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Breaking-in new shoes - Page 2

post #16 of 60
Best fitting shoes I own are Sutor Mantellassi. First time I tried putting them on, I could barely get my foot in. They felt very tight at first, later that same day they opened up nicely. Currently, they fit like a glove, are as comfortable to my feet as 36D breasts are to my face and they have the best fitting heels of any of the RTW shoes I own. I feel like it's my birthday whenever Lance gets a new shipment in. If only that bastard gdl203 hadn't taken the wholecuts
post #17 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
Best fitting shoes I own are Sutor Mantellassi. First time I tried putting them on, I could barely get my foot in. They felt very tight at first, later that same day they opened up nicely. Currently, they fit like a glove, are as comfortable to my feet as 36D breasts are to my face and they have the best fitting heels of any of the RTW shoes I own. I feel like it's my birthday whenever Lance gets a new shipment in. If only that bastard gdl203 hadn't taken the wholecuts

/\\ /\\
post #18 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
Currently, they fit like a glove, are as comfortable to my feet as 36D breasts are to my face and they have the best fitting heels of any of the RTW shoes I own.

TMI

Are those Mantellassi's perky or pillowy soft? I prefer light cushioning on the heel bed.
post #19 of 60
[quote=norcaltransplant;446265][quote=edmorel;446239]Currently, they fit like a glove, are as comfortable to my feet as 36D breasts are to my face and they have the best fitting heels of any of the RTW shoes I own.
Quote:

TMI

Are those Mantellassi's perky or pillowy soft? I prefer light cushioning on the heel bed.


They have that perfect "soft yet firm" consistency. Perfectly round, great hand......
oh, wait a minute, we're talking about shoes
post #20 of 60
why do you guys like to wear shoes that initially tight that way?

i always go with a shoe which size always feel perfectly comfortable on my feet from the beginning.

if they are tight and then loosen up later does not that just mean that the leather on the shoe just gave up due to the enormity of the foot inside?
post #21 of 60
Good leather has a very high capacity for stretching while maintaining integrity. Leather that has stretched to fit around your body will obviously fit more correctly than leather that has never needed to stretch to fit. Ironically, a shoe that fits snugly and breaks in will end up with less unsightly wrinkles across the vamp.

Edit: also, there is the matter of the cork footbed that gets impacted by your bodyweight over the break-in period, thus also loosening the fit somewhat from when they were new.
post #22 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by diorshoe View Post
i always go with a shoe which size always feel perfectly comfortable on my feet from the beginning.


that's how I've always approached it. The salesman line of "oh new shoes always feel tight, they'll get more comfortable" never sat well with me. And I've never noticed my shoes getting noticeably bigger due to stretching
post #23 of 60
Thread Starter 
A good point was made about trying on shoes in the store. Taking those few steps do not guarantee choosing well fitted shoes. It could very well be that the last in question does not fit the wearer. Sometimes, the length may be right, but the width is too narrow, and vice versa. All my shoes have stretched over time. Shoes stretch more or less depending on the quality of leather used, and also the type (calf, cordovan etc).
post #24 of 60
also...when they stretch around the toe box area, do they not ruin the overall look of the shoe somewhat? I know that happened w/ a pair of my most comfortable shoes: Tight at first but loosened to fit perfectly. However little toe area pokes out a little compared to original fit (ugly)
post #25 of 60
Thread Starter 
My baby toes stick out a little also on narrow lasts when I size the length right. If I take a half size longer, that problem disappears but I end up with a longer shoe. The solution might be to take a wider shoe, but many makers don't make more than a standard E width.
post #26 of 60
The major problem today with getting the right fit is having a sales person who is a qualified shoe fitter. Unfortunately, most are not and this leads to incorrect fitting shoes. First of all, every time you shop for shoes you should ask the sales person to measure your foot with a Brannock device. This will assure you that the fitter is qualified if he/she can determine your size correctly. Second, your foot will vary in size and shape depending on what time of day it is or if you have a problem swelling of your feet according to some ailment you might be experiencing. Always, the best and only measurement is the ball to heel measurement first, then the width is determined by the device. Always keep this axiom in mind, [b]"Not every shoe is for everybody".[b] This has been a truth that I have had to express to a willing client to disregard the purchase because of the inevitable discomfort they will experience. I have been fitting footwear for more than thirty years and never allowed a customer to make a final decission on their selections until they have experienced the fit for at least a week of sporadic wear in the comfort of their home. I suggest that they wear the shoes in the morning, on a rug of course, and in the evening while sitting or standing. Yes, one can almost determine when a shoe fits great at the time of purchase but there is always the chance that your foot could be at its smallest size. Also, feet are always changing in size, usually getting bigger over time(If only other parts of our body would follow suit) so don't forget to get an update on your correct size from time to time. As for trying footwear at home for a duration. If a store or sales person will not allow to do this, move on, they are not interested in your comfort or continued business. Best Regards, Gary
post #27 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Seconded on double soles. The first few wearings are agony. It takes a while to soften up the "hinge" point in the sole. In the meantime (among other problems), your foot will lift inside the shoe and your heel will rub, causing blisters.

Ditto. Misery unless managed carefully! I find that some moleskin really helps at the beginning.
post #28 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Seconded on double soles. The first few wearings are agony. It takes a while to soften up the "hinge" point in the sole. In the meantime (among other problems), your foot will lift inside the shoe and your heel will rub, causing blisters.

Heavy or Double soled shoes should be addresed by the sales person selling you the shoes. A sole of this kind should be "broken" before the shoe is tried on. This is simply done by placing the shoe on a solid surface, pulling back the tongue and inserting your fist to the footbed at where the ball of the foot would land. Now lift the toe back a few times to simulate the flex at that point. Never just hold the shoe in your hands and flex without putting your hand inside for this could force the shoe to break in an inappropriate spot. You might still experience some heel lift after performing this task but it will minimal to what you will encounter if it is not performed.

Best Regards,

Gary
post #29 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by norcaltransplant View Post
I've found that the wet sock trick is great for shoes that are slightly too narrow through the toe box. Wearing them for an hour or two with the socks in place is far better than most stretching services, which tend to stretch shoes through the entire forefoot in addition to the pressure point. I've tried to cull most of my mediocre fitting shoes from the wardobe.

My break-in pattern usually includes a few hours around the apartment to create some wear in the corkbed and to soften the soles a bit. Double soles can wear like boards for their first few outings*. Same goes for Dainite soles.


*Disclaimer: As a New Yorker we walk a lot. Stiff shoes can cause foot fatigue if worn for a full workday.

Is your trick to wear a wet sock for 2 hrs? I got a pair of PS wholecut loafers which are a too tight on my left heel.
post #30 of 60
I'm definitely in the "stretch to fit" camp. I can't stand walking miles a day without some support from the shoe from a precise fit.

Since sitting at a desk all day with a restrictive shoe is distracting at best, I break shoes in by running errands in them first, or on weekends. Some shoes have responded to this tactic better than others. The double-soled Polo benchgrade shoes took months to break in.

My most comfortable shoes have a midsole that gets imprinted with my foot. This takes a few miles, but results in serious comfort. This is also why I suspect used shoes (beyond a few wearings) won't ever be quite right. Once the midsole is compressed by another foot, it won't ever be perfect for you.

Nice idea with the wet sock. Sounds kinda nasty, but effective.
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