you cant get that level of mobility in a regular suit. 

Im not so sure about the stretchy material. Your tailor is correct in saying the suits worn for theater productions/dancing competitions are slightly different but If i remember correctly it was necessarily the material but rather a very high armhole coupled with excess fabric somewhere (sorry i can picture this in my head but can't remember what its called) which looks strange when stationary but normal and allows for a much greater range of movement when dancing.
post #25 of 43
Are you in the mob? Why would anyone need to run/fight in a suit?
post #26 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraiche View Post

Are you in the mob? Why would anyone need to run/fight in a suit?

Maybe he lives in Detroit?

post #27 of 43
Most answers so far have been pretty unhelpful. Yes, Astaire wore one-off suits that served the purpose of giving his arms maximum movability -- suits that were unwearable outside that context -- but I get the feeling that OP's concern is more quotidian. What he's looking for, I think, is high armholes, minimal shoulder padding and as loose a fit as his preference allows.
post #28 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivar View Post

Most answers so far have been pretty unhelpful. Yes, Astaire wore one-off suits that served the purpose of giving his arms maximum movability -- suits that were unwearable outside that context -- but I get the feeling that OP's concern is more quotidian. What he's looking for, I think, is high armholes, minimal shoulder padding and as loose a fit as his preference allows.

 

I think this is what I am looking for.  But, I am rather inexperienced when it comes to shopping for suits (which apparently is a horrible crime around here, in spite of the fact that I am trying to learn). So, even if I found all of these things, I am not sure I would recognize these qualities.  Can you suggest any lines/brands/styles that I may be able to find locally to try them on and get a feel these features, and possibly purchase to add to my wardrobe?

 

Thank you for finally taking time to look into the question.

post #29 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by peasant View Post

I think this is what I am looking for.  But, I am rather inexperienced when it comes to shopping for suits (which apparently is a horrible crime around here, in spite of the fact that I am trying to learn). So, even if I found all of these things, I am not sure I would recognize these qualities.  Can you suggest any lines/brands/styles that I may be able to find locally to try them on and get a feel these features, and possibly purchase to add to my wardrobe?

Thank you for finally taking time to look into the question.

Not at all. Being European, I might not be the best person to call on for help. But If I were you, I'd probably visit some high-end store such as Barneys, Neiman Marcus or Bergdorf Goodman and ask one of the SAs for help. Now, whatever suit you're introduced to will probably cost a good deal more than you're willing to churn out, but the experience will likely give you a better feel for what separates the good stuff from the bad.
post #30 of 43

You probab;y need a bunch of elastic fabrics in the suits to be able to move like James Bond. A regular wool custom suit just wouldn't cut it now.

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