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Fedora vs. Trilby - Page 2

post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Bernhard Roetzel's response:
"It's the size of the brim that makes the difference if there is a difference at all. A Porkpie is a Porkpie and a Homburg (or Anthony Eden) is a Homburg (called "Homburger" in it's native land Germany) but Trilby and Fedora are so closeley related that the differences are almost irrelevant, at least in my opinion. Other languages know neither of these names anyway."
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
From Bates Hatters in London:

"Good question! We are often asked this in store as although Fedora’s and Trilby’s are essentially the same hat, there are some notable differences. A Fedora is commonly known to have a larger brim, usually at least 2.5 inches if not larger. Our widest brimmed Fedora that we have here at Bates goes by the name of the ‘Bruand’ and is 4 inches wide! The brims are usually flat and with a pinched crown. The Trilby however has a smaller brim and sometimes, but not always, a shorter crown. The brim will generally be slanting down and the back slightly turned up. Our most popular trilby design is currently the ‘Weekender’, a brim size of only 2 inches, which comes in numerous colours and is the perfect hat for a city wearer. Hopefully this clears up the differences but do let us know if you have any other questions!"
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post


Well said! The stingy brim hat chosen to represent the fedora above sure doesn't look like what I'd call a fedora.


Post a picture of what you understand to be a fedora?

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Singlemalt View Post


Post a picture of what you understand to be a fedora?

fedora_hats.gif

The idea that a fedora must have a wider brim than a fedora is a silly attempt to manufacture a difference between the terms where there really isn't much of one, but that piece of crap you posted is only marginally a fedora. A real fedora is blocked out of a one piece felt (ideally fur felt, but wool felt is valid, if an inferior material) or woven straw blank, with a crease down the center of the crown. It is commonly pinched, but that's not a necessary element. You can have a fedora that looks like this:

hats_off-fedora.jpg

The best definitions of each would seem to draw a distinction in that the trilby must have a short brim, while the fedora may have a short or a wider brim, and that the fedora must be blocked out of one piece of material (with certain exceptions) while the term trilby allows for a cut and sew construction where multiple pieces of fabric or straw are sewn together, but that last distinction has become fairly meaningless in modern usage.

But both of the hats you posted are complete crap, and aren't even close to what a traditional example of either hat would look like. This, for example, would be a more traditional example of a trilby. The 2nd picture in my post would also qualify:

513hatDonegalgrey.jpg
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


fedora_hats.gif
The idea that a fedora must have a wider brim than a fedora is a silly attempt to manufacture a difference between the terms where there really isn't much of one, but that piece of crap you posted is only marginally a fedora. A real fedora is blocked out of a one piece felt (ideally fur felt, but wool felt is valid, if an inferior material) or woven straw blank, with a crease down the center of the crown. It is commonly pinched, but that's not a necessary element. You can have a fedora that looks like this:
hats_off-fedora.jpg
The best definitions of each would seem to draw a distinction in that the trilby must have a short brim, while the fedora may have a short or a wider brim, and that the fedora must be blocked out of one piece of material (with certain exceptions) while the term trilby allows for a cut and sew construction where multiple pieces of fabric or straw are sewn together, but that last distinction has become fairly meaningless in modern usage.
But both of the hats you posted are complete crap, and aren't even close to what a traditional example of either hat would look like. This, for example, would be a more traditional example of a trilby. The 2nd picture in my post would also qualify:
513hatDonegalgrey.jpg

 

I didn't mention anything about material or quality of build but rather the general shape and more specifically the way the brim is folded. That's how I learned it over the years. But as others have pointed it out, it's a controversial topic, even on hat forums. Bates Hatters definition seems logical, something I'd consider as the proper definition.

 

Good thing you pointed out the fact that they're are pieces of crap. Excellent wording and mature way of conveying your opinion. I appreciate that.

 

And yes, I agree that the idea that a fedora must have a wider brim than a fedora is a silly one. Good call.

post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Last sentence, in particular, of last post - hmmmm....
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Singlemalt View Post

I didn't mention anything about material or quality of build but rather the general shape and more specifically the way the brim is folded. That's how I learned it over the years. But as others have pointed it out, it's a controversial topic, even on hat forums. Bates Hatters definition seems logical, something I'd consider as the proper definition.

Good thing you pointed out the fact that they're are pieces of crap. Excellent wording and mature way of conveying your opinion. I appreciate that.

And yes, I agree that the idea that a fedora must have a wider brim than a fedora is a silly one. Good call.

The brim fold has absolutely nothing to do with it. That's called a snap brim, and it's easy to turn the brim up or down depending on your mood. The same brim can be down in front and up in the back, down in both the front and back, or up in both the front and back. Hell, I've seen some people (well, mostly Johnny Depp) snap theirs to the side.

And sorry if I didn't mince words, but I didn't want OP thinking you had any idea what you were talking about.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lafont View Post

How about "fedora" generally an American term and "trilby" British?
Until 25 years ago or so the term "fedora" was virtually unknown in Britain.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lafont View Post

Trilby and Fedora are so closely related that the differences are almost irrelevant...Other languages know neither of these names anyway."
I think this is the situation in Britain today; but your quotation from Bates throws another light on this question.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamson View Post

Until 25 years ago or so the term "fedora" was virtually unknown in Britain.
.

Turtle bollocks mate.
post #25 of 25
Were you around there and then, Sir? I certainly was.

Why can't SF members who dislike what others write respond with a degree of politeness?
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