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Is my coworker right? - Page 3

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff13007 View Post

Well the important question is does he have a choice weather he can to go or not? If he is being forced to go then its a bit unreasonable for him to stomach the cost. I do agree with you that every man should own at least one Tuxedo but the fact is that majority of the people today even in those industries don't. I have several friends that work at client facing roles in the big banks here in NYC some wear suits everyday and get invited to these things regularly but even they don't own a tux and usually just wear a black suit with a black tie to those things.


Whether or not he has a "choice" is debatable. It sounds like one of those things that he could back out of if he wanted, but it could potentially hurt his long-term career prospects if he did.

post #32 of 49

+1 for sucking it up and paying. just part of business.
 

post #33 of 49
I'm guessing he's paid well enough, he should just pay for it. It's not that big of a deal. However, if he wants to try expensing it, let him try.
post #34 of 49
This sounds to me a personal issue with your colleague, really nothing to do with you. If he wants to try to get reimbursed, that's his prerogative. Ditto if he wants to play by the unwritten rules or not. Look at it this way, this is a chance to leave your colleague in the dust. Let him dig his own grave if submitting the expense will pile on.
post #35 of 49
Honestly I can't believe such thinking was from an adult. I hope the guy is not serious.
post #36 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfluous View Post

I'm guessing he's paid well enough, he should just pay for it. It's not that big of a deal. However, if he wants to try expensing it, let him try.
the man is certainly well compensated enough to purchase a very nice tuxedo, but is just innately cheap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CousinDonuts View Post

This sounds to me a personal issue with your colleague, really nothing to do with you. If he wants to try to get reimbursed, that's his prerogative. Ditto if he wants to play by the unwritten rules or not. Look at it this way, this is a chance to leave your colleague in the dust. Let him dig his own grave if submitting the expense will pile on.

I still respect the guy as a coworker (he is good at his job), but true, at some point, I'm gonna have to let him hose himself.
post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamSpade View Post

Bullshit. The guy is absolutely right - there is no good reason to force anyone to incur a completely suprfluous expense as black tie attire (the post doesn't make it clear if it is a "black tie required event"). I would imagine that dude has a regular suit which would be appropriate for virtually any occasion. If a suit isn't enough for the boss, then they should cover his cost.

 

It depends on if the attendance was optional and how common such events are for this guy in the course of work.

 

If such an event is not common, and the invitation is optional, then he should just decline to go.

 

If it's not common and participation is required, then an argument could be made he should be reimbursed.

 

If such as event is very common for work, and it's expected he should go, then a tuxedo would simply be considered normal work clothes he buy himself.

 

Also, if he's deep well into six figures ($US)/year, just buy a tux. 

post #38 of 49

time to submit an expense report for my 2013 apparel budget

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

Honestly I can't believe such thinking was from an adult. I hope the guy is not serious.

... and this ^
post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jt10000 View Post

It depends on if the attendance was optional and how common such events are for this guy in the course of work.

If such an event is not common, and the invitation is optional, then he should just decline to go.

If it's not common and participation is required, then an argument could be made he should be reimbursed.

If such as event is very common for work, and it's expected he should go, then a tuxedo would simply be considered normal work clothes he buy himself.

Also, if he's deep well into six figures ($US)/year, just buy a tux. 

This sums up my take on the whole business to perfection. From what I gather of the specifics of the situation, he should just buy the damn tux, especially since, as many others in this thread have pointed out, they can be had quite cheaply from outfits like JAB...and he evidently has ample means.
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jt10000 View Post

It depends on if the attendance was optional and how common such events are for this guy in the course of work.

If such an event is not common, and the invitation is optional, then he should just decline to go.

If it's not common and participation is required, then an argument could be made he should be reimbursed.

If such as event is very common for work, and it's expected he should go, then a tuxedo would simply be considered normal work clothes he buy himself.

Also, if he's deep well into six figures ($US)/year, just buy a tux. 

This sums up my take on the whole business to perfection. From what I gather of the specifics of the situation, he should just buy the damn tux, especially since, as many others in this thread have pointed out, they can be had quite cheaply from outfits like JAB...and he evidently has ample means.

+1
post #42 of 49
If he is being compelled (however politely or loosely) to attend to entertain the company's outside guests then the company must pay. If it is PURELY an internal event with no outsiders then he should pay. However the issue them will be that attendance is deemed necessary to demonstrate loyalty: If that is so then the invitation policy is wrong.
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jt10000 View Post

 

It depends on if the attendance was optional and how common such events are for this guy in the course of work.

 

If such an event is not common, and the invitation is optional, then he should just decline to go.

 

If it's not common and participation is required, then an argument could be made he should be reimbursed.

 

If such as event is very common for work, and it's expected he should go, then a tuxedo would simply be considered normal work clothes he buy himself.

 

Also, if he's deep well into six figures ($US)/year, just buy a tux. 

 

This.

 

Which I think is basically also your opinion, Quadcammer, no?

post #44 of 49
It will look very bad if he submits a form to be reimbursed for a fairly inexpensive tux rental. Snobby shops will look down their nose and blacklist you for such a thing. Whether or not it should be that way is another matter, and not that relevant ...
post #45 of 49
This guy needs to just buy the tux. He took the position knowing that this kind of thing is a possibility. He should consider himself lucky that he is being asked to join such a high profile event for the firm, and that he will get to network with the types of folks that frequent those events. This is a good thing for his career.

Does he try to expense his suits for work? I don't see this as being too different.
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